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Had a general question

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

When smoking meats, is it true that wood should only be used in the first half of the total cooking time?

post #2 of 10

That would be false. Use smoke as long as you want

post #3 of 10

If it's true, then I have a huge problem 'cause I cook in a stick burner:biggrin:

 

Some say meat will not absorb smoke for more than 4 hours or so and you can quit adding chips/chunks to a charcoal smoker.  The smoke ring is over half an inch deep on my last Brisky.  One more reason I'm glad I graduated to a SFB stick burner

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by radio View Post
 

If it's true, then I have a huge problem 'cause I cook in a stick burner:biggrin:

 

Some say meat will not absorb smoke for more than 4 hours or so and you can quit adding chips/chunks to a charcoal smoker.  The smoke ring is over half an inch deep on my last Brisky.  One more reason I'm glad I graduated to a SFB stick burner

 

 

Those people would be wrong the meat will continue to take in smoke but the smoke ring stops forming . Nice looking brisket

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Ok cool, trying my luck with a 5 1/2 Boston butt tomorrow and was wondering. Thanks a lot!

post #6 of 10

If you foil then you don't need to apply smoke during that but the rest of the time I would add smoke

post #7 of 10

I think it depends what your doing.  When foiled, the meat gets the heat, not the smoke.  If you have other things in there smoking, who cares if say your doing a 3 - 2 - 1 smoke on some ribs, you get to the foil part and while in the un-foiled part you added a brisket at the 1 hour mark, you still would need smoke while the ribs are foiled.  The hard known fact is above 140 degrees, the meat will take any more smoke.

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/137096/when-does-meat-accept-smoke-the-best

post #8 of 10

It also depends on how strong a smokey taste you want.

 

 

Chris

post #9 of 10

On my very first smoke - spare ribs - I used hickory wood chunks on top of my burning charcoal, throughout the whole smoke.

My wife thought they were too smokey tasting, so the next time I only used the wood lumps for like the first couple of hours or so.

She liked them much better that time, still have a smoke flavor but not a real strong one. So I have adapted to doing them that way now.

 

I think it is just a matter of individual  personal preference, for the particular kind of meat being smoked, and the particular kind of wood being used along with type - pellets - chips - lumps - splits.

Experimentation is probably best way to determine.

post #10 of 10

It's a personal choice but making that perfect Thin Blue Smoke should give good flavor without bitterness. I am one of those that believe, " It's a Smoker! If there is meat in the chamber you should be making Smoke." I use an AMNPS and have yet to get anywhere near what my family would say is too much smoke,even on a 14 hour Butt no foil...JJ

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