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Packaging stock for storage at room temperature - Page 2

post #21 of 28

Wade.......  Cr@p......  I didn't realize you were a commercial food processor....   I thought you were doing this for home packaging.....  head-wall.gif .....

 

I know I'm a little slow but holey cow, I didn't think I was that slow.....   talk about molasses in the arctic....   that's Dave..... 

post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hi Dave

I avoid the cheap plastic bags that come from the far east and only use the ones manufactured in Europe by the larger European pouch manufacturers as they are BPA free.

 

I read the article you posted the link to with interest however other similar articles out there contradict what is said in it - http://www.yourdoctorsorders.com/2012/12/sous-vide-and-plastics/

I do not know if either of them tell the whole truth or even part of the truth. Usually the EEC food safety standards are some of the most stringent in the world and these bags are certified by them as being food grade and safe. I will continue to monitor to see if more of a consensus emerges.

post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Wade.......  Cr@p......  I didn't realize you were a commercial food processor....   I thought you were doing this for home packaging.....  head-wall.gif .....

 

I know I'm a little slow but holey cow, I didn't think I was that slow.....   talk about molasses in the arctic....   that's Dave..... 

 

LOL Dave - calling me a commercial food processor may be pushing the definition somewhat. I am someone who has spend most of my working life in I.T. and who is looking for something to keep me from going stir crazy during forthcoming retirement. I have been producing and selling (though more often giving away!) BBQ and smoked products to friends and family for many years and am now just turning it into a more commercial venture. While I am still earning a regular wage I am getting all my equipment built and my product preparation sorted. I do rather like eating what I produce though so much of it will still be for home consumption.

 :beercheer:

post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Johnson View Post
 

... I always throw the leftover carcass under the broiler to crisp up a bit and then boil till reduced by half and then fill up to top and boil back down to half again.

 

... Safety is the #1 concern when canning and I NEVER take short cuts. I wish you the best of luck and if you have any questions feel free to send my a p.m.  

 

...Oh yeah 1 more thing its addictive and you will be always needing more jars. I had to build a pantry to hold all my stuff.

 

Thanks for your post Mike. The reluctance to throw away left over carcasses is exactly why I am exploring this avenue too.

 

Yes, safety must always be the #1 consideration though it does not hurt to question established practice especially when looking to vary the conditions from those under which the practice was originally established. It is not about taking shortcuts but more about exploring the possibly of making established process more efficient - akin to the industrial revolution. The US Department of Agriculture documentation is the best I have to go on at the moment and so I will however if you don't ask questions you will never extent current knowledge.

 

Thanks for the offer of PM - I am sure that I will be picking your brains very soon Thumbs Up

 

The jar storage space is already a problem here but in a slightly different way. I have already filled up all my fridge and freezer space with stock and so have had to resort to throwing carcasses away again !!! 

 

Cheers

 

Wade

post #25 of 28

Absolutely has nothing to do with cooking and food to be eaten, just interesting piece of information:

 

Hospital autoclaves to sterilize material, "121 °C (250 °F) at 100 kPa (15 psi) above atmospheric pressure for 15 minutes . " in a steam filled autoclave. This is possible perhaps it is because the items being sterilized are mostly small and metallic.

 

 

dcarch

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post
 

Absolutely has nothing to do with cooking and food to be eaten, just interesting piece of information:

 

Hospital autoclaves to sterilize material, "121 °C (250 °F) at 100 kPa (15 psi) above atmospheric pressure for 15 minutes . " in a steam filled autoclave. This is possible perhaps it is because the items being sterilized are mostly small and metallic.

 

 

dcarch

 

Yes.....  also because they are sterilizing the surface....  surgery tools etc...  I don't believe they sterilize porous materials, but I could be wrong...  Have been before, will be again....  

 

 

Dave

post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 

A Quick update. The pressure canner arrived today. I did not get a chance to test it but I hope to over the next couple of days. I have also been exploring options for bacteriological lab testing with the help of my friendly Environmental Health Officer and was very surprised how inexpensive it is here in the UK. The cost of testing a sample is only £18 (~$29).

Following Dave's comments regarding possible plasticizer leaching I am also getting costs for having samples tested for this as well.

If anyone is interested I will post up some Qview of the initial canner testing using the pouches.

post #28 of 28

Sure, I'm interested in what you are doing.

 

Tom

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