or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › General Discussion › Making the rub stick to a pork shoulder
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Making the rub stick to a pork shoulder

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

What can I use besides mustard to make the rub stick? My wife does not like condiments like that. I told her she would not notice but no go. Also, I have seen on Que shows pit masters saying after the rub sets. What does that mean? I have seen them layering on the rub and not rubbing it in. A layer of rub. Is that how they get that mahogany color? 

post #2 of 17

You could use olive oil.

post #3 of 17
I gave up on binders a long time ago. I wash the meat in cold water then pat dry with some paper towels then apply the rub. I don't really rub it I just sprinkle it on and then pat it in with my hand. This gets it right on the meat without some type of barrier and it sticks really well.
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Eb View Post

What can I use besides mustard to make the rub stick? My wife does not like condiments like that. I told her she would not notice but no go. Also, I have seen on Que shows pit masters saying after the rub sets. What does that mean? I have seen them layering on the rub and not rubbing it in. A layer of rub. Is that how they get that mahogany color? 

 

when the rub sets...the flavor of the rub will soak into the meat and help flavor it...usually done overnight or for a few hours...personally i haven't noticed a difference in flavor either way..letting it sit for 12 hours or for 1/2 an hour....the color does come from the seasonings, misting with apple juice/cider/vinegar with a bit of dry rub mixed in will also aid in the coloring, also some of the coloring will come from the type of wood you use for smoke flavor...as for helping the rub stick...anything from EVOO, worcestershire sauce, A1 sauce....anything works

post #5 of 17

almost any "wet" coating will allow the rub to stick.  Olive oil is good, you can even do a light basting of apple juice.  Within a short time, the dry rub soaks up the moisture and becomes wet - which causes it to be that dark color.

 

I prefer plain old yellow mustard, as it does not run like olive oil or apple juice.  My wife hates mustard also - refuses to eat it.  So the first time I used it to set a rub, I did not let her see what I was doing.  Then the next time, I told her and since she had eaten it previously, she believed me that there is no mustard taste left at all.

 

- Dave

post #6 of 17

I don't use anything to make the rub stick but like Dave I do wash it down with cold water, pat it dry and then apply the rub.  After applying the rub I wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate over night, then before putting the meat on the smoker I add another application of rub.

 

The only time I would use olive oil or anything else for an adhesive would be if I didn't prepare far enough in advance to let the rub set on the meat.

 

Good luck,

 

Bill

post #7 of 17
I usually use mustard too , but every so often I will forget and start applying the rub and just the natural moisture of the ribs or pork butt will attract the rub. But a few drops of corn oil or olive oil would work too....or even Worcestershire sauce!
post #8 of 17

I think the natural stickiness of the meat...of course after rinsing.....works well enough for me.  I either rub the night before and let it sit in the fridge...or just before plopping in the cooker.  Depends on the time I have....or the brain power to remember.  biggrin.gif

 

Kat

post #9 of 17

Hit it with some salt about 10 minutes before the dry rub.  The salt in the dry rub will pull moisture out of the meat by osmosis, which will cause the dry rub to stick.  Or frankly, most rubs will have enough salt in them to do that job for you.  I've put it directly on the meat with no oil, mustard, what have you, and it works just fine.  You just need to let it stand for a minute or two to pull some of the moisture out to goop up the rub.

post #10 of 17

There is a reason its called rub and not "pat". Wash it, dry it, rub it in, don't just sprinkle it on. Massage it in. Then wrap it in plastic for 24 to 48 hours. Then when ready for the pit is when ya want to coat it with the seasoning again heavy. The first rub will cause the meat to release fluids making it a natural binder when you are ready. That's my way. But everyone has their own way.

post #11 of 17
yeh im right there with the cold water rinse and rub it down. its not rocket science. lol. the mustard and whatever else is just useless in my book, it does exactly what the water rinse does. the flavor is gunna come from my rub not a mustard or A1, or whatever else slathering. just more mess to clean up. lol.
post #12 of 17

 

 

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynN View Post

I think the natural stickiness of the meat...of course after rinsing.....works well enough for me.  I either rub the night before and let it sit in the fridge...or just before plopping in the cooker.  Depends on the time I have....or the brain power to remember.  biggrin.gif

 

Kat

 

True Dat!

 

The salt and sugar will pull moisture from the meat creating a syrupy or slather like consistency.

However, this does not work very well on fat, as the rub can not pull enough moisture from it to create a gooey ooey slather.

 

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SQWIB View Post

 

 

Lea & Perrins and Soy are for your rub and that fine cajun whiskey, Jacque Daniels is for the cook, right? What do ya do with the soda pop?

post #15 of 17

 I've tried mustard, olive oil, and various other concoctions including nothing at all.  Other than appearance I can’t say I have ever been able to tell the difference, but I generally stick (pun intended) with one rub.  Other rubs may interact with some glue differently, and on different types of meat. So my advice is use whatever makes the little lady happy.  I generally use a mix of 1/3 honey and 2/3 mustard just because it makes me feel good.

post #16 of 17

Nothing extra here. I "wash" it in cold water, pat dry and sprinkle a nice coating of the rub on patting it as I go. Seems to work well for me.

post #17 of 17

I typically inject and let it sit in the fridge overnight.  By the next morning some of the juice I've injected has leaked out so I flop it around in that and then sprinkle lots and lots of the rub mixture on and just pat it down.  I did mustard on a pork loin one time and it was too "goopy" ... I much prefer a lightly wet or patted dry pork butt to work with.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › General Discussion › Making the rub stick to a pork shoulder