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Ham Question

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

So after the ham is cured, tested and no bone sour detected, smoked, bagged and hung.

 

I keep reading and realize it takes good air circulation to evaporate or dry the ham. Does the drying effect a cooler/reefer's ability to achieve the same effect as hanging in the smoke house? Is the reefer a slower dehydrator or is it about the same.

 

Basically does it change anything in the drying process to leave it in the cooler?

 

I have two home refrigerators, and a beer reefer and a now a meat reefer. I should have room.

post #2 of 8

The true country hams are dry cured and benefit mostly after curing by being kept in an open air environment below 90°for months.  Because it is wet brined you have produced what is known as a "city ham" similar to what is purchased in the markets. As much as I would like to help, I cannot answer your question.  Maybe Pop's can give you some advice.

 

Tom

post #3 of 8

I sent Pops a Pm with a link to here for help.

 

Kat

post #4 of 8

That is one of the differences between a dry cure and a wet cure ham; the wet cure ham requires no hanging or drying.  After curing, smoke it and enjoy!

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

So, in what way would a person look for Bone sour? Smell? Meat discoloration? The line at the outhouse door?

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post
 

So, in what way would a person look for Bone sour? Smell? Meat discoloration? The line at the outhouse door?

Use a stainless steel rod and probe down along the bone and then sniff the rod.  It will give you an indication of a off odor if sour.

 

Tom

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thank ye thank ye...... I don't think I have ever read a thread here with it occurring so was just wondering.

post #8 of 8

It's a rancid smell inside the meat from the cure not reaching the interior of the meat (along the bone) and the meat spoiling because cure did not reach it.  That is why you need to inject (or pump) larger pieces over 2" thick, such as shoulders, hams, even large loins.   

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