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Beef short ribs - Page 2

post #21 of 38
If doinf beef short ribs, should I get them close to room temp prior to putting in the smoke?
post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgosnell151 View Post

If doinf beef short ribs, should I get them close to room temp prior to putting in the smoke?

 

There's no real benefit in doing that when cooking low & slow, especially when smoking. Smoke will accumulate on cold and moist meats better than warm or hot, so colder meats will take on more smoke flavor if they can heat through slower...warming to room temp will hinder this to some degree, not to mention the possible food safety issues which could arise for larger cuts of compromised or macerated muscle which take longer to pass through the danger-zone temps. Some chefs temper the meat for certain dishes they prepare, but I think truth be told, it has limited benefits, and probably only with certain cooking methods, being hot & fast.

 

 

Eric

post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by forluvofsmoke View Post
 

 

There's no real benefit in doing that when cooking low & slow, especially when smoking. Smoke will accumulate on cold and moist meats better than warm or hot, so colder meats will take on more smoke flavor if they can heat through slower...warming to room temp will hinder this to some degree, not to mention the possible food safety issues which could arise for larger cuts of compromised or macerated muscle which take longer to pass through the danger-zone temps. Some chefs temper the meat for certain dishes they prepare, but I think truth be told, it has limited benefits, and probably only with certain cooking methods, being hot & fast.

 

 

Eric

 

I am of the opinion that when putting a steak on the grill closer to room temp makes a much more tender finished product, this is why I asked about the shortribs.  I put a steak out about 40 minutes prior to cooking... so is cooked well within the 4 hour time frame.

post #24 of 38
beef is different. you can do things with beef that you cant do with chicken or pork. i throw them straight from the reefer or i've also let them sit out while prepping the rest of whatever it may be im cooking. you can pretty much do whatever you want when it comes to beef.
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurnandBurn View Post

beef is different. you can do things with beef that you cant do with chicken or pork. i throw them straight from the reefer or i've also let them sit out while prepping the rest of whatever it may be im cooking. you can pretty much do whatever you want when it comes to beef.

 

Type or cut of beef, pork, bird, doesn't matter, if it is USDA inspected. USDA inspected means the potentially hazardous food (PHF) has met the criteria used for inspection and should be safe for consumption should it be stored, handled and cooked according to generally recognized as safe (GRAS) methods. I've done things with chicken pieces that a few others here questioned as well (which brought out some good discussion also), like a warm smoke in a charcoal grill @ 110-120* for an hour prior to dropping in hot coals for a 30-45 minute sear to finish cooking. Bone-in, boneless, doesn't matter...cooking is fast enough with these smaller pieces to mitigate risk of illness, and have done that very same thing with pork and beef of various smaller cuts...have used this method for nearly 5 years. Pasteurizing the surface and getting up to safe temp within 4 hours is the only real concern you should have, no matter the cut or type of PHF. To my knowledge you could do this with fish or shellfish if you so chose to do so...not that I can think of a good reason why I would, and I haven't to date, so I haven't done any further researched on that topic.

 

The flip-side is the larger cuts which are de-boned, injected or otherwise punctured, pierced, stuffed, filleted/rolled, or otherwise be prepared in a matter which would compromise the muscle, including chopping/grinding (in the case of meat loaves, for example)...that's where you're taking more risk by letting it warm through before actually beginning to cook it with heat, as it could extend your danger-zone temps well beyond the recommended time frame when dealing with compromised muscle. With intact whole muscle, the only real concern is to pasteurize the surface and finish cooking to minimum internal temp within a reasonable amount of time...how long of time is considered to be safe? No one has really ever stated, that I know of, but when cooking low & slow, 225* seems to be considered adequate (or GRAS) to accomplish both when cooking all but the largest standard cuts, with exceptions being (but not limited to) whole beef shoulder clod. I've had pork shoulder cuts and beef brisket take well above 24 hours to reach my desired finished temps when maintaining 225* chamber temps...and they may have been 6 or more hours to reach 135* I/T...doesn't matter, as they were intact whole muscle.

 

 

Eric

post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgosnell151 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by forluvofsmoke View Post
 

 

There's no real benefit in doing that when cooking low & slow, especially when smoking. Smoke will accumulate on cold and moist meats better than warm or hot, so colder meats will take on more smoke flavor if they can heat through slower...warming to room temp will hinder this to some degree, not to mention the possible food safety issues which could arise for larger cuts of compromised or macerated muscle which take longer to pass through the danger-zone temps. Some chefs temper the meat for certain dishes they prepare, but I think truth be told, it has limited benefits, and probably only with certain cooking methods, being hot & fast.

 

 

Eric

 

I am of the opinion that when putting a steak on the grill closer to room temp makes a much more tender finished product, this is why I asked about the shortribs.  I put a steak out about 40 minutes prior to cooking... so is cooked well within the 4 hour time frame.

 

Yes, and that is similar to the handling/cooking method of warm smoke prior to searing, as I described in my above reply, with the only difference in the reason behind it being to accumulate more smoke on my meat or poultry prior to reaching finished temp. Whether or not it creates a condition which produces a more tender meat when using a warm smoke chamber? It may very well be that it does, but that would be a bonus for my intents and purposes.

