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Book on making vinegar

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Anyone have a suggestion for the purchase of a good book on vinegar making. Also, any supply houses you might recommend?     Paul

post #2 of 4

Here is some info...JJ

 

http://store.homebrew4less.com/Mother-Of-Vinegar/products/871/

 

 

Item # Image Description Price
BWCVC Mother Of Vinegar --- Cider - 8 oz Jar
Mother Of Vinegar --- Cider - 8 oz Jar

Mother Of Vinegar --- Cider - 8 oz jar

Use this culture to make your own vinegar.

In a One gallon jar add this culture and 24 oz of hard cider. Plug opening lightly with cotton or a cloth and in 3 months you will have vinegar.

Cider vinegar culture-8 oz jar to make 1 quart finished product, which can then be used to make increased volume by building up, much like a sourdough starter. These mother of vinegar starter cultures were featured in Food & Wine magazine's October 2006 issue.

The quality of your water also makes a difference in how your vinegar will taste, and chemicals in city water can impact your success. So if you like the taste of your tap water, let it set in an open jar or pitcher for 24 hours before using to allow at least the chlorine to evaporate. Also consider bottled or distilled water.

Vinegar mother likes to be kept warm. It probably won't die if it's too cold (we've frozen it with success), but it certainly won't turn the wine into vinegar, either, and you take the chance of mold growing before it can convert. So WARM is better.

For small batches (1 to 2 gallons) we recommed on top of your refrigerator towards the back. Pantry, closet shelf, and kitchen counter are also good choices.


What's that Slimy Stuff?!?

Yes, that slimy stuff is the "Mother" of vinegar. It's not always slimy; once the mother has had a chance to work for several months, it should get thick and feel more like wet leather.

Mother of vinegar is a substance composed of a form of cellulose and acetic acid bacteria that develops on fermenting alcoholic liquids, which turns alcohol into acetic acid with the help of oxygen from the air. It is added to wine, cider, or other alcoholic liquids to produce vinegar.

The Most Important Thing
Be patient and give your vinegar a chance to fully convert and mellow its flavors.

Do NOT use aluminum, cast iron, or enamaled container or spoons in or around your vinegar starter culture, or completed vinegar.

It will eat through the materials, and in some cases (aluminum!) can cause a toxic gas and/or introduce toxins to your vinegar.

In Stock
 
 
 
 
$12.47 

BWRWVC Mother Of Vinegar --- Red Wine - 8 oz Jar
Mother Of Vinegar --- Red Wine - 8 oz Jar

Mother Of Vinegar --- Red Wine - 8 oz jar

Use this culture to make your own Red Wine vinegar.

In a One gallon jar add this culture and 16 oz of Red Wine and 8 oz of water. Plug opening lightly with cotton or a cloth and in 3 months you will have vinegar.

Red Wine vinegar culture-8 oz jar to makes 1 quart of finished product, which can then be used to make increased volume by building up, much like a sourdough starter. These mother of vinegar starter cultures were featured in Food & Wine magazine's October 2006 issue.

The quality of your water also makes a difference in how your vinegar will taste, and chemicals in city water can impact your success. So if you like the taste of your tap water, let it set in an open jar or pitcher for 24 hours before using to allow at least the chlorine to evaporate. Also consider bottled or distilled water.

Vinegar mother likes to be kept warm. It probably won't die if it's too cold (we've frozen it with success), but it certainly won't turn the wine into vinegar, either, and you take the chance of mold growing before it can convert. So WARM is better.

For small batches (1 to 2 gallons) we recommed on top of your refrigerator towards the back. Pantry, closet shelf, and kitchen counter are also good choices.


What's that Slimy Stuff?!?

Yes, that slimy stuff is the "Mother" of vinegar. It's not always slimy; once the mother has had a chance to work for several months, it should get thick and feel more like wet leather.

Mother of vinegar is a substance composed of a form of cellulose and acetic acid bacteria that develops on fermenting alcoholic liquids, which turns alcohol into acetic acid with the help of oxygen from the air. It is added to wine, cider, or other alcoholic liquids to produce vinegar.

The Most Important Thing
Be patient and give your vinegar a chance to fully convert and mellow its flavors.

Do NOT use aluminum, cast iron, or enamaled container or spoons in or around your vinegar starter culture, or completed vinegar.

It will eat through the materials, and in some cases (aluminum!) can cause a toxic gas and/or introduce toxins to your vinegar.

Red Wine Vinegar Culture-8 oz jar to make one quart of finished product, which can be used to build up to larger volumes later. This is the "mother of vinegar" starter culture featured in Food & Wine magazine's October 2006 issue. This  mother culture has been continuously producing for over 25 years.

