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Double Smoked Hams---Times 4 (Step by Step) - Page 12

post #221 of 237

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 

 

That's really Great to Hear----Thank You!!

 

Bear

 

 

Thank You Bones!!

 

We had a Great Christmas!

 

I'm real glad to hear you're enjoying my Double Smoked Ham method !!

 

 

Bear

post #222 of 237
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
 

A few notes from my Christmas day double smoke.

 

I read all of Bear's posts about double-smoked ham, as well as a dozen other threads on the subject here in the forum. I used a Kirland/Costco spiral ham someone gave to me (after he took a few slices of the ham for himself). Used my new AMPS with Jeff's "Pitmaster" blend filling just the first row (3 hour smoke). I put that into my MES 30". I didn't apply any glaze until after the first 90 minutes, and during that initial time I smoked at a relatively low (200 degree) temp. I then applied the glaze and smoked for the last 90 minutes at 270 degrees. Pulled at exactly the three hour mark. The internal temp was only 115 degrees, but I had no desire to get it to 130 or 140. As Jeff pointed out in his video (I've provided a link below, in case you haven't watched it), there really isn't much need to monitor or worry about temps when the meat has already been cooked.

 

This is about adding smoke, not cooking.

 

 

 

Things I learned:

 

1. I don't think there is much need for heat. Since I am using the AMPS, I don't have to get the MES hot in order to produce smoke. Because the ham is fully cooked and cured, there really isn't any reason to get it hot, unless I want to serve it hot immediately after removing from the smoker. As for "setting" the glaze, see my notes below.

 

Next time I will do the whole smoke at 160 degrees because the higher the temp the longer I have to wait before putting the ham into the fridge. I could do a cold smoke, but I don't think the cold smoke tastes quite the same (expert smokers, feel free to contradict this neophyte's assumption).

 

2. Next time I will not use any glaze during the smoke. I did some research on glazes, but only after I'd finished the whole thing. What I found out is that "Honeybaked" hams use a glaze that is carmelized using a blowtorch. This makes a lot of sense to me, and I think would create a MUCH better result, assuming you want a glaze (I note that quite a few people who have posted in this thread and elsewhere don't like glazes on their hams). In addition, when I added the glaze after 90 minutes, as I pressed it into the very warm exterior, it cause the exterior fat to mush around and deform. I could have avoided that by putting the glaze on before the smoke, but I think that might have reduced the smoke penetration. So, in the future I will smoke without any glaze, and then put the glaze on after the smoke has finished, and the ham exterior has cooled for 15-20 minutes. I will also slightly dilute the glaze so I can "paint" it on rather than rub it on, in order to minimize any damage to the exterior.

 

3. Next time I will use a glaze without cloves. Yes, I know that they are the traditional spice for hams, but I like cloves in cookies, not hams. Yes, I am strange. Once I put on the glaze, I will use the blowtorch. I have always like the Honeybaked taste and now that (I think) I know how their glaze is created, I'd like to try to duplicate that, but with the added benefit of having a really nice smoke on a much cheaper ham (Kirkland/Costco hams are about 1/4 the cost of a Honeybaked product).

 

Finally, on an unrelated note, at some point I need to post what I learned about lighting the 5x8 AMPS. I've read a hundred posts on this, and watched a few videos, and learned a lot. However, I still had problems, and was ready to give up. However, because I have faith in the people in this forum, and many of them say this is the greatest thing since smoked sliced bread, I kept after it. After a few failures (I just got it a week ago) I discovered that using a good heat gun, but without any torch or other ignition, produces an absolutely perfect result. It is repeatable, with no question about whether the smoke is going to extinguish. It is really easy, and the AMPS is ready to go in only about 5-7 minutes instead of 10-15 minutes. I'll try to get around to posting a video, probably sometime next week, or whenever I do my next smoke.

 

Thanks Bear for providing such a great guide on how to do this, and I hope you don't mind my adding a few twists and variations of my own!

 

Thank You John,

Thanks for the report.

It ALL sounds Great !!

 

A couple things to Note:

My "Double Smoked Hams" Step by Step is about "Smoking a Smoked Ham a second time AND Heating it at the same time", not just adding smoke. That's why I take it up to safe eating temp.

