or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Recipes Only › Breads › FINALLY!! Biscuits I can be proud of.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

FINALLY!! Biscuits I can be proud of. - Page 2

post #21 of 35
Thread Starter 

Jeramy, I think your post pretty much sums up why most of us love cooking. It's not about the food, but about the emotions that are served with it. In today's narcissistic world, that idea of putting all your love into a simple biscuit to be served to patients and staff at a hospital might seem quaint and almost silly, but it's that kind of unselfish dedication to others which we desperately need! Soul food isn't about black or white, it's about caring for others and meeting the most basic, elemental human needs, food and comfort. Some of my fondest memories from my early years were of hanging out in my Aunt Mary's kitchen on holidays while she flailed around like a mad woman doing her best Julia Child impression and juggling 27 things at once. Most wouldn't consider what she was preparing soul food, but it was. It was about loving her family and nourishing them. Whether it's hog jowls, greens and black eyed peas in a tenement kitchen or beef tenderloin and roasted asparagus with Hollandaise in a penthouse apartment, the warmth and love is the same.

post #22 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarjarchef View Post

Great looking food.......... I can hold my own in a bakery, but it is hit or miss mostly with breads.


I worked with a couple ladies over the years that would make what I call hand biscuits. They measure everything by their hands, no measuring cups or spoons...... I tried one day to measure what they put in and repeat it.......well not the same by any means..........they also would use a knife to cut the biscuits out.........when I asked why they did it that way...... They just looked and smiled and said " you want them all to be the same. If I cut circles I will have scraps and if I work them again they will be tough. Now we would not want some to get good biscuits and others get tuff biscuits would we?" I would stop asking questions because I knew if I pushed it, I would not get a fresh one out of the oven. That was in the very beginning of my career over 23 years ago when I worked in a hospital kitchen. To this day I have never had biscuits like theirs. Both ladies have passed and I have never had any biscuits that even came close to theirs. What they made IMHO is the true essence of "soul food". They put so much love into their food every day. I don't know if they rubbed off on my Grandmother or she on them, but for their generation and the relationship they had for the times, it was not common. I was blessed to experience their love for friends, family and food. I cooked for many years and did pretty well, but had no reason why I was doing it. Then when I went through some life changing events. I realized I was trying to be and cook something that I was not. I went back to cooking for the love of family, friends and bringing that fresh from the oven biscuit feeling to my guests. It is nice to play with some of the things we do at work, but my passion will always be simple comfort food made with love.



Ok, ok, ok I will stop now. It was just when I saw the recipe, the ingredients and the cutting discussion it brought back many memories. Not many recipes have lard in them anymore.

Jeramy

Jeramy....that sums how I feel 100%....I cook because I love my family and I hope that they know that and think of the memories in the kitchen was after I am gone!

 

Kat

post #23 of 35

Great looking breads.  Aren't those Baguettes fun.

 

Tom

post #24 of 35

I can't tell you how happy I was to find this recipe - and now that I've actually done it, I couldn't be happier.

 

Truth be told, I've never made biscuits before... ever! So my technique needs work. That said, the texture, flavor and buttery goodness is spot on.

 

After I 'nuked' the kitchen preparing these, she said, "these better be good." After breakfast she declared, "they were worth the disaster. 

 

Mize en Place

I followed the instructions to the letter... well almost.

I rolled them way too flat so that why they were... well... flat. This one was a ball of leftover dough and it was awesome!

No matter how flat my biscuits were - they were terrific! Pictured with my homemade sausage.

 

Thanks for posting the recipe!!! We truly enjoyed it.

post #25 of 35

Such bread skills! This is really impressive and it was fun to read of all different flours, stories, passions, people, and the south, and so it goes! Terrific thread! Cheers! - Leah

post #26 of 35

Never roll a biscuit, never work a Biscuit. The more you touch them the harder/flatter they become. Mix a biscuit with a rubber spatula, using a cutting motion, gently. Don't over mix. When you turn the dough out, with a floured hand gently press down the dough to the desired thickness for cutting.

 

Your biscuits will be so light and fluffy they will float off the biscuit pan.

 

Those biscuits look might tastee though..... Next stop is making jellys and jams.....LOL

 

I just noticed, eggs, grits, sausage, biscuits, gravy! That must be SOUTHERN Az. <Big Grin>

post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post
 

Never roll a biscuit, never work a Biscuit. The more you touch them the harder/flatter they become. Mix a biscuit with a rubber spatula, using a cutting motion, gently. Don't over mix. When you turn the dough out, with a floured hand gently press down the dough to the desired thickness for cutting.

