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Old Country BBQ Pits Wrangler Smoker Review - Page 15

post #281 of 307
delicious - i modified your recipe just a bit for some birds today - and rubbed them down with some maple syrup first. had to tamp down the spice a little for the youngin and wife. they are looking pretty good, had to dodge some rain moving in so cooking something quick(ish)
TBS so blue its almost invisible


Just put on


About an hour in



Holdin steady at 255, i like to cook a little higher with chicken, then last 20 mins i bring it up even higher, like 275-280 to crispin up the skin a little bit.

update - final product


Edited by jcrevz - 9/11/15 at 2:35pm
post #282 of 307

Looking good jcrevz!  I've actually started spatchcocking all chicken and turkeys that I smoke.  I found it makes it a lot easier for me to get the even temps I'm looking for.

 

Here's a couple of links for turkeys that I did.  The first one was my very first time to ever try smoking a turkey.  And, it was great.  The second one was last Thanksgiving, when I smoked 2 huge turkey breasts.  Turkey seems to really take the smoke well, and when it's tender and juicy, it's hard to beat.  I've always disliked turkey because I've always ate them at Thanksgiving or Christmas when someone in the family would bake one in the oven.  They were always too dry and tasteless for me.  But, now that I learned how to smoke them, I'm a big turkey fan.

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/152563/spatchcocked-smoked-turkey-on-old-country-wrangler-smoker

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/173453/thanksgiving-spatchcocked-turkey-breasts-on-my-old-country-wrangler-smoker#post_1273643

 

At Christmas last year, I smoked a turkey breast and a rum-injected ham at the same time. This pic was from then, and the turkey won out on being the tastiest. 

 

post #283 of 307

The Pecos is $100 cheaper and the surface area is a bit larger I think.  It also does not have the top rack he spoke of.  I went with the pecos because I never use those top racks in my BBQ and didnt figure I would on here. I would rather have the larger surface area  Other than those differences, I didn't see anything.  I like my Pecos.

post #284 of 307

I just want to thank MickHLR and Iphamiton1 for all the great reviews on the Wrangler. Because of your great advice, I am now a proud new owner of a Wrangler. I have only cooked a rack of ribs and some chicken thighs so far and they came out so much better than anything I ever cooked in my MES. I went with the MES because I have issues with temp control. The meats are great that I smoked in it but...NOT ENOUGH SMOKE. I took a chance with going with the Wrangler knowing I have that problem, but so far I really did not have too many problems other than the Oklahoma wind. I am going to get the tuning plates made as soon as I can find someone to make them for me. 

 

Next on the menu......Brisket.

 

Thanks again.

 

Happy Smoking

post #285 of 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by oktorb View Post
 

I just want to thank MickHLR and Iphamiton1 for all the great reviews on the Wrangler. Because of your great advice, I am now a proud new owner of a Wrangler. I have only cooked a rack of ribs and some chicken thighs so far and they came out so much better than anything I ever cooked in my MES. I went with the MES because I have issues with temp control. The meats are great that I smoked in it but...NOT ENOUGH SMOKE. I took a chance with going with the Wrangler knowing I have that problem, but so far I really did not have too many problems other than the Oklahoma wind. I am going to get the tuning plates made as soon as I can find someone to make them for me. 

 

Next on the menu......Brisket.

 

Thanks again.

 

Happy Smoking

 

Thanks OKTORB, and you are most welcome.  This will be my last post on anything about the Wrangler.  Even though it is a dang good smoker, and I loved smoking on it, I've been using my 22.5 Weber Smokey Mountain for almost everything here lately...due to the ease of use.  And, I'm getting too old to spend my weekends chasing temps on any offset.  The WSM is by-far the easiest smoker I've ever used, and I've been smoking meat for 35 years.  So, I put my Wrangler and a Weber propane grill on Craig's list and sold them both.  My patio looks a lot better with just a 22.5 WSM and a 26.75 Weber Kettle.  Anything I could ever want to cook, I can cook on one of those cookers. 

 

Good luck with that brisket...the Wrangler spits out a pretty dang good brisket. 

post #286 of 307

Just ordered this online as there is not a Academy sports near me. My question is, does it come with a way to remove ashes? As in a shovel or scoop? How easy is it to clean out the ashes?

post #287 of 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
 

Just ordered this online as there is not a Academy sports near me. My question is, does it come with a way to remove ashes? As in a shovel or scoop? How easy is it to clean out the ashes?

 

Yooper, I just always used my little fireplace shovel.  It fits perfectly under the wood grate to dig those ashes out.  And, you'll learn when doing a long smoke, if that temp starts getting hard to stay up there, you probably need to scoop out the ashes.  It's a great smoker for the price.

post #288 of 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by MickHLR View Post

Yooper, I just always used my little fireplace shovel.  It fits perfectly under the wood grate to dig those ashes out.  And, you'll learn when doing a long smoke, if that temp starts getting hard to stay up there, you probably need to scoop out the ashes.  It's a great smoker for the price.

