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Reverse sear Prime Rib question.

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I was able to grab a 7 pounded bone in Prime Rib at $5.99/ pound at Acme today. I'm going to smoke it on Saturday and wanted to reverse sear it. For those who have done this, how many degrees will the IT jump during the sear?
post #2 of 13

IMHO you will be better served by cooking at 325° to the IT that you want for doneness, some cuts derive no benefit from being slow cooked.

And "reverse sear" has no advantages that searing first does not.

post #3 of 13

Cliff i know you're not a fan of the reverse sear...maybe try it with different thickness of meat and or different cookers.  I find you can get the most tender and evenly cooked inside ever. 

 

W/ regards as to what IT to cook to for reverse sear it really depends on the thickness and how done you like your meat.

post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigboy View Post

I was able to grab a 7 pounded bone in Prime Rib at $5.99/ pound at Acme today. I'm going to smoke it on Saturday and wanted to reverse sear it. For those who have done this, how many degrees will the IT jump during the sear?

Depends on how hot of a fire you're searing over and how long you sear. We like our steaks rare so I use a super hot fire and sear each side just enough to get good grill marks. I am assuming you'll slice the roast prior to searing. If I am doing it that way I take the roast to an IT of 125*. If I was not going to sear it then I take it to an IT of 135*, rest, slice and serve.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

Depends on how hot of a fire you're searing over and how long you sear. We like our steaks rare so I use a super hot fire and sear each side just enough to get good grill marks. I am assuming you'll slice the roast prior to searing. If I am doing it that way I take the roast to an IT of 125*. If I was not going to sear it then I take it to an IT of 135*, rest, slice and serve.

I was NOT going to slice before searing actually. The "plan" (bear with me this is my first Rib) was to cook to an IT of like 120. Then pull and put on the grill to let the fire hit it on all side for roughly 60-90 seconds per side to give the rib a nice crust before resting and slicing. My wife and kids like their steaks more medium and I'm willing to concede to this on the first cook if need be. If the Rib came out medium rare, I would just put theirs on the already lit grill to finish.

I was just looking ROUGHLY how much I can expect the IT to jump during that sear. I'm hoping to slice this at like 137 IT.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffcarter View Post

IMHO you will be better served by cooking at 325° to the IT that you want for doneness, some cuts derive no benefit from being slow cooked.
And "reverse sear" has no advantages that searing first does not.

The main reason for the reverse sear approach was that if the meat wasn't done to my families liking I could just put their steak over the already lit coals.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigboy View Post


I was NOT going to slice before searing actually. The "plan" (bear with me this is my first Rib) was to cook to an IT of like 120. Then pull and put on the grill to let the fire hit it on all side for roughly 60-90 seconds per side to give the rib a nice crust before resting and slicing. My wife and kids like their steaks more medium and I'm willing to concede to this on the first cook if need be. If the Rib came out medium rare, I would just put theirs on the already lit grill to finish.

I was just looking ROUGHLY how much I can expect the IT to jump during that sear. I'm hoping to slice this at like 137 IT.

In this scenario you really need to slice the roast then sear. Just searing the roast itself is going to heat the whole thing up and it will have a uniform doneness. Typically if I have requests for prime rib to be more done than I cook it to, I will grill the slices.

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

In this scenario you really need to slice the roast then sear. Just searing the roast itself is going to heat the whole thing up and it will have a uniform doneness. Typically if I have requests for prime rib to be more done than I cook it to, I will grill the slices.

I was wanted to get a nice burnt crust on the outside of the whole roast, if possible.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigboy View Post


I was wanted to get a nice burnt crust on the outside of the whole roast, if possible.

Then yes searing it at the end would achieve that. What kind of smoker are you using? If you can get right on the coals that should work. I would pull the roast at 120*-125*. Then sear right on the coals.  I did that the other day on dome chops and it doesn't take very long to get the char.

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/141454/reverse-seared-pork-n-korn

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

Then yes searing it at the end would achieve that. What kind of smoker are you using? If you can get right on the coals that should work. I would pull the roast at 120*-125*. Then sear right on the coals.  I did that the other day on dome chops and it doesn't take very long to get the char.

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/141454/reverse-seared-pork-n-korn

I have a WSM and I may have something on the lower grate so it could be a PITA
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigboy View Post




I have a WSM and I may have something on the lower grate so it could be a PITA

Well you could certainly throw under the broiler in the oven to get the crust on it. The last prime rib I did, I ran the smoker at 265*-275* and it had a pretty good bark on it, but not like if it had been seared or run under the broiler. Before I built my mini-wsm I used to use my gas bbq to sear whatever I smoked in my gas smoker and that worked good too.

post #12 of 13

I do mine all with a smoker temp between 220 and 240, and I get a little real nice bark. Not heavy & hard---just right. IMO

However the big reward I get from those temps is the Med-Rare Pink color throughout the whole roast, from bark to bark.

Temps above 260 or so give you Medium or more on the outer inch or more of the roast, and pink only in the middle.

 

Check the temps & times here:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/110433/prime-rib-new-best-ever

 

And ALL 6 of these were done that same way:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/138992/prime-rib-calendar-my-favorite-smokes

 

Bear

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the help guys, I'll post my q-view later on tonight!
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