Check for Availability
 
 
 
 
$12.47 

BWWWVC Mother Of Vinegar --- White Wine - 8 oz Jar
Mother Of Vinegar --- White Wine - 8 oz Jar

Mother Of Vinegar --- White Wine - 8 oz jar

Use this culture to make your own White Wine vinegar.

In a One gallon jar add this culture and 16 oz of White Wine and 8 oz of water. Plug opening lightly with cotton or a cloth and in 3 months you will have vinegar.

White Wine vinegar culture-8 oz jar to makes 1 quart of finished product, which can then be used to make increased volume by building up, much like a sourdough starter. These mother of vinegar starter cultures were featured in Food & Wine magazine's October 2006 issue.

The quality of your water also makes a difference in how your vinegar will taste, and chemicals in city water can impact your success. So if you like the taste of your tap water, let it set in an open jar or pitcher for 24 hours before using to allow at least the chlorine to evaporate. Also consider bottled or distilled water.

Vinegar mother likes to be kept warm. It probably won't die if it's too cold (we've frozen it with success), but it certainly won't turn the wine into vinegar, either, and you take the chance of mold growing before it can convert. So WARM is better.

For small batches (1 to 2 gallons) we recommed on top of your refrigerator towards the back. Pantry, closet shelf, and kitchen counter are also good choices.


What's that Slimy Stuff?!?

Yes, that slimy stuff is the "Mother" of vinegar. It's not always slimy; once the mother has had a chance to work for several months, it should get thick and feel more like wet leather.

Mother of vinegar is a substance composed of a form of cellulose and acetic acid bacteria that develops on fermenting alcoholic liquids, which turns alcohol into acetic acid with the help of oxygen from the air. It is added to wine, cider, or other alcoholic liquids to produce vinegar.

The Most Important Thing
Be patient and give your vinegar a chance to fully convert and mellow its flavors.

Do NOT use aluminum, cast iron, or enamaled container or spoons in or around your vinegar starter culture, or completed vinegar.

It will eat through the materials, and in some cases (aluminum!) can cause a toxic gas and/or introduce toxins to your vinegar.

White Wine Vinegar Culture-8 oz jar to make one quart of finished product, which can be used to build up to larger volumes later. This is the "mother of vinegar" starter culture featured in Food & Wine magazine's October 2006 issue. This  mother culture has been continuously producing for over 25 years.

In Stock
 
 
 
 
$12.47 

BC396-1 Book, Making Vinegar At Home (Romanowski)
Book, Making Vinegar At Home (Romanowski)
Making Vinegar at Home instructional book by Frank Romanowski, was the first book to deal with vinegar making and is still the best. Also contains recipes and a wealth of information. 50 pages, softcover. This booklet was featured in Food & Wine magazine
In Stock
 
 
 
 
$7.26 

BC398-1 Book, Gourmet Vinegars (Johnson)
Book, Gourmet Vinegars (Johnson)
Gourmet Vinegars: The How-Tos of Making & Cooking With Vinegars [Book] By Marsha Peters Johnson - Sibyl Publications (2002) - Paperback - 83 pages - ISBN 1889531057 Make your own gourmet vinegars with the simple, clearly explained recipes in this book. The 57 economical, giftable, incredibly delicious berry, fruit, flower, herb, spice, and vegetable vinegars include: Sweet Basil with Blueberry, Chives and Chilies, Tarragon, Mixed Herbs, Strawberry with Spices, and Lime Vinegar. Enjoy outstanding recipes such as: Oregon Blueberry Chicken, Shallot Marinade, Papaya Chutney, Garlic Festival Gazpacho, and Raspberry Cooler.
Check for Availability
 
 
 
 
$7.78 

BC381-1 Book, Homemade Vinegar (Watkins)
Book, Homemade Vinegar (Watkins)
Homemade Vinegar by Patrick and Carole Watkins Making your own vinegar with mother of vinegar is a great do it yourself projet.Turning wine into vinegar is very interesting and educational. You can make homemade vinegar with your own homemade wine, or a vast number of commercial wines. Homemade vinegars make excellent gifts for family and friends, especially when you add herbs and or vegetables to your vinegar. This book shows you how!
In Stock
 
 
 
 
$9.30 

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 

Thanks Jimmy. I was going to order their book "  Making Vinegar At Home (Romanowski) " but they wanted almost 13 dollars shipping on it!! Paul
 

post #4 of 4

I would think if you look around you will get a better price. I just posted that info because it was fairly complete. I made Champagne Vinegar about 12 years ago when I first started teaching. It is pretty much mix the Mother in the Wine and let it do it's thing...JJ

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