SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Making Jerky › Please help with measuring Cure # 1 for Jerky
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Please help with measuring Cure # 1 for Jerky - Page 2

post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by kryinggame View Post

Morning all,

Dave I apologize if I wasn't clear.
When I said wet solution in my original posting, I meant a combination of sauces (teriyaki , soy sauce, etc.) . Normally, use use a dry Solution, such as made by hi country.  What is a "dry solution"   Dave

I hope this clarifies my question. Thank you for your insight.

kg, morning.... Sorry again.... The same goes for any liquid in a brine/cure.....  weigh the liquid and the meat...   add the cure in the correct amount according to the total weight....  Ppm, when curing, is based on weight/weight.... Pounds of cure to add to pounds of what ever you are putting the cure in....  or grams.... or ounces.... etc....  Dave  

post #22 of 38

i don't understand the use of #1 since the whole idea behind making jerky was to cure/preserve meat long before the days of frigidaire, #1 and tender quick.

tony

post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ac45acp View Post

i don't understand the use of #1 since the whole idea behind making jerky was to cure/preserve meat long before the days of frigidaire, #1 and tender quick.
tony

In those days they didn't understand the danger of botulism when smoking at low temperature.


~Martin
post #24 of 38
Thread Starter 

All, here's a conversation that SmokinHusker and I had. Not taking anything away from the advice given by others here, I found her explanation a bit simpler to grasp. 


I really appreciate the detailed information that everyone passed on. I told her that my biggest fear is the ton of useless information that's often passed on the internet and regretably, by some on this site.  I'm grateful to those who take the time (over and over again) to educate those who are less knowledable. 

 

This is the chart I have for Cure #1 for Dry Curing, NOT Wet Curing whole muscle meats and based on 1/4" or thinner strips of meat.

NOT SAUSAGE as that is a different.

For the 2.65 lbs Duck, I used 3 grams of Cure #1 and for the 4.06 lbs of Goose, I used 4.6 grams of Cure #1

 

Meat for Dry Curing

Cure #1 in ounces

Cure #1 in grams

Cure #1 in teaspoons

25 lbs.

4

113.4

20

5 lbs.

0.8

22.64

4

1 lb.

0.16

4.4

3/4

1 kg

0.35

10.0

1.5

 

The reason that there are much higher allowable nitrite limits for dry cured products is that nitrite dissipates rapidly in time and the dry cured products are air dried for a long time. Those higher limits guarantee a steady supply of nitrite.

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/118474/ryteks-recipe-and-cure-1#post_779117

 

You can use DiggingDogFarm's Universal Calculator http://diggingdogfarm.com/page2.html to figure it as well. Use a 1:1 ration of liquid/marinade to meat - thus 1 lb of marinade to 1 pound of meat and for this you would need 3/8 tsp Cure #1. If you are doing 2 lbs of meat, then you would need 2 lbs of marinade and in that case multiply 3/8 tsp x 4 lbs = 1.5 tsp of Cure #1. Using DDF's universal calculator, you would need 4.53 grams of Cure #, using 907.18 gr meat + 907.18 gr marinade = 1814.36 gr total weight (this is the number you would put into the calculator for the weight of the meat. 

 

You said you are using 2 lbs of meat, which weighs 907.18 gr, and you said you are using Teriyaki, Garlic and Pineapple. Is this pineapple juice? If so, you are going to have to weigh the teriyaki and the pineapple juice and that needs to equal 2 lbs or 907.18 gr

Add the two (meat (907.18 gr) and marinade (907.18 gr)) together (1814.36 gr), put this amount in the calculator for the weight of the meat and you get 4.53 gr Cure #1. 

I wouldn't add much if any salt and sugar to your marinade as teriyaki has both salt and sugar in it and pineapple juice will probably have sugar in it. You can always mix up your marinade (without the Cure #1) and taste it for saltiness or sweetness and adjust the amount of salt and/or sugar you add.

 

Here's a couple Teriyaki Jerky recipe that NEPAS posted on the forum. It's for 5 lbs and looks like he doesn't weigh his liquids but relies on the chart above: 1 tsp Cure #1 to 5 lbs of whole muscle meat.

