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Is there such thing as too much smoke? - Page 2

post #21 of 23

I have used mango for years...no one and I mean no one has gotten sick. Most of the people that are senstitive to mango are sensitive to the skin of the fruit.
 

post #22 of 23

There has to be a good supply of Orange Wood in So. FL. It yields a flavorful yet light smoke. Look for other fruit and nut woods as well...JJ

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by crockadale View Post

I have used mango for years...no one and I mean no one has gotten sick. Most of the people that are sensitive to mango are sensitive to the skin of the fruit.
 

Crockdale, morning....  I am posting this link, not to dispute you, but to shed some light on the "possibilities" of the effects of using mango and mango wood...   Your statement does not give credence "Mango is safe", like the statement "I have made jerky for years without using cure #1 and never got botulism" does not make jerky safe to eat without using cure #1......

 

Evidently mango wood and the skin contain "stuff" that can cause some problems......  Safety practices should be followed, but that is up to the individual.....   we are NOT the safety police but try to educate our followers on this forum, with facts....

 

Judge for yourself about "potential problems" associated with the toxins in certain parts of the mango... feel free to search the definitions of words associated with the toxicity of the mango...  Dave

 

http://themangofactory.com/mango-articles2/mango-toxicity-to-hypersensitive-persons/

Mango Toxicity to Hypersensitive Persons

by DOUG on JUNE 17, 2009

The sap which exudes from the stalk close to the base of the fruit is somewhat milky at first, also yellowish-resinous. It becomes pale-yellow and translucent when dried. It contains mangiferen, resinous acid, mangiferic acid, and the resinol, mangiferol. It, like the sap of the trunk and branches and the skin of the unripe fruit, is a potent skin irritant, and capable of blistering the skin of the normal individual. As with poison ivy, there is typically a delayed reaction. Hypersensitive persons may react with considerable swelling of the eyelids, the face, and other parts of the body. They may not be able to handle, peel, or eat mangos or any food containing mango flesh or juice. A good precaution is to use one knife to peel the mango, and a clean knife to slice the flesh to avoid contaminating the flesh with any of the resin in the peel.

The leaves contain the glucoside, mangiferine. In India, cows were formerly fed mango leaves to obtain from their urine euxanthic acid which is rich yellow and has been used as a dye. Since continuous intake of the leaves may be fatal, the practice has been outlawed.

When mango trees are in bloom, it is not uncommon for people to suffer itching around the eyes, facial swelling and respiratory difficulty, even though there is no airborne pollen. The few pollen grains are large and they tend to adhere to each other even in dry weather. The stigma is small and not designed to catch windborne pollen. The irritant is probably the vaporized essential oil of the flowers which contains the sesquiterpene alcohol, mangiferol, and the ketone, mangiferone.

Mango wood should never be used in fireplaces or for cooking fuel, as its smoke is highly irritant.

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