 

Also: There already is a Great Thread with Video on how to light the AMNPS with the use of a heat gun:

Link:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/140859/how-i-light-my-amnps-w-video-link

 

 

Bear

post #223 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
<snip>

Also: There already is a Great Thread with Video on how to light the AMNPS with the use of a heat gun:

Link:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/140859/how-i-light-my-amnps-w-video-link

 

 

Bear

Bear,

 

Thanks for that link. I actually viewed that video in my search for better methods of lighting the AMPNPS. I tried it, but it didn't quite work. However, using the heat gun got me to thinking: why do I even need a torch? I bought my heat gun for heat shrink tubing, but on the high setting, it gets hot enough to burn paint off siding. In fact, you can buy heat guns for this purpose. So, why not eliminate the torch and simply use the heat gun for the ignition? In addition to using it for ignition, I first do a pre-heat -- from the top, bottom, and sides -- of the entire length of chips. This provides an even better pre-heat than the somewhat dicey (IMHO) microwave preheat that some people recommend.

 

As with the more traditional torch method, there is still some art in not blowing too hard and getting the chips so red that they get a coating that slows down the smoldering. The objective, I think, is to get a big chunk burning, with a flame, and then let that flame burn for at least 2-3 minutes. Since a bigger chunk gets ignited (compared to first using a torch), and since a big chunk is heated to the point of almost burning, but not actually burning, when you finally get a flame, that flame gets them to that equivalent of what you want with charcoal, namely the entire briquet gray and slightly glowing.

 

But, like I said, I need to do a complete post about this, with video.

 

Thanks again for this now-classic salmon thread. I read it after I did my last salmon a few days ago, but am planning to follow your directions, especially the times and temperatures, the next time I smoke salmon in a few weeks.

post #224 of 237
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
 

Bear,

 

Thanks for that link. I actually viewed that video in my search for better methods of lighting the AMPNPS. I tried it, but it didn't quite work. However, using the heat gun got me to thinking: why do I even need a torch? I bought my heat gun for heat shrink tubing, but on the high setting, it gets hot enough to burn paint off siding. In fact, you can buy heat guns for this purpose. So, why not eliminate the torch and simply use the heat gun for the ignition? In addition to using it for ignition, I first do a pre-heat -- from the top, bottom, and sides -- of the entire length of chips. This provides an even better pre-heat than the somewhat dicey (IMHO) microwave preheat that some people recommend.

 

As with the more traditional torch method, there is still some art in not blowing too hard and getting the chips so red that they get a coating that slows down the smoldering. The objective, I think, is to get a big chunk burning, with a flame, and then let that flame burn for at least 2-3 minutes. Since a bigger chunk gets ignited (compared to first using a torch), and since a big chunk is heated to the point of almost burning, but not actually burning, when you finally get a flame, that flame gets them to that equivalent of what you want with charcoal, namely the entire briquet gray and slightly glowing.

 

But, like I said, I need to do a complete post about this, with video.

 

Thanks again for this now-classic salmon thread. I read it after I did my last salmon a few days ago, but am planning to follow your directions, especially the times and temperatures, the next time I smoke salmon in a few weeks.


Now that's really interesting!!

When you get that thread/video posted, please don't let me miss it---PM me if you have to, so I don't miss it.

I never even tried chips or chunks in an AMNPS----Only use Pellets in mine.

 

And Thank You for the comments on my Smoked Salmon!!

 

Bear

post #225 of 237
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Workedtheworld View Post

Bear, another take on putting the fat in a pan with holes over the meat is this. Put some ABT's (i.e.atomic buffalo turds aka jalapeno-cheese stuffed poppers wrapped in bacon) on a rack over the meat and let the dripping bacon fat baste as well. You can eat the poppers afterward and the ham is well basted.


Thank You!!

That would work, but you'd have to have about 50 ABTs in a 10" X 10" area to equal the amount of basting you can get with a big old pan of pure Pork Fat.

 

 

Bear

post #226 of 237

You are right about perhaps 50 ABT's.  Around here, the 50 would go pretty quick though.  They would take a lot longer to make up though.

post #227 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 


Now that's really interesting!!

