SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Preserving Food › Curing › Calculating bacon cure time using Morton® Tender Quick® or Sugar Cure® (Plain or Smoke Flavored)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Calculating bacon cure time using Morton® Tender Quick® or Sugar Cure® (Plain or Smoke Flavored) - Page 2

post #21 of 33

Hmm OK Bear.

post #22 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post


You can also vac pac if you have a vacuum packer.

Not the best method but you can wrap with cling wrap. If you do make sure you have a good wrap on it and several layers. Place the wrapped belly in something in case it leaks.

 

The vac pack I find the best and cleanest method. Not only does it stop any leaks it also ensures that any resulting brine stays in intimate contact with the meat. A side seal vacuum packer is inexpensive these days and is a very versatile method of packing for the fridge or freezer.

post #23 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wade View Post
 

 

The vac pack I find the best and cleanest method. Not only does it stop any leaks it also ensures that any resulting brine stays in intimate contact with the meat. A side seal vacuum packer is inexpensive these days and is a very versatile method of packing for the fridge or freezer.


I have a question on vac packing.  Wouldn't that keep the juices from exiting the meat blending with the cure and then being re-absorbed?

 

T

post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr T 59874 View Post
 


I have a question on vac packing.  Wouldn't that keep the juices from exiting the meat blending with the cure and then being re-absorbed?

 

T

 

This is a good question....!

I tried speed curing bacon in a vacuum tumbler

The experiment was to see if I could cure bacon starting on Friday, smoke on Saturday and slice/pack on Sunday

The cure penetrated the bacon, but the flavor was just not there

Some things just can't be rushed

 

Someone would have to vac seal a slab and have another slab in a zip lock bag as a control

 

I have plenty of bacon on hand or I would take on the task

Anyone willing to try this test?

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

Reply
post #25 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJohnson View Post
 

 

This is a good question....!

I tried speed curing bacon in a vacuum tumbler

The experiment was to see if I could cure bacon starting on Friday, smoke on Saturday and slice/pack on Sunday

The cure penetrated the bacon, but the flavor was just not there

Some things just can't be rushed

 

Someone would have to vac seal a slab and have another slab in a zip lock bag as a control

 

I have plenty of bacon on hand or I would take on the task

Anyone willing to try this test?

 

Interesting experiment, Todd. Thanks for sharing the results.  I've had excellent results using the bag on a rack method, so will continue using that method.  I agree, some things just can't or shouldn't be rushed.

 

With 13 smokers (envious) on hand, I can see how you could have plenty of bacon on hand (envious again).

 

Happy New Year, Todd, we appreciate all you do.

 

Tom.

post #26 of 33
I have cured in both vac pac and ziplock. I cured the same length in the vac bags as I would otherwise. I can say that there was no difference in flavor or texture.
post #27 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

I have cured in both vac pac and ziplock. I cured the same length in the vac bags as I would otherwise. I can say that there was no difference in flavor or texture.

 

Good enough for me.  Thanks DS.

 

Tom

post #28 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr T 59874 View Post


I have a question on vac packing.  Wouldn't that keep the juices from exiting the meat blending with the cure and then being re-absorbed?

 

For bacon the purpose is to get the cure into the meat rather than to remove juices from the meat. This takes time and it is important that the cure remains in contact with the meat so that it can be absorbed. If you allow the extracted juices to flow away from the pork it will actually flush away any surface cure along with it. This is the reason why with a zip loc bag it is important to keep turning the meat during the curing process to keep the resulting brine in contact with the meat. When vac packing you still need to turn the meat during the curing time however the vac pack helps keep the cure/brine in intimate contact with the meat surface. Even when vac packing there is still a considerable amount of liquid brine that is produced.

post #29 of 33
Vac packing does not reduce the curing time. It just helps keep the cure in contact with the meat while it cures.
post #30 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wade View Post

 

 

 Even when vac packing there is still a considerable amount of liquid brine that is produced.

 

This answers my question, thanks.