 

Your biscuits will be so light and fluffy they will float off the biscuit pan.

 

Those biscuits look might tastee though..... Next stop is making jellys and jams.....LOL

 

I just noticed, eggs, grits, sausage, biscuits, gravy! That must be SOUTHERN Az. <Big Grin>

Thanks for the tips Foamheart! I'm new to this biscuit thang.

 

Saguaro and prickly pear fruit jelly perhaps?

 

Southern? Just moved (back) to the Old Pueblo from Kentucky (17 years) and Alabama (8 years) before that. The moniker Gringo is Sonoran code for 'red neck'. (grin) (I was KYDave on here before.)

post #28 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GringoDave View Post
 

 

 

Truth be told, I've never made biscuits before... ever!

 

 

Looks awesome!! So glad you enjoyed it. One thing though, save that bread flour for bread. Get yourself some White Lily AP and the difference will astound you. If you can't find White Lily you can mix cake flour and regular AP flour and come close.

post #29 of 35

Thanks MDBoatBum! I will look for the Lily AP flour. Truth be told, all I had was King Arthur bread flour. Seemed to work just fine - though the AP could be significantly cheaper. Thanks again for the tips!!!

post #30 of 35
Thread Starter 

Well I've reached a point where I think I can add this one to my recipe book and never change it. The basic recipe is the same, with a couple minor tweaks.

Here is the revised, final, never to be changed, best damn biscuits I've ever made, recipe.

 

2 cups White Lily AP flour plus more for rolling

3TB cold butter cut into 1/4" cubes (about 1.5 oz)

2.5 oz. cold lard (Total shortening between the butter and flour is 4oz)

3/4-1 1/4 cups buttermilk (plus more for brushing the biscuits)

1TB baking powder (I used Aluminum free to avoid the metallic taste)

1tsp salt

1/4 tsp baking soda

 

Preheat oven to 500˚

Combine dry ingredients in food processor and pulse to combine.

Add shortening and pulse just until you have roughly pea sized pieces.

Dump mixture into large mixing bowl and add buttermilk. Mix with a wooden spoon just until all flour is incorporated and you have a wet, sticky dough.

Turn mixture out onto a generously floured board and fold it over onto itself, incorporating a little flour each time, until it just comes together and is no longer sticky.

Dough will be VERY SOFT.

Pat into a circle about 1" thick and cut with a floured biscuit cutter.

CAREFULLY place biscuits on oiled or parchment lined baking sheet so that the sides are touching each other.

With your thumb, make a 1/4" dent in the center of each biscuit.

Brush tops of biscuits with buttermilk and bake for 12-18 minutes, or until the tops are golden brown and biscuits have risen to about double original height.

OPTIONAL: Brush tops of biscuits with melted butter when you remove them from the oven.

Let rest for 3-4 minutes before eating so A) you don't burn your mouth, and B) what little protein there is has time to set so they don't fall apart. They're THAT tender.

 

post #31 of 35
Thread Starter 

Since it's now egg nog season, I just made up a batch using egg nog instead of buttermilk. Added about a tablespoon of sugar and a half teaspoon of freshly grated nutmeg and skipped the baking soda. Haven't tasted yet, but they sure smell good!! I'm thinking they'll be delicious with some fruit compote, maybe dried cherries, cranberries apricots and figs.

 

post #32 of 35

Now you should own a restaurant, or bakery or B & B! Maybe you already do??? So professional your creations are!!! Wonderful!! Cheers! - Leah

post #33 of 35
Thread Starter 

Haha!! Not so fast!! I just tasted them and they taste like dishwater! Not sure what went wrong but something sure did.

post #34 of 35

Had to laugh, as you apparently forgot to reference the post you make just prior to this one, where you said:

 

Quote:
 Well I've reached a point where I think I can add this one to my recipe book and never change it.

 

You made it almost 2 weeks.  For the record, I should be the last one laughing, as I have yet to make an edible biscuit.  Still struck me as funny.

post #35 of 35
Thread Starter 

Well I guess I should have listened to my earlier post. These were not a success.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Breads
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Recipes Only › Breads › FINALLY!! Biscuits I can be proud of.