When you get that thread/video posted, please don't let me miss it---PM me if you have to, so I don't miss it.

I never even tried chips or chunks in an AMNPS----Only use Pellets in mine.

 

And Thank You for the comments on my Smoked Salmon!!

 

Bear

I must have screwed up on how I worded my post. I am just using pellets at the moment, and all I was describing was a different way to light those.

 

However, you must be reading my mind because I want to try to use some "chips" I have which are actually part sawdust. They are a Smokehouse brand that I can get at an Ace Hardware less than a mile from where I live. I also plan to buy some sawdust from Todd and see how that works. I like his pellets, and I think they are pure wood (unlike the Trager pellets), but something in me keeps saying that I would have better taste if I could use wood that is an unprocessed as possible.

 

For anyone reading this post, I did try to reduce the small chips into sawdust so that I would be left with nothing but sawdust. I used my 38-year-old wedding gift Cuisinart (CFP-9). I used an old blade that I retired decades ago because it has a chip in the leading edge. I ran the chips for about a minute when suddenly all heck broke loose. I stopped the machine, and found that the inside of the blade drive had completely self destructed. Not only that, the friction from the dry chips rubbing against the bowl had partially melted the plastic.

 

The good news is that the wife was understanding, and the machine still works, after I scraped off all the melted plastic and ran some stale walnuts through it, using the good blade, to help season the plastic. I'm currently searching eBay for a replacement.

 

So, based on my experience, I would definitely recommend to NOT use your blender or food processor to try to reduce chips to sawdust. They are, after all, hardwood, and are definitely too tough to be pulverized by nothing more than spinning blades. I'm still thinking of other tools or methods that might create sawdust without contaminating the result (like a chainsaw would, because of the chain oil).

post #228 of 237
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
 

I must have screwed up on how I worded my post. I am just using pellets at the moment, and all I was describing was a different way to light those.

 

However, you must be reading my mind because I want to try to use some "chips" I have which are actually part sawdust. They are a Smokehouse brand that I can get at an Ace Hardware less than a mile from where I live. I also plan to buy some sawdust from Todd and see how that works. I like his pellets, and I think they are pure wood (unlike the Trager pellets), but something in me keeps saying that I would have better taste if I could use wood that is an unprocessed as possible.

 

For anyone reading this post, I did try to reduce the small chips into sawdust so that I would be left with nothing but sawdust. I used my 38-year-old wedding gift Cuisinart (CFP-9). I used an old blade that I retired decades ago because it has a chip in the leading edge. I ran the chips for about a minute when suddenly all heck broke loose. I stopped the machine, and found that the inside of the blade drive had completely self destructed. Not only that, the friction from the dry chips rubbing against the bowl had partially melted the plastic.

 

The good news is that the wife was understanding, and the machine still works, after I scraped off all the melted plastic and ran some stale walnuts through it, using the good blade, to help season the plastic. I'm currently searching eBay for a replacement.

 

So, based on my experience, I would definitely recommend to NOT use your blender or food processor to try to reduce chips to sawdust. They are, after all, hardwood, and are definitely too tough to be pulverized by nothing more than spinning blades. I'm still thinking of other tools or methods that might create sawdust without contaminating the result (like a chainsaw would, because of the chain oil).


Dust works Great, but I use it in my AMNS, and use my AMNPS for only pellets. However you can use Dust in the AMNPS.

 

As for Chainsaw dust----I've done a lot of Chainsawing, and if you want to use it for smoking, just drain the bar oil from your Chainsaw, and replace it with cooking oil. Then you'll be safe.

 

Bear

post #229 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 


Dust works Great, but I use it in my AMNS, and use my AMNPS for only pellets. However you can use Dust in the AMNPS.

 

As for Chainsaw dust----I've done a lot of Chainsawing, and if you want to use it for smoking, just drain the bar oil from your Chainsaw, and replace it with cooking oil. Then you'll be safe.

 

Bear


Cooking oil in my chainsaw??? I have some garlic-infused olive oil I've been trying to get rid of for years. I love the idea of feeding it to my chain saw.

