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Coldspot Smoker Build

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
I want to make a smoker out of this refrigerator, but I need to know if I can use the old insulation according to the web it is fiberglass. I also want to make it run on charcoal, any ideas? 1375635230353.jpg 1020k .jpg file
Edited by Smokin George - 8/4/13 at 11:00am
post #2 of 42
Can't see the picture, follow this tutorial for uploading pictures right into your posts:
http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/a/how-to-upload-a-photo-q-view-to-your-post
post #3 of 42
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help, S2K9K
post #4 of 42

As cheap as fiberglass is, I would put new in it, in case there is some mold......

 

Dave

post #5 of 42
Thread Starter 
Can I use the pink stuff from Home Depot
post #6 of 42

George, You sure can......   Are you planning on replacing the door liner ??  the light blue colored liner ??  I think it would be a good idea...  looks like some sort of plastic.....   I rebuilt a fridge like yours and made it into a smoker....    I used some 24 gauge cold rolled steel or something close to that for an inside door skin.....   If you do replace it, there are a few "tricks" that save a lot of time and make the door fit perfect...   

I, like all members of the forum, are here to help so don't be afraid to ask  questions......    

 

Dave

post #7 of 42
Thread Starter 
Yes Dave I am going to replace the inner liner with metal. I am goin to use the old liner as a templet for the new liner. On the insulation do I need to take the paper off the pink insulation ? Also I am using a char-griller fire box for heat.
post #8 of 42
They sell it with out the paper. I split the thickness of the insulation in half and lined it with that
post #9 of 42

George, morning......   when you replace the door liner, lay it flat, inside up......  stretch strings caddy-corner from corner to corner.....  where the strings cross in the middle of the door, they should just touch.....  If they don't, shim the low string until they do touch.....    Then fasten the new inner skin......   that makes sure the door is in plane and it will fit perfect.....    I struggled with a door skin for hours until I tried this trick.... 

Be sure to "cradle" the door when starting this task so it doesn't move when installing the new inner skin.......   I used self drilling/tapping screws to install the skin... pre drill the skin first..... and possibly the door.....  baked enamel is a glass material and very hard to drill......

 

Dave

post #10 of 42
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the info Papa Chops.

post #11 of 42
Thread Starter 

I found this on a different web site. I like cook with lump and wood so this what I am going with. what do you think about this?

post #12 of 42
Thread Starter 

Not sure where to put the exhaust smoke stack. I see that some put it on top and some on the back? How big should I make it 4" 6"?

post #13 of 42

I have a very similar build. My stack is on top and is 4".  I run 220 electric so can't really help on the charcoal question. I might say though, if it's the charcoal taste your after, use a few briquettes inside on the near bottom. Electric is so much easier to keep the constant temps needed. I cut a rectangle piece out of the bottom and left the lower back off for great airflow. The unit sits against my deck, so I don't get gusts of air coming in it.

Todd's amazn smoker trays provide my smoke.

Good luck with your build

post #14 of 42
Thread Starter 

I am going to put the smoke stack on top and have it down inside the smoker 3 to 4 inch's and against the back wall. I have picked up all the metal for the door and where the plastic was. My goal this weekend is to have the door done,shelf's and side smoker box done. 

post #15 of 42

George, morning......  A stack on top of the smoker will drip condensate inside the smoker....    think about putting the exhaust out the back to eliminate that problem....  angle it down a bit so condensate runs away from the smoker......    Dave

post #16 of 42

Dave, I agree with the condensation. To solve that problem for my build, I build a simple metal cover that fits snuggly on my stack. After the smoking is done I slip it on. So far after three years I haven't had a condensation problem. This also keeps the bugs out of it too. icon_wink.gif

post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by archernut View Post

Dave, I agree with the condensation. To solve that problem for my build, I build a simple metal cover that fits snuggly on my stack. After the smoking is done I slip it on. So far after three years I haven't had a condensation problem. This also keeps the bugs out of it too. icon_wink.gif

You don't get any condensate during the smoking process ???   How do you stop that condition ??? I get condensate around the exhaust port on my MES 30 when smoking meat that has any moisture in it......

 

Dave

post #18 of 42
Thread Starter 
Dave I did put the smoke stack on the back of the smoker. I wil post pic's soon, Family wanted to go out for ice cream.
post #19 of 42
Thread Starter 
]Made some progress today, I made the hole for the smoke stack and put in shelf support brackets.
post #20 of 42
Thread Starter 

Picture With side box
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