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beef clods

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

As I am pretty new at the smoking process here, I have a quick question in which I hope someone can answer me here,  I have a chance at getting some beef clods and would like to know some ways to smoke them. Can I make dried beef out of them, jerky, brisket???? any and all answers are greatly appreciated. 

post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julliette View Post

As I am pretty new at the smoking process here, I have a quick question in which I hope someone can answer me here,  I have a chance at getting some beef clods and would like to know some ways to smoke them. Can I make dried beef out of them, jerky, brisket???? any and all answers are greatly appreciated. 

 

I would suggest making it like a Brisket---Low & slow.

 

Probably too much fat for Dried Beef or Jerky.

 

Others may know more about it.

 

 

Bear

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

thanks bear, I have not seen what the beef clods look like, but I have bought some pork clods in the past for making sausage and found out that there was very little fat on the pork clods, way to lean for sausage.

post #4 of 13

Beef Clod is a portion of the Chuck or Shoulder. It is great low and slow for Pulled Beef or Pot Roast but the mix of muscles and fat content will not make good Jerky unless you grind it and use some thing to extrude sticks or ribbons for ground jerky...JJ

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julliette View Post

thanks bear, I have not seen what the beef clods look like, but I have bought some pork clods in the past for making sausage and found out that there was very little fat on the pork clods, way to lean for sausage.

 

Yes, Beef Clods probably vary in how lean they are, but for Dried Beef, you want no fat at all. Eye rounds are the best for home made dried beef. Only a small amount of fat cap to be trimmed off, and NO internal fat.

 

 

Bear

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks JJ, I do have a jerky gun so could do that, sounds like this is a 15#  lean clod beef, at $2.25 a pound. might have to purchase some and see what i can do with it.

 

 

what do you suggest or dried beef?? eye of round? or is there something else that would work that is  not quite so pricey?

 

Thanks for the help  Jullie

post #7 of 13

It really don't get cheaper than Eye Round or Top Round. Check out this thread from Bearcarver...JJ

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/93718/smoked-dried-beef-with-lots-of-qview

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

another question for you....I did purchase about 13 # of beef clod..trimed it up, took out all silver skin and an any tissue, course ground it up, was very very lean, hardly any fat, plan to make jerky and sticks, I fried up a patty ( had to use some oil to fry it) to see what it was like and found out it is very dry, now the question...is this going to be to lean for jerky and sticks?

 

Than you   JJ

post #9 of 13

You want it lean for jerky and sticks. It is fat that goes rancid and gets a fishy taste. You should be fine using the lean meat...JJ

post #10 of 13

I believe most of us prefer 80/20 for sausage & sticks----You can add a little pork fat.

 

Leave it lean for the Jerky.

 

 

Bear

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

looks like I'll be doing some ground beef jerky this weekend, thanks for the advise

post #12 of 13

Beef Shoulder Clod:

 

 

is quite a versatile sub-primal.  The shoulder arm section:

 

 

 has the bones (long ribs) removed and fat peeled off, then the shoulder arm boneless roast:

 

 

 

is the best part of the shoulder clod.  The exterior muscle groups are removed, can be used for stew beef, cube steak, or ground.  However, the arm roast is lean and moderately tender and is great for London Broil; or trimmed out for dried beef or jerky.

 

From Beef Innovations Group: Processing the Shoulder Clod:

 

http://www.beefinnovationsgroup.com/Valuecuts/shoulderclod/

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks POPs... what I got was 5"- 6 " long stripes of pure meat approx 2-21/2 " thick, very little fat...some silver skin,  after trimming off what little fat and silver skin there was off, I lost less than a 1/2 # meat. there was no fat in meat, no marbling, just pure red meat, I thought it would work for dried beef, but being very new at this wasn't sure if it would be to tough, so  I ground up all of it, used some for ground jerky, may use some of it for chili, not sure yet,  I have a little meat shop near me that I can get pig belly, pork clods( also little fat or silver skin) beef clods and many exotic meats, fish, poultry, you name it they have or can probably get for you LOL...JJ

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