 

Business idea: we could start a business selling specialty oils to chain saw owners. "make your chain saw smell like a fine French restaurant."

 

Does it work for gun oil as well?

post #230 of 237
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
 


Cooking oil in my chainsaw??? I have some garlic-infused olive oil I've been trying to get rid of for years. I love the idea of feeding it to my chain saw.

 

Business idea: we could start a business selling specialty oils to chain saw owners. "make your chain saw smell like a fine French restaurant."

 

Does it work for gun oil as well?


LOL------I might use it on my old 7MM Mauser, but I wouldn't try it on my Model 88 Win' (.308).

 

Some Buddies of mine did some chainsawing on Gov property, and they had to use cooking oil.

 

That's how I knew about it. Below is more on Chainsawing:

 

Why They Call Me "Bearcarver":   
Link:
 
 
Bear
post #231 of 237

Bear,

 

I'd heard some reference to your carving, but had not seen that post. Absolutely amazing, at every level. I don't have the talent for any of it, but even if I did, I wouldn't have the patience for all those "hair cuts" (pun intended). Loved the family of bears, and the picture of the real deal sampling some of your handiwork.

 

John

post #232 of 237
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
 

Bear,

 

I'd heard some reference to your carving, but had not seen that post. Absolutely amazing, at every level. I don't have the talent for any of it, but even if I did, I wouldn't have the patience for all those "hair cuts" (pun intended). Loved the family of bears, and the picture of the real deal sampling some of your handiwork.

 

John


Thank You for the compliments, John!!

 

It's funny you mentioned the "Hair Cuts". That takes so long doing all those little cuts (Death by a thousand cuts--LOL), and I liked to do it at about half throttle.

However my chainsaw would keep creeping up faster & faster while make all those little strokes.

I had to drill & insert a screw in the trigger, to stop the RPM creep. 

You wouldn't believe how much easier that made the whole process of putting on the hair.

 

Thanks again,

Bear

post #233 of 237

This is about the 4th or 5th time I've done the double smoked ham - more or less by your method and I felt I needed to add my props to all the others here.  Been well received every time and really one of the easier things to do on a holiday.  (My other holidays are spoken for: Thanksgiving - smoked turkey, Christmas - prime rib, Memorial Day, July 4th and Labor Day - Ribs.)

 

I follow your methodology except I use Chris Lilly's Spiced Apricot Sauce.

 

Well done Bear! 

post #234 of 237
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tycho bray View Post
 

This is about the 4th or 5th time I've done the double smoked ham - more or less by your method and I felt I needed to add my props to all the others here.  Been well received every time and really one of the easier things to do on a holiday.  (My other holidays are spoken for: Thanksgiving - smoked turkey, Christmas - prime rib, Memorial Day, July 4th and Labor Day - Ribs.)

 

I follow your methodology except I use Chris Lilly's Spiced Apricot Sauce.

 

Well done Bear! 


That's Great Tycho!!!

 

I'm glad you like it----I love "Easy".  If it's not easy, I don't usually do it.

 

Thank You,

Bear

post #235 of 237

Bear, I like the way you think!

post #236 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 

 

Thanks Pops!!!

 

I have always loved Double Smoked Ham, but for some reason mine are tastier than the ones I used to buy. LOL--And a whole lot cheaper!!!

 

 

Bear


Long ago before I read this forum, I would beg any family members to give me there spiral spliced ham and let me smoke it. Smoke gets in between them splices damn pretty darn good. Add nothing. NOW..... Did ham and putting fat above, MMMMMMMMM! Thanks Bear for this one. Fat dripped on down like water.:biggrin:

post #237 of 237
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilgeslime View Post
 

Bear, I like the way you think!

:biggrin:----Thumbs Up

 

Thanks!!

 

Bear

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dave17a View Post
 


Long ago before I read this forum, I would beg any family members to give me there spiral spliced ham and let me smoke it. Smoke gets in between them splices damn pretty darn good. Add nothing. NOW..... Did ham and putting fat above, MMMMMMMMM! Thanks Bear for this one. Fat dripped on down like water.:biggrin:

 

Thank You Dave!!

 

I love the way that works!!

 

Bear

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