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/108676/looking-for-good-teriyaki-jerky-recipe

 

post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by kryinggame View Post

hV0j5.png




Just a heads-up!

156ppm nitrite is the most that should be used with jerky, same as sausage.
Higher levels of nitrite or nitrate are for true dry curing for extended periods of time, things like country ham, proscuitto, etc.

The nitrite level in that chart is very high, 624ppm nitrite !!!! icon_eek.gif

~Martin
post #26 of 38

You are absolutely correct Martin. I sent him the wrong chart, the one I mistakenly sent him was for dry curing whole pieces of meat, not jerky and I take full responsibility for the mistake. I sent him a PM with the corrected one and I'll post it here as well. I find your calculator easier to use and thank you for taking the time to create it and share it with us.

 

 

How to Apply Cures

Well, there are two approaches:

  • Like an amateur - collecting hundreds of recipes and relying blindly on each of them. You lose a recipe and you don’t know what to do. And how do you know they contain the right amount of cure?
  • Like a professional - taking matters in your own hands and applying cures according to the USA Government requirements.

In case you want to be the professional, we are enclosing some useful data which is based on the U.S. standards. Comminuted products - small meat pieces, meat for sausages, ground meat, poultry etc. Cure #1 was developed in such a way that if we add 4 ounces of Cure #1 to 100 pounds of meat, the quantity of nitrite added to meat will conform to the legal limits (156 ppm) permitted by the Meat Division of the United States Department of Agriculture.

That corresponds to 1 oz. (28.35 g) of Cure #1 for each 25 lbs. (11.33 kg) of meat or 0.2 oz. (5.66 g) per 5 lbs. (2.26 kg) of meat.

 

Comminuted Meat (Sausages)

Cure #1 in ounces

Cure #1 in grams

Cure #1 in teaspoons

25 lbs.

1

28.35

5

5 lbs.

0.2

5.66

1

1 lb.

0.04

1.1

1/5

1 kg

0.08

2.5

1/2

Cured dry products - country ham, country style pork shoulder, prosciutto, etc. These products are prepared from a single piece of meat and the curing ingredients are rubbed into the surface of the meat several times during the curing period. Nitrite is applied to the surface of the meat or poultry as part of a cure mixture. If you look at the FSIS nitrite limits table on page 36 you will see that the maximum nitrite limit for Dry Cured Products (625 ppm) is four times higher than for Comminuted Products (156 ppm).

To cure meat for sausages (comminuted) and to stay within 156 ppm nitrite limit we have to apply no more than 1 oz of Cure #1 for each 25 lbs of meat. To dry cure 25 lbs of pork butts and to stay within 625 nitrite limits we need 4 times more of Cure #1, in our case 4 ounces. Keep in mind that when you add Cure #1 (there is 93.75% salt in it) you are adding extra salt to your meat and you may re-adjust your recipe.

 

From here: http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/118474/ryteks-recipe-and-cure-1#post_779117

post #27 of 38
This thread should be a sticky.
post #28 of 38

personaly i dont use cure #1 [instacure the pink stuff] for jerky. High Mountain and Nesco products have a measured amount of 1 tablespoon per pound of meat using Mortens Tenderquick i believe. for jerky i use the tenderquick, for smoked sausage i use the instacure at one tsp. per 5 pounds of meat as previously described.  when using tenderquick in a jerky recipe of your own, do not add any salt.  the main preserving agents to tenderquick are salt, sugar, both sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite [curing agents that also contribute to development of color and flavor] and it also has propylene glycol to keep the mixture uniform. Reinhard

post #29 of 38

This post caught my eye since I want to start using cure#1 when I make Salmon jerky.  My brine is the basic  brown sugar / salt mixture which sits for 3 hours which becomes pretty liquidly, then smoked for 2 hours, then into the dehydrator for 6+ hours.   So would I weigh just the Salmon or Salmon and the sugar/salt brine?  If just the Salmon, then the 5# of Salmon needs 1tsp of Cure#1 and I would add this to the Sugar/Salt brine?

post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

This post caught my eye since I want to start using cure#1 when I make Salmon jerky.  My brine is the basic  brown sugar / salt mixture which sits for 3 hours which becomes pretty liquidly, then smoked for 2 hours, then into the dehydrator for 6+ hours.   So would I weigh just the Salmon or Salmon and the sugar/salt brine?  If just the Salmon, then the 5# of Salmon needs 1tsp of Cure#1 and I would add this to the Sugar/Salt brine?

