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Coffee Roasters

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 

Craig posted a link to his favorite coffee site in another thread so I thought why not see how many other roasters are on here. Also what roaster are you using and where do you get your beans?


Here is my roaster

Click to enlarge Gene Cafe Roaster

Here is what I brew with 

JURA IMPRESSA C9 pianoblack


I get my beans from here - I try different beans all the time but our go to beans are the Monkey Roast and Classic Expresso blends



This company is very environmentally conscious and does flat rate shipping 


Looking forward to seeing what everyone else is using 

post #2 of 32

Never done that...I drink nothing but Community Dark Roast here at home...and I do not drink any of those flavored or fancy coffees ever...

post #3 of 32

Buy mine already roasted. Used to use old popcorn popper but I go through so much at home and office it was just easier to buy roasted.

post #4 of 32

Scar, I have been thinking about roasting my own for a while.  Williams Brewing sells roasters and green beans and I have been looking there.  Soon another hobby for this old retired guy.  Thanks for opening this area up.  Steve

post #5 of 32

Roasting your own is like making pulled pork or sausage...


Once you get started you will never look back.


I have some nice equipment that I have had for quite a few years.


I would not buy another i-roaster..  prolly get a bemor or the fresh roast sr500.


You also need a nice brewer..chemex or a press. I have several presses..including a real nice titanium 2 cupper I used when backpacking.


A  burr mill grinder is also a needed item. Splatttering fine beans with a blade is blasphemy..called "the chunk and powder routine"...


I quit roasting for a bit..my wife defiles coffee with coffee mate horrid tasting concoctions...hated seeing my fine roasted beans made into foul swill.


Now I buy the cheapest crap at the discount store for her and I make my own...


I would say get the whole kit cause you will end up with it anyway...sorta like what we do here..


Captains give free shipping with a 200 buck purchase..new owners..nice folks..


A lot of good reading there too..



post #6 of 32

What a great reminder Gary. You and I have discussed this before, but all the craziness sometimes gets in the way. I did do some research, but that was a while ago. This is definitely something I want to get involved with. Thanks buddy for the reminder. sausage.gif



To craig - I love your sig. Heheheheeeeeeeeeee.

post #7 of 32

Wow looking over all the types of coffee...roasters...grinders...brewers...it looks like people have the same love affair with coffee as some do with single malt scotch!!beercheer.gif I might have to look into this a little more...i love a good cup of coffee!!! Thanks Gary and Craig for the information!!!

post #8 of 32

Just looked at the captains coffee site, and their prices are much less than williams brewing.  Thanks for the info on this site.  Steve

post #9 of 32
Scarbelly, the Gene is an excellent home roaster one I will consider when my stircrasy/turbo oven home made roaster craps out for good. Still working on almost 10 yrs.

Get most of my beans from the green coffee buying club
post #10 of 32

Coffee roasting is such a rewarding hobby! I've been doing it for 5 or 6 years now. I started with an iRoast that lasted a couple years before one plastic piece broke, no replacements available. Replaced that with a Behmor drum roaster that I just love!


Morning cup comes from the cheapest superautomatic, a Saeco Vienna Plus which I'm also very fond of.


I would recommend that the coffee lovers here try out the Aeropress. It seems like a gimmick, but it makes outstanding coffee and has earned quite a reputation and following as a unique process resulting in it's own style of coffee.


The wife loves cold brew coffee, which she refers to as "Rocket Fuel" for it's extra caffeine content and makes a jug or two a week.

post #11 of 32
Thread Starter 

I started with a stovetop then moved on to the iRoast - when it died the second time, I got the Gene Cafe.  We roast so much coffee that I send around the country to family and friends that the Gene Cafe just seemed to be the right choice. 


We take the Jura in the motorhome and folks just laugh at us for being so goofy about our coffee.  Need to find something less expensive as the motorhome is not too friendly to equipment when bouncing down the road. 


When I talk to people about home roasting and they realize that the cost of the beans is less than 1/2 what they are paying for the processed junk a light comes on - maybe this is worth the trouble and initial expense. 