It's very easy to clean out. I purchased an inexpensive ash rake on Amazon which had a flat edge. I put it on my grinder and ground the edge to the same diameter as the fire box. Then you just reach in and pull the ashes out into a galvanized bucket. Cleans out real well.
post #289 of 307

Guys-

Since I store mine outside (with a cover) I knew that I may have some rusting issues.  I had not used the Wrangler since January, boy was I disappointed to pull the cover this past Friday.  Looks like I will be sandblasting and completely repainting mine.  I guess for the money you can't expect great paint, but jeez....less than two years and rust everywhere.  The only areas with no rust are where I did my mods and repainted after grinding and welding.

 

I am planning on blasting it then using high temp header paint.  Anybody repaint theirs?

 

 

Smoke ON!

 

- Jason

post #290 of 307

mine is also stored outdoors with a cover, got some rusting but i think it adds character - and nobody is out criticizing my rig when they are stuffing their mouths with amazing grub

post #291 of 307

hey there. do u still have your wrangler? for fathers day my family bought me one.. i was looking at your tuning plates, i have cut 4 pieces by your 4"x15.75" and comparing tour 3 pieces yours seem to almost reach length of smoking chamber.. all 4 of mine still seems i can fit 1 more.  yours look wider than 4".. thanks im still adjusting to this smoker never had one with thicker steel:xrocker:

post #292 of 307

Yes I also have the Old Country "Wranger" series offset grill and smoker.  I went back to store where I originally bought the smoker and they had the correct cover for it .   I Love the cover and smoker 

post #293 of 307

I own Old Country Wrangler offset BBQ pit. Personally I believe its a good quality pit for the money. A few things bothered me about the pit.  I own a 8ft  reverse flow off set custom pit on a trailer constructed from 3\8" steel I call "La Ruca". The Old Country is constructed pretty well. Mine, I changed some stuff around, built a adjustable tuning plate to level the heat on both sides of the cooking chamber, got rid of them junky metal wheels and installed some nice 400 lb rated 10" hard rubber mag wheel style tires on all four corners. Got rid of that flimsy metal drop down shelf and installed a nice sturdy stainless steel shelf. I installed (2) 2 1\2" tel tru thermometers, one high on the cook chamber (the above shelf) the other lower about 6" off the lower shelf. Installed some wood stove door insulation 3\4" by 1\4" on the door of the cooking chamber.

 

I read a lot of grips on them on the internet, some saying they can not manage the heat to be consistent. They leak and do not hold heat. Plus these are most likely the same folks that "if your look'n you aint cook'n".  I have no problem maintaining consistent heat in the cooking chamber. I do not peek at my meat, my cook chamber door is closed at all times unless I'm basting or spritz'n. To me I figure these folks do not know what their doing or can not solve (fix) simple problem to minor hick-up in their pit. But what do you expect for a 500.00 plus dollar pit, I guess these are the same folks that expect the same quality as a Lang or Jambo cooker. LOL! I run my pit's (both of them) with the fire box door open and I adjust the door opening or closing to maintain my fire. I do not use the damper. I learnt this from old timers on their pit's cooking with them. I've been doing this the better part of 20 plus yrs and produce some good BBQ.

 

Most of the time I run my temperatures anywhere 235 & 250 on either pits. Every once in a while I run 325 for a faster cook. I can maintain that consistently throughout long cooks @ 235 to 250 or medium cooks if I'm running hotter like 325. I started out yrs ago with an really old Brinkman tin can off set pit, and got pretty dang good with it doing long cooks & medium cooks. But them tin cans require tons of time maintaining temperature, stoking that fire. Then I bought my custom built trailer offset reverse flow pit 16 yrs ago. I find that good pits require less time in fire management. I wanted a smaller pit, a decent off set actual stick burner (not a charcoal burner). It didn't matter if it was a traditional direct flow or reverse flow. I just wanted a small pit that wouldn't break the bank and had thick enough metal that it would maintain the heat in the fire box and cook chamber. Then I stumbled onto the Old Country Pits, & I looked at them and bought one 2 months ago.

 

This winter I plan on media blasting the out side of the pit and re-coating the exterior in a high temperature ceramic coating that's good up to 1400 degrees. This is the same coating I put on NFA guns (full auto)

 

I have to say I like the Old Country Pit, I consider it a true stick burner pit, the firebox is large enough to accommodate 16" White Oak, Post Oak & Hickory logs I cut here on my farm. The thickness of the metal is satisfactory at best for holding good heat for the small size of the pit.

post #294 of 307
I've had my Wrangler for almost a year. I've done about the same mods. Sealed doors and made 4 tuning plates. My temps hold between 10-15 degrees from one end to the other. Cook with door open and adjust temp with amount of fuel. I love mine!

post #295 of 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonArkie View Post
 

I own Old Country Wrangler offset BBQ pit. Personally I believe its a good quality pit for the money. A few things bothered me about the pit.  I own a 8ft  reverse flow off set custom pit on a trailer constructed from 3\8" steel I call "La Ruca". The Old Country is constructed pretty well. Mine, I changed some stuff around, built a adjustable tuning plate to level the heat on both sides of the cooking chamber, got rid of them junky metal wheels and installed some nice 400 lb rated 10" hard rubber mag wheel style tires on all four corners. Got rid of that flimsy metal drop down shelf and installed a nice sturdy stainless steel shelf. I installed (2) 2 1\2" tel tru thermometers, one high on the cook chamber (the above shelf) the other lower about 6" off the lower shelf. Installed some wood stove door insulation 3\4" by 1\4" on the door of the cooking chamber.