 

Craig, afternoon....   Yeah.... weighing is good...  3 hours is not enough time for penetration of the cure into the fish....  It is, however, enough time for the salt/sugar to do what you like to the fish....  It's obvious you like this method and it has made you some fine fish...  It has extracted moisture and added the right amounts of salt/sugar to your liking...

 

Below is a thread I did awhile back.....  I developed it over several years of smoking fish...   Using it, you don't have to watch the clock.... the fish can't get over sweet or over salty as the ingredients are proportioned by weight..... 

 

You weigh the meat, add the appropriate amount of mix, put in refer, rinse, smoke.....

 

I sprinkle the mix on the fish and put it in the refer for 1,2 or 3 days...  always comes out the way it is supposed to...

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/141708/trout-on-the-old-totem-smoker-finished-first-batch-5-26-13

 

Anyway, with a 3 hour rest, I don't know how to tell you to add cure safely......    

 

If you want to try my method and need help with it....  I'm here......    Dave

post #31 of 38

Dave,

Thanks for the prompt reply.   Yes, I was wondering if 3 hours of brining is long enough.  Being so thin (1/4" or less),  I noticed that brining it longer really takes away the Salmon flavor, increasing the brine flavor, thus why I only brine for such a short time.

 

Hmmmmm, what to do.

post #32 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

Dave,

Thanks for the prompt reply.   Yes, I was wondering if 3 hours of brining is long enough.  Being so thin (1/4" or less),  I noticed that brining it longer really takes away the Salmon flavor, increasing the brine flavor, thus why I only brine for such a short time.

 

Hmmmmm, what to do.

You need to change the brine for a 2-3 day brining period...    Did you read my thread on how I do it ????

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/141708/trout-on-the-old-totem-smoker-finished-first-batch-5-26-13

post #33 of 38

Yes I did read you post and might consider it.  Just can't see brining thin jerky meat 2-3 days without it taking away all the meat flavor.  Then again, I'm still pretty new at this stuff.

post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

Yes I did read you post and might consider it.  Just can't see brining thin jerky meat 2-3 days without it taking away all the meat flavor.  Then again, I'm still pretty new at this stuff.

If you like 2% salt and 2% sugar then that is what you add and it doesn't matter how long it sits in it....   You are probably adding way more than that, and that is why you only let it sit in there for 3 hours, to stop the salt and sugar addition penetration......  Curing is Physics and Chemistry...  Curing bacon takes 8-15 days....  there is no difference in the science....

post #35 of 38
This is So confusing if I have 5 pounds of pork and I wanna cure it for bacon I need 1 table spoon of cure 1 per give pounds of meat if I don't use liquid?
Edited by vince m - 7/16/17 at 8:40am
post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by vince m View Post

This is So confusing if I have 5 pounds of pork and I wanna cure it for bacon I need 1 table spoon of cure 1 per give pounds of meat if I don't ass liquid?

 

1 tsp. cure #1, per 5#'s......  teaspoon..... not tablespoon....

 

If you want to cure it in a brine/cure solution...   weigh the meat and liquid together..  add 1 tsp. cure #1 for every 5#'s of stuff...  

 

If you have a grams scale, which I think is important when curing, add 1.1 grams of cure #1, for every pound of stuff...

 

A good scale to get is one that weighs from 0-100 grams...   https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012LOQUQ?ref%5F=sr%5F1%5F1&qid=1497206885&sr=8-1&keywords=grams%20scale%20100%20grams&pldnSite=1  ..   similar to this .....     https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XWEAGRS?ref_=sr_1_1&qid=1497206885&sr=8-1&keywords=grams%2Bscale%2B100%2Bgrams&pldnSite=1&th=1  ..   with the calibration weight...

post #37 of 38
thanks for the info that was so much less confusing
post #38 of 38

Thumbs Up

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Making Jerky
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Making Jerky › Please help with measuring Cure # 1 for Jerky