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seasoned or fresh cut wood - Page 2

post #21 of 30

No slap down intended...lol

 

Myron don't don't do anything the normal way as near as I can tell.

post #22 of 30

I find it hard to believe, running at 375 for the entire cook.........It just don't add up to me. And I'm not one of those ultra low heat cooks either, 275-300* is usually where you will see my smokers running, higher on chicken, and when finishing the ribs.....but doing a Butt at 375, its hard to imagine it having much of a smoke ring, and not getting too crispy on the outside.anything much more than 300* starts to create a barrier crust that will not allow any more smoke penetration.......

post #23 of 30

I thought the same - he also wants 3-4 hours FTC after so in a comp he has limited time.

 

If I could post a link there are several places he discusses this online

post #24 of 30

has anyone tasted the food?

post #25 of 30

thats the big question, no?

post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ribwizzard View Post

I find it hard to believe, running at 375 for the entire cook.........It just don't add up to me. And I'm not one of those ultra low heat cooks either, 275-300* is usually where you will see my smokers running, higher on chicken, and when finishing the ribs.....but doing a Butt at 375, its hard to imagine it having much of a smoke ring, and not getting too crispy on the outside.anything much more than 300* starts to create a barrier crust that will not allow any more smoke penetration.......

Whether the meat does or does not have a smoke ring is not part of the judging criteria in BBQ comps.

I do not know where you came up with your statement on a crust forming at high temps that does not allow smoke penetration, I always get plenty of smoke flavor on my turkey burgers and they are liberally coated with rub and seared over very hot lump and grilled indirect at 450°-500° and the maple I use for smoke flavor always does its job.

Myron Mixon's butts do not get too crispy because his smokers have a large capacity water pan, the steam creates a moist environment.

If you have a Netflix account I believe they still have the first season of BBQ Pitmasters on there, you can watch it for yourself, Episode 1 I believe.


Edited by cliffcarter - 7/20/13 at 7:18am
post #27 of 30
I use seasoned wood. When trimming the peach and plum trees I put them under a cedar tree for a year before I start using them.

BTW: You can buy a cooker from Myron. You take a class on how to use it when you get it.
post #28 of 30
Quote:

Whether the meat does or does not have a smoke ring is not part of the judging criteria in BBQ comps.

I do not know where you came up with your statement on a crust forming at high temps that does not allow smoke penetration, I always get plenty of smoke flavor on my turkey burgers and they are liberally coated with rub and seared over very hot lump and grilled indirect at 450°-500° and the maple I use for smoke flavor always does its job.

Myron Mixon's butts do not get too crispy because his smokers have a large capacity water pan, the steam creates a moist environment.

If you have a Netflix account I believe they still have the first season of BBQ Pitmasters on there, you can watch it for yourself, Episode 1 believe

I think its a regional thing, before joining this forum I was limited in my exposure to the BBQ culture with what I grew up with, and what we here judge as the quality of true Q.  What we may turn our nose's up at , others may consider to be the "bomb". The same is true with just about all cuisine, right? Whats true pizza, Ny or Chicago? BBQ is even more regional, Texas style, Memphis style, Carolina style, and on and on.

 

Its just that , if what y'all are telling me about his cooking methods is accurate, it would be impossible for him to produce, what we here would consider award winning BBQ. But my buddy from N.Y. might go crazy about it. 

 

And I know that I've fallen short on here when it comes to posting pics of food, its just the camera is the last thing your worried about when you have a mob of hungry friends ready to eat, but I promise when my current build is done , I'm going to stop building for a while and start doing some cooking so I can start representing "Tampa style Q" on here. OK?

post #29 of 30

I just got a Char-Broil vertical yesterday and plan on seasoning it and using it within the next week.

 

Does soaking the wood (in water or apple juice, etc) for any period of time prior to your cook have any effect? And if I'm understanding some of ya'll you're suggesting NOT to use water in the water pan???

 

Any tips, suggestions, etc would be greatly appreciated

 

Thanks in advance

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackout View Post

 

 

...Does soaking the wood (in water or apple juice, etc) for any period of time prior to your cook have any effect...

 

 

Keep your wood dry.

Soaking wood will have an effect if you soak it long enough to change its internal moisture content, this means soaking dry, seasoned wood for at least 4 days in order to raise the internal moisture content any significant amount. I personally see no sense to soaking wood for a long slow cook- temps from 225° to 300°+, the chunks take too long to start smoking because of the increased water content and if they are sitting in or on charcoal briquettes the moisture may actually keep the briquettes from burning efficiently. Soaking wood chunks does make a bit of sense if you are grilling over a hot charcoal fire, the water soaked wood will smoke for a longer time than dry wood, but in the end it is not worth soaking for 4 days IMHO.

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