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Brinkmann ECB

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have the cheap Brinkmann R2D2 looking smoker to learn with. What would be the best thing to use to fill the gap between the body and the lid? I pumped some fireplace sealant around there and cooked it on but it broke off an hour later. Do they make a moldable gasket to rig in there?

post #2 of 12

I have got some hi-temp RTV silicone for my gap filling something similar to this:

http://www.amazon.com/Rutland-500%C2%B0RTV-Silicone-Black-Cartridge/dp/B000RPW2W2/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1379076514&sr=8-13&keywords=Rutland

should remain flexible and not break off, they have a clear version too if your smoker is a different color than black.

Hope this helps!

post #3 of 12

I meant to say also, apply the silicone to one side (which one is up to you) the put some wax paper or saran wrap over the newly laid bead, then close the lid and let it cure, once cured just peel off the paper / plastic and your all set!

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Does it dry stiff or does it feel like regular silicone? The stuff I had dried almost like concrete.

post #5 of 12
It dries like silicone, not rock hard still a little mailable. It's good to 600* too!
post #6 of 12

Unless there is a vent in the lid, sealing that gap is probably a bad idea. It's the only way for the air/smoke to flow out of the smoker.

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'll look for that stuff around here then. And yes...I'm gonna make a top vent. Either the ol' circle metal with holes or take out that cheezy "Ideal" temp gauge and rig up some sort of stack.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

So....this is a bit off subject for this particular thread but....I found out today that there is a fine line between too much coal and not enough. That line is a bit of a task to stay on. The temps on this ECB are all over the map. Maybe after I seal that crack it will help.

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by NomNomNom View Post
 

So....this is a bit off subject for this particular thread but....I found out today that there is a fine line between too much coal and not enough. That line is a bit of a task to stay on. The temps on this ECB are all over the map. Maybe after I seal that crack it will help.

I am taking the route of sealing every gap and air leak to the point of being able to extinguish the fire by restricting air.  I think that is how the WSM can use the minion method to smoke for hours on end.

post #10 of 12

Ace Hardware sells a Rutland replacement stove gasket kit (choice of 5/16" or 1/2" diameter) that comes with a tube of cement for $12.  I've been having the same issues as y'all and wanted to seal the lid up.  But like Mdboatbum said, make sure you put some decent holes in the lid.  I put (3) evenly spaced 3/4" holes on the top of the lid, and have some old flexible rubber refrigerator magnets that I use to cover them so they're "infinitely adjustable".  Works fine, but with the gaps around the edge, and how warped my lid and body are, it's not solving the problem completely.

 

I was worried about the magnets initially and whether they would melt/drip, but I had it up around 400° with no food in there, and they were good to go.  Been traveling lately so I haven't had the chance to try it all out with the gasket yet, but hopefully I'll be able to this weekend.

 

PH


Edited by PilotPH - 9/17/13 at 10:19am
post #11 of 12

I used fiberglass rope gasket with mine. I at first used the sticky back kind but that fell off after one cook. They I tried the full rope with high-temp furnace cement but that fell off too. They I used just the rope and pulled it tight with a paper clip and it stayed.

 

Unfortunately, the only way I could control the temp was by opening up the lid when the temp dropped and closing it again when it got too hot, even though I made all of the online modifications.

 

Finally I had enough and bought a WSM... :)

 

Steve

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

I sealed it with that Rutland rope. I also bought one of those old fire place air bag things...whatever you call them so I can add oxygen to the fire if it seems to be getting cool. I drilled the holes in the bottom of the coal pan and attached it to a round piece of sheet metal (that is designed for a cold air return or something) and sit that on top of a few bricks to help air flow under the pan. This all seemed to help. Now the trick is to keep the right amount of coal in there....I don't have this timing part down very well for when to add more coal/wood.

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