 

Tom

post #31 of 33

I have a little bit to add to the discussion...  "America's Test Kitchen" did a test on various ziplock type bags and the ones with the zippers were the worst performers for sealing.

post #32 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 

I go by my own calculating that I learned on this forum.

 

Mortons tends to change things around with each book they print.

Plus when you call them it depends on which person you talk to, as to what your answer will be.

I've already called them on one day & got one answer. Then there was some questions about what they told me, so I called a few days later & got a different answer from another person.

 

I never had a piece of meat not completely cured to center, and I don't change my methods, like Mortons does.

 

I use 1/2 ounce (1 TBS) per pound, but I do one day per 1/2" of total thickness, and then add a minimum of 2 days for safety. Then I usually add 2 more days. So going by my way, I would cure a 2" Belly for --------4 + 2 + 2 = 8 days.

 

Nothing wrong with going 14, instead of 8 days, but you better do a test fry, because it's gonna be salty from the extra time in cure.

 

 

My 2 cents.

 

Bear

 

Hi Bear.... Question for you.

 

I use the Morton Plain Sugar Cure with 1 TB of cure per pound when doing slabs between 1-2 inches thick. I cure this at about 38° and like you for about 8-10 days.

 

The comment I have is this: The first time I smoked bacon I used the rinse method after the cure. It turned out too salty to eat (more like salt pork than bacon) and I am a basic salt lover so that's saying a lot. I then had to soak the bacon in water (after smoking it) to make it edible. That took a lot of flavor out of the finished bacon and also rinsed off the pepper seasoning I used.

 

Now, after the 8 day cure time, I soak the slabs in water for about 6-8 hours (changing the water once after about 2 hours) to remove some of the salt content in the bacon. I pat it dry, add the spices and leave it open to the air in the fridge overnight. It then goes into the cold smoker the next day.

 

Question: Do you see anything wrong with this method of soaking prior to the smoke as far as safety goes? I have done 4 batches of this over the last 2 years with no problems. All turned out fantastic. What are your thoughts on this?

 

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Clark

post #33 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarkr View Post
 

 

Hi Bear.... Question for you.

 

I use the Morton Plain Sugar Cure with 1 TB of cure per pound when doing slabs between 1-2 inches thick. I cure this at about 38° and like you for about 8-10 days.

 

The comment I have is this: The first time I smoked bacon I used the rinse method after the cure. It turned out too salty to eat (more like salt pork than bacon) and I am a basic salt lover so that's saying a lot. I then had to soak the bacon in water (after smoking it) to make it edible. That took a lot of flavor out of the finished bacon and also rinsed off the pepper seasoning I used.

 

Now, after the 8 day cure time, I soak the slabs in water for about 6-8 hours (changing the water once after about 2 hours) to remove some of the salt content in the bacon. I pat it dry, add the spices and leave it open to the air in the fridge overnight. It then goes into the cold smoker the next day.

 

Question: Do you see anything wrong with this method of soaking prior to the smoke as far as safety goes? I have done 4 batches of this over the last 2 years with no problems. All turned out fantastic. What are your thoughts on this?

 

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Clark


I can't see how that would be unsafe. I would worry more about washing the flavor out.

 

However I have never used their "Sugar Cure", and if this is what's happening for you, I would never use it.

 

I've been using their Tender Quick for 6 years, and I have been using basically the same method all of those 6 years, and I have never had a TQ cured Belly Bacon, CB, BBB, or Dried Beef that came out too salty. All I ever do is give it a short soak (Maybe 1/2 Hour) just to get rid of the Surface salt. And I'm used to using very little salt, due to a Kidney problem caused by a Dr Screw-up.

 

The only time I ever had to soak Bacon to eliminate extra salt flavor was the one time I used "Hi Mt Cure & Seasoning".

 

You could go to my "Step by Step Index", and check out any of my "Bacon" Step by Steps (My Favorite is "Bacon (Extra Smoky)", and follow that---Then see how you like it.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Bear

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Curing
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Preserving Food › Curing › Calculating bacon cure time using Morton® Tender Quick® or Sugar Cure® (Plain or Smoke Flavored)