Great posts so far - keep them coming 

post #12 of 32
Thread Starter 

Here is a great article on home roasting from a site Craig mentioned - The Captains Coffee



Why Home Coffee Roasting?

Maybe you're looking around our site and asking yourself, "Can I really roast my own coffee beans at home?" Not only is the answer "Yes, you can" but it is also "Yes, you should"! There are a few old hard-heads out there who might not agree, but over and over we hear from people who say their first cup of home roasted coffee is the best cup they've ever had. We certainly think so!

So why would you roast your own green coffee beans?

  • Home coffee roasting does not require a lot of special equipment, it doesn't take a lot of time, and it won't break the bank.
  • What home roasting WILL do is open up a whole new world of flavors and aromas
  • It allow you to roast as light or dark as your particular taste desires
  • Roasting coffee at home lets you roast only the amount of coffee you need at a time so there is no waste or need to ever drink flat, stale coffee.

We often tell people the difference in fresh, home roasted coffee and commercial coffee is like the difference in a tomato right out of your garden and one off a supermarket shelf. There simply is no comparison. Priscilla perhaps said it best when we roasted our first batch of coffee at home years ago, even though we didn't have a clue what we were doing. Her eyes lit up and she said, “This is what coffee is supposed to taste like!”

We never looked back.

So coffee tastes better when fresh. But is it difficult?

Home coffee roasting can be as simple or as technical as you care to be. Your roaster can range from a skillet to a Gene Café. A popcorn air popper makes a fine coffee roaster. A lot of folks start with one and then move on to a dedicated roaster when they realize they can't possibly drink that stuff in a brick again! Depending on your roaster and batch size, roasting only takes between 5 and 30 minutes. A full 16 ounce pound of premium single estate specialty grade (highest) green coffee costs about half what a 12 ounce bag of Star***** roasted coffee sells for in the supermarket, and goodness knows how old it is.

How to store coffee that's unroasted

Green coffee has a very long shelf life. Although there is disagreement among coffee professionals, some say you can keep it up to 10 years with no degradation. While that might be a bit long, a general consensus is about two years. If you'll simply treat it like you would dry pinto beans--keep it out of direct sunlight and keep it dry, and it will keep a good long time.

Once you roast it, then the clock starts. Now think of your roasted coffee like you would fresh bread. Protect it from oxygen (we use old fashioned canning jars--the kind with the metal latch and the rubber seal), and only roast what you'll use in the next 3-5 days. Just like bread, freshness makes a world of difference in coffee. But if you haven't tried it, how could you know?

Convinced yet?

There is a whole world of flavors and aromas waiting for you to discover. We offer many specialty grade coffees that are superb as single origins, and you are really limited only by your imagination when it comes to creating your own "signature" blend possibilities. Our offerings are continually changing with the seasons, so check back often.

Home coffee roasting is easy, quick, economical and delicious. But maybe the best reason is that it is just plain fun. Why not give it a shot? We're betting you'll be just like us--the first sip of fresh, home roasted coffee and you know right then you'll never go back to that grocery store swill!

post #13 of 32

popcorn.gif......   Coffee.gif......   I may have to quit reading this thread...... I don't need another hobby...  The kitchen is full of stuff I bought since joining this forum....   And the freezer is full of wonderful smoked meats.... fridge full of smoked cheese...  cabinets full of spices...  I buy vac-bags by the 100's....  pellets 40#'s at a time.....   meats, a case at a time.... bacon costs cut in half....  everything is cheaper.....  ???????    

I have an air popper.... burr grinder..... I'm almost there.....  

I think I'll keep reading for awhile...  

post #14 of 32
Originally Posted by Mammoth View Post

Coffee roasting is such a rewarding hobby! I've been doing it for 5 or 6 years now. I started with an iRoast that lasted a couple years before one plastic piece broke, no replacements available. Replaced that with a Behmor drum roaster that I just love!


I have read a few things about the Behmor.


How long have you had yours???


Any issues with it????




