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Making our own cure...

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Finding cure here in Thailand is next to impossible. Shipping it here from the states is both time consuming and difficult as well. To speed up the process… I have purchased 2 pounds of "Food Grade Sodium Nitrite" in the states from a reliable source and would like to make up my own batch of Cure #1. Has anyone on this forum done this in the past? If yes… do you have any tips that would help me along the way.

post #2 of 7

I found this http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/a/making-your-own-curing-salts

 

Don't know if it's what you are looking for.

post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by stewstrum View Post
 

Finding cure here in Thailand is next to impossible. Shipping it here from the states is both time consuming and difficult as well. To speed up the process… I have purchased 2 pounds of "Food Grade Sodium Nitrite" in the states from a reliable source and would like to make up my own batch of Cure #1. Has anyone on this forum done this in the past? If yes… do you have any tips that would help me along the way.

 

Stew, morning.....  There are different Nitrite cures from different countries....  In the US, Cure #1 is 6.25% nitrite and the rest is non-iodized salt and red food coloring to distinguish it from other seasonings...   

At that concentration/mix, 4 oz. is used for 100 pounds of meat, (156 Ppm nitrite) and as a general rule, depends on what curing method you are using, 1.1 grams per pound to cure meats (156 Ppm nitrite) ...    Bacon, 0.87 grams per pound is recommended, skin off (120 Ppm nitrite).... skin on, 0.80 grams per pound is recommended (skin does not absorb cure and is considered 10% of the belly)...  

 

As far as mixing you own, a good grams scale is recommended...   937 grams of salt and 62.5 grams of nitrite...   Mix very well, and mix before each use....   Adding a food coloring to the nitrite or the salt, will be a visual aid to insure adequate mixing...  

One other point, use a salt that is of the same granular size and shape of the nitrite, to help reduce the segregation that is inherent in mixes of different particle size.....  

Use recipes from this forum or other US based forums....   Our recipes follow the guidelines of the USDA, FSIS etc. and they reflect the 6.25% nitrite in cure #1..... 

 

Dave

post #4 of 7

Just to add to Daves post . If you dye each of  the 2 ingredients a different color. say pink/ red and blue you can be sure of a good mix.

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks Guys.... We want to always be safe.

post #6 of 7
For safety's sake it's not a good idea to create a mix from pure sodium nitrite, it can be very dangerous because the resulting mix is not homogeneous like cure #1 or cure #2, meaning the salt and nitrite are not combined together so that they do not separate. If separation occurs with the mix you're proposing, you could be left with toxic levels of sodium nitrite in parts of your mix.

The best way to do it is to very carefully calculate the sodium nitrite needed on a project to project basis and get a very accurate calibratable milligram scale in order to measure out the proper amount of nitrite. It definitely must be a very high quality scale and you must be able to confirm the calibration.

Please make sure that you totally and completely understand what you're doing, especially the proper, safe and appropriate levels of nitrite before proceeding.
Nitrite is even more toxic than nitrate so you must be very careful.
Confirm your understanding with someone who knows what they are doing.
Check, double-check and triple-check your calculations and measurements.


~Martin
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank You Martin….

We will make it project by project as you suggested… one of our guys is a retired chemist and has his own scales that can be calibrated.    

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