 

I read a lot of grips on them on the internet, some saying they can not manage the heat to be consistent. They leak and do not hold heat. Plus these are most likely the same folks that "if your look'n you aint cook'n".  I have no problem maintaining consistent heat in the cooking chamber. I do not peek at my meat, my cook chamber door is closed at all times unless I'm basting or spritz'n. To me I figure these folks do not know what their doing or can not solve (fix) simple problem to minor hick-up in their pit. But what do you expect for a 500.00 plus dollar pit, I guess these are the same folks that expect the same quality as a Lang or Jambo cooker. LOL! I run my pit's (both of them) with the fire box door open and I adjust the door opening or closing to maintain my fire. I do not use the damper. I learnt this from old timers on their pit's cooking with them. I've been doing this the better part of 20 plus yrs and produce some good BBQ.

 

Most of the time I run my temperatures anywhere 235 & 250 on either pits. Every once in a while I run 325 for a faster cook. I can maintain that consistently throughout long cooks @ 235 to 250 or medium cooks if I'm running hotter like 325. I started out yrs ago with an really old Brinkman tin can off set pit, and got pretty dang good with it doing long cooks & medium cooks. But them tin cans require tons of time maintaining temperature, stoking that fire. Then I bought my custom built trailer offset reverse flow pit 16 yrs ago. I find that good pits require less time in fire management. I wanted a smaller pit, a decent off set actual stick burner (not a charcoal burner). It didn't matter if it was a traditional direct flow or reverse flow. I just wanted a small pit that wouldn't break the bank and had thick enough metal that it would maintain the heat in the fire box and cook chamber. Then I stumbled onto the Old Country Pits, & I looked at them and bought one 2 months ago.

 

This winter I plan on media blasting the out side of the pit and re-coating the exterior in a high temperature ceramic coating that's good up to 1400 degrees. This is the same coating I put on NFA guns (full auto)

 

I have to say I like the Old Country Pit, I consider it a true stick burner pit, the firebox is large enough to accommodate 16" White Oak, Post Oak & Hickory logs I cut here on my farm. The thickness of the metal is satisfactory at best for holding good heat for the small size of the pit.

I agree with you.  I also have gone to using the door to control my fire/heat.  I plan on blasting mine this winter, I was going to use high temp header paint, but just learned of the ceramic paint.  I will use that.  Question for you: when you switched out your tires/wheels, did you have to extend the front legs?  The wheels I have found have been either bigger or smaller, both cases would require me to adjust the legs.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Smoke ON!

 

- Jason

post #296 of 307

Well after reading this entire thing, I'll make my first post as well.  I bought a used Wrangler about two months ago.  It didn't start off well because I ended up breaking my left wrist while trying to unload it from the back of my truck with a co-worker.  He dropped his end (stack end) sooner and harder that I expected and I still had ahold of the firebox end.  It tipped over backward and I went with it.  Broke my dang wrist trying to break my fall.  Ugh!!  lol  

 

Anyway,  I like this little pit but it does seem to run hot.  My splits I bought were way to big and with a broken wrist I couldn't cut or resplit them.  Finally after several weeks I was able to buy a Kindling Cracker from Northern Tool (I'll post pics).  If you've not seen one, YOU NEED TO!!  It's awesome!!  Works great!!

 

I done several briskets, butts, chicken, and grilled some bratwurst and steaks over the firebox.   I just NEED to get some tuning plates cut.  Or debated buying a convection plate from Horizon.

 

I also tried the stock firebox grate as a tuning plate. It did okay I guess, but I'll just have some cut.  

 

IMG_7155.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by Big Swole - 10/13/16 at 6:18pm
post #297 of 307
Okay, well I guess this forum does not act like 90% of the other forms out there and will not post my pictures with the image code from Photobucket.

Anybody want to give me a heads up as to how this form works with pictures and Photobucket versus the other forums?

ON EDIT!!!!! - Well I finally figured it out. See pics above.
Edited by Big Swole - 10/13/16 at 6:19pm
post #298 of 307
Got me some nice thick tuning plates cut today for $25. SCORE!!




post #299 of 307

Quick question.  How is the drain on this smoker?  Is there a valve or hole down there or something?


Edited by josheaton - 10/20/16 at 2:42pm
post #300 of 307
Quote:
Originally Posted by josheaton View Post

Quick question.  How is the drain on this smoker?  Is there a valve or hole down there or something?

The wrangler has a hole in a hook for a bucket. The Brazos I just bought has a piece of 1 inch threaded pipe that you can install a ball valve on. I assume the Pecos has the hole and hook like the wrangler.
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