Edited by fpnmf - 9/11/12 at 10:35am
post #15 of 32
Thread Starter 

Hey Craig

Here is a link to a great review on that roaster 



post #16 of 32
Originally Posted by fpnmf View Post

I have read a few things about the Behmor.


How long have you had yours???


Any issues with it????




I've had it for about a year and a half. I'm roasting once or twice a week, with no problems at all.


One common 'complaint' about the Behmor is that it may not get you to really dark roasts. I've found that I can get plenty of flexibility and as dark as I want by stopping the cycle 3 minutes in and starting over. At the end, you add time in 15 second increments as you approach second crack.


Some may consider that an issue, I just consider it part of learning to use that particular roaster.

post #17 of 32
Thread Starter 

Here are some other site links to help anyone wanting to get started in this great hobby


I have personally use Whole Latte Love for several purchases and find them to be especially helpful and very knowledgeable. They will also price match anyone  



Here is another site that has some great equipment reviews and some tutorials 



Here is another great resource for reviews both by the site owners and end users


post #18 of 32

Wow! A coffee roasting thread! how cool...


I have been roasting green coffee beans since 2005 and never looked back.


I buy select gourmet green coffee beans at excellent prices from SweetMarias.com




I now use a Behmor 1600 roaster as my old iRoast went kaput and that company stopped making and supporting them.


Behmor 1600



I like the Behmor much better anyway and roast a 12 ounce batch on the 1 lb setting and switch it to cool down manually when the look and smell of the beans are right.


I also have...


a Rancilio Rocky Burr Grinder w/o Doser





a La Pavoni Pisa PA 35 espresso machine

Enlarge la Pavoni PA-35 Pisa Espresso Maker - Chrome


a Technivorm Moccamaster coffee brewer




and a Salter model 3001 digital food scale




Oxygen is the enemy of coffee, thus I store my fresh roasted coffee beans in air-tight stainless canisters which have a one way check valve to allow the beans to out-gas post roasting without letting in oxygen thus preserving the flavor at a very high level. My fresh roasted coffee storage canisters are similar to this one from Friis with the CO2 vent






I grind beans only when I brew to also preserve the full level of flavor. Ground coffee will lose its flavor at a tremendous rate soon after grinding if not brewed right away.


-Concho Kitty

Edited by ConchoKitty - 9/11/12 at 2:17pm
post #19 of 32

I do that with my Behmor also. Start it up for 2 minutes with the coffee loaded already, shut it off then start it up again and increase the time extender as far as it will let me... then stop it when I decide it is ready  for the cool down cycle. 12 ounce measured coffee batch weight running on the 1 lb roaster setting.



Mammoth said: One common 'complaint' about the Behmor is that it may not get you to really dark roasts. I've found that I can get plenty of flexibility and as dark as I want by stopping the cycle 3 minutes in and starting over. At the end, you add time in 15 second increments as you approach second crack.

Edited by ConchoKitty - 9/11/12 at 1:44pm
post #20 of 32

I did it!!!


Just ordered the Behmoor...


Captains Coffee is giving 5 pounds of beans with the purchase and a pound of some new African for coffee week.


And free shipping..


Sooo ended up with 15 pounds of beans and a new roaster...362 bucks...not too shabby..



Quantity Name SKU Price Subtotal
1 India, Monsooned Malabar, AA Gold IM $5.97 $5.97
2 Costa Rica Tarrazu Asoproaaa CRTA $6.51 $13.02
2 Uganda, Bugisu, AA Double Picked UBDP $6.08 $12.16
4 Yemen Mocca Sanani YS $8.10 $32.40
1 Behmor 1600 B1600 $299.00 $299.00
SubTotal : $362.55
Shipping and Handling Fee : $0.00
Tax Total : $0.00
Total: $362.55
Customer's note:
We are going to give away 1 pound of our Rwanda Rulindo coffee to every customer that orders on the 29th.

The 5 pounds with the Behmoor can be the Costa Rica Tarrazu Asoproaaa and the Uganda, Bugisu, AA Double Picked ..you told me I could pick the 5 with an order,,so thanks... Craig

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