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Dry Aging Prime Rib questions

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Each year when my family gets together we have prime rib for Christmas dinner. Years ago my brother and I fired our dad from cooking the roast. Then I fired my brother. So for the past 3 years I have cooked the roast for Christmas, and now the job is permanently mine. I usually cook a few more  throughout the year for different occasions.

 

I usually go to Costco and buy the two largest rib roasts they have. They are choice grade boneless whole ribeye and are 13 lbs + each. I then take them home and dry age them in my garage refrigerator, aka the meat frig, for 30 days. I have read a lot and here is the best info I have located: http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/03/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-dry-aging-beef-at-home.html

 

This year I am going to look around and see if I can find a bone in rib roast – my Costco doesn’t carry them, and see if that makes a difference. I also plan to change from my usual aging time of 30 days to  45 days. I'm hoping for that stronger flavor of a true prime aged grade of beef.

 

So who regularly ages rib roasts and how long do you age them? Do you do anything special in your aging process?

post #2 of 5

As with many things you will get different opinions on whether or not it is beneficial or even possible to dry age at home or not along with many different ways of doing it.  The following is the way mine is done with excellent results both in the restaurant and home environment's. "Ugly Duckling" Dry Aged - Salt Crusted - Prime Rib Roast - Q/View

 

Let us know your results.

 

Tom

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Great post Mr T. Do you know if there is a noticeable flavor difference between a large piece of meat vs a smaller one after the aging process?

post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeepLJ View Post
 

Great post Mr T. Do you know if there is a noticeable flavor difference between a large piece of meat vs a smaller one after the aging process?

If you are asking the difference in a large rib roast versus a smaller one, the answer is no.  The thickness is basically the same.

 

The advantage of salt crusting in my opinion is moisture retention and even cooking from center to the edge.  Never could see putting bark on a piece of meat of this caliber.  At most a light sear for the ones who want their meat a little more on the done side.  For those who want a touch of smoke, I place their steak on a rack within a hotel pan and give it a shot of heavy smoke, lid it and let rest for a couple minutes before service.

 

Hope this answers your question,

 

Tom

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

So I just ran across one of my old post and thought I would revive it.

 

So Christmas 2013 I cooked 2 boneless rib roasts (aka Prime Rib, defined by cut not by grade)

 

I did 2 identical roasts, one dry aged, one wet aged. Both aged for 45 days. I consulted the #1 high end restaurant meat supplier for the Dallas area and he said "wet aged if the best".  I will say there is a huge difference between the two processes. And in my opinion and everyone who had the two processes of meat, dry aged is the way to go. 

 

I have 2 more weeks to go on my latest 45 day dry aged rib roast. Hopefully I will remember to take some photos this time and share with the group.

 

Has anyone else aged there own meat?

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