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Temp to high

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Can't keep my temp below 300-350. What am I doing wrong or need to fix?
post #2 of 13
Keep exhaust fully open,close off intakes to lower temps,open to raise, take out some of the hot coals or wood what ever u r using, when adding wood add small pcs not big that way u won't have temp spikes. Need little more info on what your using this is just basic all around info
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

Sorry my previous post was from my iPad.  Not able to post pictures from the iPad (or I couldn't figure it out).

 

I was using a CharBroil offset smoker cooking with a mixture of lump and briquet charcoal.  I built a charcoal basket, to hold more coals, and for the fire to last longer.  The only thing that I accomplished was higher temps.  I did exactly what you suggested: open stack, closed intake, and the temp wouldn't drop below 300 until the coals were mostly consumed. icon_sad.gif

 

I thought about trying to add an aluminum bread pan with water, blocking the hole between the fire and cooking area, but didn't get that done.  Next time, I'll have that ready as an option.

 

What would you recommend to maintain low temp, yet conserve coals, making the fire last more than 3.

 

The venison roast turned out well.  Wished it was more moist.  Also did a dozen eggs, and they were done in an hour.  It was fun.

 

 

Smoker modifications #1

 

Open to fire box. Aluminum foil covering bottom.

post #4 of 13
I'm thinking you have air leak issues... If intake vent was closed and temps still rising.. it's still getting air from somewhere.. these lower end units are notorious air leakers...
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

The intake, wheel vent, is very lose.  Guess I'll need to try to figure how to tighten it up.

post #6 of 13

Put a bolt and spring for tension on the wheel intake vent ...   The firebox door may need some sealing and the connection between the firebox and cook chamber could use some sealing....    Air leaks are your worst enemy when it come to temp control.....   Oh yeah, and the cook chamber door needs sealing too....   

 

 

Dave

post #7 of 13
the doors are more suspect than the vent... do a search for mods on your brand... there will be many
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

Put a bolt and spring for tension on the wheel intake vent ...   The firebox door may need some sealing and the connection between the firebox and cook chamber could use some sealing....    Air leaks are your worst enemy when it come to temp control.....   Oh yeah, and the cook chamber door needs sealing too....   

 

 

Dave

Great idea but it might be one of those vent intakes that has the fixed pin holding it on...If that's the case just drill it out and do the bolt and spring like Dave suggested. 

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

Yeah it is a fixed pin wheel design, but I'll see what I can do to tighten it up.  Not ready to do too much sealing on the cooking chamber, because I still use it as a grill too.

post #10 of 13

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Edited by Black - 10/16/13 at 5:50pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by orenglin View Post

Yeah it is a fixed pin wheel design, but I'll see what I can do to tighten it up.  Not ready to do too much sealing on the cooking chamber, because I still use it as a grill too.

when they said seal the door.. they don't mean to seal it shut.. just to seal it from drawing air threw the cracks... it will still work as a grill
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Very helpful tip. Fire lasted longer and was easier to regulate.
Thanks!
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by orenglin View Post

Can't keep my temp below 300-350. What am I doing wrong or need to fix?

Indians always said "white man build big fire, burn one side, freeze the other."

"Indian build small fire, save wood, stand over, stay warm."

I'd build a smaller fire, then add coals in a couple hours to maintain.

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