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20 lb. Turkey - Page 2

post #21 of 29
I smoke-roast birds larger than 12 lbs every year. I do oven temps: 325-350*F. The secret is to get from 40-140*F in less than 4 hrs. If you can cook it in the oven you can cook it on a smoker (which is an outside oven ...but with better temp control).

To get the WSM to 350*F I have a dry foiled water pan and place a skewer between the lid and center section to create more chimney effect. Offsetting the lid does the same thing but I like the skewer.

With an 18", you can also put the door on upside down and prop it open to get it hot (without water).
Edited by Bama BBQ - 11/18/13 at 11:03am
post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 

Brinkmann Dual Function 3-Burner Propane Gas / Charcoal Grill and Smoker is the exact smoker. Any advice?

post #23 of 29
I just did a 20# bird this past Sunday. Now I have a propane smoker. Check out my post. Or pm me. Mine took about 7 hours at an average temp of 225 to 300. He was perfect and delish! I was well out of the 140 degree danger zone with in 2.5 to 3 hours. Just pm me if ya need. By no means am I a professional turkey smoker but I will help any way I can.
post #24 of 29
Now that I'm out of my tryptophan comma... That was one delicious bird!!!! My dome temp gauge may be off a bit though. At 250F and five hours on the WSM 18" breast temped at 190F. Meat was a bit dry but not compared to what I'm used to on thanksgiving day, sorry mom. And what a flavor. Thank you for your advice gentlemen!!

Bobby.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRDFurgesson View Post

Now that I'm out of my tryptophan comma... That was one delicious bird!!!! My dome temp gauge may be off a bit though. At 250F and five hours on the WSM 18" breast temped at 190F. Meat was a bit dry but not compared to what I'm used to on thanksgiving day, sorry mom. And what a flavor. Thank you for your advice gentlemen!!

Bobby.
Pull it at 165*F (breast) and you won't know what hit you: moisture!
Edited by Bama BBQ - 11/19/13 at 7:45am
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by FWIsmoker View Post
 

I would have went no water and foiled the bowl but since you did just let the water evaporate and don't refill so you can get hotter temps to crisp the skin. These smokers with water pans were designed to keep lower temps with water...no water you'll be able to get well into the 300's. 

Agree on not using water. One thing that can happen when not using water in a propane smoker is wind will cause large temp fluctuations. I place an old fireplace brick just above the flame to help with this. It also shields the smoke box from some of the high direct flame that is required to get things 325-350, ensuring I have that nice TBS.

post #27 of 29

More Thanksgiving Smoking Questions Answered

Why should I cook two small birds instead of a large one?

Bacteria grows best between 40 -140 and is what we call the danger zone. In a larger turkey (more than 12 pounds), it takes a longer time to get past that 140 degree mark and proves to be a huge risk when cooking at low temperatures.

Smaller birds will get past this point much faster making it a much safer option.

So, if you need a 20 lb turkey, simply cook two 10 lb turkeys and not only will it get done faster, it will be a lot safer.

post #28 of 29
I found myself with a thawed 20 lb turkey so I decided to try my first smoked turkey. I spatchcocked it then cut it in half. I brined it only 18 hrs. Brine was 64 oz cran-pomegranate juice, 1cup salt, half cup raw sugar, tbs garlic powder, tbs coarse black pepper, tbs poultry seasoning., added 2qts water. After their bath then next day I rinsed, dried, wiped with olive oil, then rubbed both sides. Under the skin I used grill-mates poultry rub and outside used Big Bad rub from Jeff's book. I used 2oz pecan and 2 oz. Apple in my Smokin-it #2. Set at 250 initially, then dropped it to 225 after an hour. Was out of danger zone by 2 hours. I had temp probe in breast of one half and thigh of other.
Amazing smell from this combo, I fought the urge to open it to baste or anything. At 4 hours was at 165. I pulled them out then wrapped in foil for about 30 min.

I cut up only half for dinner. OMG was it good. Not overly smoked or salty. My wife loved it too. She is doing a traditional bird in the oven next week, but of course I'll rave over hers too!
post #29 of 29

First, of course pick a quality bird. A big bird as the left overs are great! I like 20lbs or so. Then, you will need a plastic tub of some sort to brind (walmart has plenty).

2 gallons of distilled water, one gallon of apple juice, cup of salt, cup of sugar, about 5-6 sticks of butter. I like fresh rosemary and course black pepper (but you can use whatever rub you want). Thaw the bird completely and trim. The night before, in the tub, add salt and sugar, pour about half gallon of apple juice and whisk until dissolved. Place bird in the tub, pour remaining apple juice and distilled water until bird is completely submerged then place in frig overnight.

 

The next morning, remove bird pat dry with paper towels. Using 4 sticks of soften butter add rosemary and black pepper mix with fork. Prior to this I start my smoker. Using your hand, loosen the skin as much as possible. Then grab a handful of the butter mixture and rub it over the turkey (under the skin) and inside the cavity. Also add a few sprig of rosemary. Rub the skin with mixture as well. Then place on smoker at 275. 20lbs take about 3.5 to 5 hours.

 

Every 30 minutes or so baste with melted butter. If (and it will) the wing tips or leg tips start to get to brown wrap the area with pieces of foil. If the breast start to get too brown, tent with foil. Once it reaches temp (checking between leg and thigh joint, being sure not to touch the bone)  wrap in foil for 30 minutes before carving.

 

By the way I use apple wood to smoke with. Also, trust me BRIND...always BRIND!

 

Yum...Yum!!  

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