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bread on a smoker

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Can I make bread on a smoker?  Any thoughts on particulars such as heat, amount of smoke, time in the smoker, or anything else that might come to mind.  Thanks so much.  I guess I'm relating this over to a wood fired oven.  Suckers are so popular with making pizzas.  Seems to me, a smoker should function as a wood fired oven.  Thanks so much.

post #2 of 12

Funny, I was wondering the same and may give it a try soon.  I really don't see why not, if your smoker can maintain high temps, 350f and I was thinking of a lite smoke, as the bread would absorb a lot of the smoke.  I'll use my bread maker to make the dough and form a round loaf and place it on a cookie sheet with a lite dusting of corn meal.  Wish I could get some sour dough starter for this experiment, but I'll go with yeast method and a multi grain recipe that I have used already.

 

Maybe someone more experienced would share???????????

post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by litespeedlujak View Post
 

Can I make bread on a smoker?  Any thoughts on particulars such as heat, amount of smoke, time in the smoker, or anything else that might come to mind.  Thanks so much.  I guess I'm relating this over to a wood fired oven.  Suckers are so popular with making pizzas.  Seems to me, a smoker should function as a wood fired oven.  Thanks so much.

I've not made bread on my smoker but I have used it as an oven. I've baked cobbler and other things with no problems. I have made a lot of bread, and will tell you that bread will react to different levels of humidity in whatever device you're cooking it in. Higher humidity will yield crispier crust. So if you're going for baguettes or sourdough, use the water pan if you have one. If you're going for a soft bread like Amish white bread, then lose the water.

I'd also go very lightly on the smoke.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by expat smoker View Post

 

Wish I could get some sour dough starter for this experiment, but I'll go with yeast method and a multi grain recipe that I have used already.

If you want to get some good sourdough flavor just add whatever amount of water and yeast the recipe calls for to an equal amount of flour the day before. Leave it loosely covered in a bowl on your kitchen counter for 18-24 hours and it will develop a nice sourdough flavor. Next day just add the rest of the ingredients and follow the recipe as usual. 

post #4 of 12

I have done pizza on the Weber Kettle and it was great.  My Smoke Vault will go as high as I want...but sadly haven't tried breads in her.

 

Kat

post #5 of 12

"If you want to get some good sourdough flavor just add whatever amount of water and yeast the recipe calls for to an equal amount of flour the day before. Leave it loosely covered in a bowl on your kitchen counter for 18-24 hours and it will develop a nice sourdough flavor. Next day just add the rest of the ingredients and follow the recipe as usual."

 

sounds too easy MD..............I'll give it a go with my breadmaker to do the manual labor and stick it in my smoker after my chickens come out this weekend.  Thanks,

Jack

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by expat smoker View Post
 

 

 

sounds too easy MD..............

It is too easy :) Mind you, this will give a bit of sourdough flavor, but not the texture and crust of true sourdough. It's a quick cheat that I use quite a bit when making white sandwich bread. Just gives it a bit more flavor. If you want something a bit more rustic and closer to true sourdough, try "no knead" bread.

post #7 of 12

If you are in a hurry for sourdough taste. Add 1 TBS of white vinegar to your water.

 

For smoked bread, I bake the bread in a conventional oven and allow to cool for a minimum of two hours.  Just prior to consumption, slice and place in a medium to heavy smoke for 30 - 60 seconds, but for the smoked flavor, smoked homemade butter is much easier and convenient.

 

Tom

post #8 of 12

I have done the no knead method and love the texture and you're right in that the texture is a lot like sour dough.  Maybe I'll try that next time.  

post #9 of 12
You can absolutely bake bread in a smoker. You are correct: it is simply an outdoor oven. Although I do not use smoke wood I still get a hint of smoke from the lump. I like to put my dutch oven in at 350* and bake Saltgrass Shiner Bock Bread:

IMG_1623_zpse1a147bb.jpg

IMG_1264_zps97978291.jpg
Edited by Bama BBQ - 10/13/13 at 7:48am
post #10 of 12

Well, this weekend I did the bread in the smoker using the quick sour dough method mentioned and the bread came out beautiful.....good rise and great color, but the taste test wasn't what I expected.  Minimal smoke flavor and hardly any sour dough taste [Read more on that technique and suggestions were to leave the 'mother' out to ferment for a week.   Also, the bread was quite moist..........maybe due to the water pan I left inside.  Despite the comments above, the bread was quite edible and made good breakfast toast.

I'll post a q view as soon as I can get it out of my camera.

post #11 of 12

The overnight ferment will only give a slight sourdough flavor. There really isn't a way to create real sourdough without real sourdough starter. Fermenting for a week would get you closer, but still not REAL sourdough. Sorry if I misled you, I just meant it gives a little more flavor than plain old white bread.

post #12 of 12

Just came across this where they smoke the flour, then use it to make "smoked bread". 

Looks pretty interesting.....

 

http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/06/18/smoked-bread-to-make-at-home/

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