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Confusing dry curing with dry curing....... - Page 2

post #21 of 27

Can the bacon and ham's be smoked without curing them? What is the advantage to having it cured?

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Burrell View Post

Can the bacon and ham's be smoked without curing them? What is the advantage to having it cured?

Dick, afternoon and welcome to the forum.....  Without curing, you have smoked pork....  curing is the first step in making bacon and ham...  smoking completes the process...  You can have smoked pork, corned/cured pork, and when you combine the 2 processes you get bacon and/or  ham...  Contrary to some folks, properly cured food is healthy and safe to eat..... curing adds flavor and the pink color to pork....

 

 

Please take a moment and stop into " /Roll Call/  " and introduce yourself and get a proper welcome from our members.... Also, if you would note your location in your profile, it will help in the future when answering questions about smokin'...   elevation, humidity etc....    

We're glad you stopped in and joined our group...    Enjoy the long smokey ride....     Dave

post #23 of 27

Just adding to the confusion....

 

http://www.mortonsalt.com/for-your-home/culinary-salts/meat-curing-methods

 

Dry Curing

Best used to cure hams, bacon and smaller cuts of meat, dry curing involves you applying the cure mix directly on the meat. After the application, place meat into a plastic food storage bag and tightly seal. From there, put your meat in the refrigerator and let the curing process take place. After curing, remove excess salt by rinsing your meat. The final step then is to cook your meat and taste.

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bregent View Post

Just adding to the confusion....

http://www.mortonsalt.com/for-your-home/culinary-salts/meat-curing-methods

Dry Curing



Best used to cure hams, bacon and smaller cuts of meat, dry curing involves you applying the cure mix directly on the meat. After the application, place meat into a plastic food storage bag and tightly seal. From there, put your meat in the refrigerator and let the curing process take place. After curing, remove excess salt by rinsing your meat. The final step then is to cook your meat and taste.


That note from the Morton folks is not dry curing...... Please delete it..... Why would you want to confuse folks on such an important issue... Food safety is not to be taken lightly.....
post #25 of 27

>Why would you want to confuse folks on such an important issue

 

My intent is not to confuse anyone. I'm brand new to the hobby, having never cured anything till just last week. I had received an old copy of Morton's 'Home Meat Curing Guide', 1988 , I figured they were experts on the subject since, as you know, manufacture very popular cures. 

After familiarizing myself somewhat with the subject from their literature and website I came to this forum and found a lot of difference of opinion on what 'Dry Curing' is. There certainly is not a consensus here from what I can tell. 

 

>... Food safety is not to be taken lightly.....

 

Not sure where you coming from with that one. I don't see how quoting a popular source and opening it up for discussion is dangerous. 

 

> Please delete it

 

A moderator can delete it if they think it poses a safety concern. I'm sure I'm not the only newbie that's visited the mortonsalt.com website. Rather than delete the post and making believe it doesn't exist, maybe you or other experts can talk to it and explain why it should be ignored. I'm sure that the curing processes are very clear in your mind, but to beginners like me, it is still quite confusing.

post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 
Morton doesn't necessarily follow recommend cure limits and the like so they publish a lot of confusing and down right bad information.
It makes it difficult to educate folks because they do see Morton as an authority.

But, it's not just Morton's, there's bad information and mistakes everywhere....some of the most popular books by Kutas, the Marianski's, etc. contain bad information and very serious mistakes.


~Martin
post #27 of 27

Just to add a little more confusion as it really does depend on whether you are dry curing, dry curing or dry curing. When dry curing some sausage you use a fermentation culture to increase the acidity to inhibit unwanted bacterial growth and less nitrite. When making Salami or Chorizo for instance you will also add a blend of acidifying and flavouring bacteria right at the beginning. For the fermented dry cured sausage there is another important (but possibly unintuative) difference in its production. As soon as you add the curing salts and culture mix to the meat you need to keep the sausage at room temperature to give the added fermentation bacteria the environment it needs to multiply quickly and become dominant.

 

I am agreeing with what has been said previously in this thread - the different methods of "dry curing" are each designed to produce a different type of product. It is very important that this is recognised and the correct nitrite levels are used for the particular end product that is being produced.

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