 

 

Eric

post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurnandBurn View Post

beef is different. you can do things with beef that you cant do with chicken or pork. i throw them straight from the reefer or i've also let them sit out while prepping the rest of whatever it may be im cooking. you can pretty much do whatever you want when it comes to beef.

 

That is a pretty broad statement and can be misinterpreted! Because Bacteria take awhile to get used to a temp change and ramp up to multiplying, Lag Phase of their growth cycle, there is some wiggle room. This is how restaurants can safely trim, slice and bread a 40Lb case of Chicken Breast for cutlets with out making their customers sick. It is also why it is safe to let Beef Steaks or a Rib Roast warm on the counter for a couple hours so they cook to Med/Rare more evenly...BUT...As Eric pointed out if the surface of the meat is compromised allowing bacteria to get to the Interior of the meat, including Grinding, De-boning, Injecting or punching holes in the meat to stuff Garlic and or Herbs into the interior, especially risky because anything grown in dirt can carry the bacteria that causes Botulism, then there is no time to rest on the counter! The clock is ticking and that meat needs to get cooked, IT above 135°F ASAP, with 4 hours being our goal for safety. In this case Beef Ribs warming, no big deal although anything you plan to cook well done, warming gains you Nothing. It won't be more tender, and the very slight cook time difference is not worth the VERY REAL possibility that juices from the warming meat may contact other kitchen surfaces, like the counter or your hands as you casually move the meat out of your way to chop Lettuce for your Salad...Bottom line yes Beef is Different because we frequently cook INTACT Steaks and Roasts to temps other than Well done, 165°F. But beyond that and ESPECIALLY if the surface of the meat is compromised in any way, Cook/Smoke at 225°F or higher and go from Refer to Smoker with no resting to warm the meat...BTW...Fish are typically thin fillets made of much less dense muscle than land animals so the flesh warms up very quickly allowing for bacteria to grow sooner and faster. Although the processor, Mom and Pop seafood stores are regulated and inspected for FDA and State HACCP Program compliance to reduce the mishandling of fish, there is not an On-site Inspector watching every cut. The chance of contamination from gutting and cutting is higher requiring that Seafood be kept cold, preferably on Ice, until it is Smoked or cooked...JJ

post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post

 

That is a pretty broad statement and can be misinterpreted! Because Bacteria take awhile to get used to a temp change and ramp up to multiplying, Lag Phase of their growth cycle, there is some wiggle room. This is how restaurants can safely trim, slice and bread a 40Lb case of Chicken Breast for cutlets with out making their customers sick. It is also why it is safe to let Beef Steaks or a Rib Roast warm on the counter for a couple hours so they cook to Med/Rare more evenly...BUT...As Eric pointed out if the surface of the meat is compromised allowing bacteria to get to the Interior of the meat, including Grinding, De-boning, Injecting or punching holes in the meat to stuff Garlic and or Herbs into the interior, especially risky because anything grown in dirt can carry the bacteria that causes Botulism, then there is no time to rest on the counter! The clock is ticking and that meat needs to get cooked, IT above 135°F ASAP, with 4 hours being our goal for safety. In this case Beef Ribs warming, no big deal although anything you plan to cook well done, warming gains you Nothing. It won't be more tender, and the very slight cook time difference is not worth the VERY REAL possibility that juices from the warming meat may contact other kitchen surfaces, like the counter or your hands as you casually move the meat out of your way to chop Lettuce for your Salad...Bottom line yes Beef is Different because we frequently cook INTACT Steaks and Roasts to temps other than Well done, 165°F. But beyond that and ESPECIALLY if the surface of the meat is compromised in any way, Cook/Smoke at 225°F or higher and go from Refer to Smoker with no resting to warm the meat...BTW...Fish are typically thin fillets made of much less dense muscle than land animals so the flesh warms up very quickly allowing for bacteria to grow sooner and faster. Although the processor, Mom and Pop seafood stores are regulated and inspected for FDA and State HACCP Program compliance to reduce the mishandling of fish, there is not an On-site Inspector watching every cut. The chance of contamination from gutting and cutting is higher requiring that Seafood be kept cold, preferably on Ice, until it is Smoked or cooked...JJ

 



idk how it could be misinterpreted...the guy asked if he could treat beef short ribs like a steak as far as leaving them out. i gave him an answer. i nor he ever said anything about surface being compromised or breading cutlets or seafood/shellfish... this isnt rocket science, i just tried to keep it simple for the guy.
post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurnandBurn View Post

beef is different. you can do things with beef that you cant do with chicken or pork. i throw them straight from the reefer or i've also let them sit out while prepping the rest of whatever it may be im cooking. you can pretty much do whatever you want when it comes to beef.

This is an EASILY misinterpreted and reckless statement!!! You can NEVER assume the OP is the only one reading your posts and will simply understand, "what you meant".

 

Regarding..."  i nor he ever said anything about surface being compromised or breading cutlets or seafood/shellfish..." No you didn't. But since you neglected to be clear...I...Had to fill in the blanks with examples of when you CAN'T " pretty much do whatever you want when it comes to beef. The example or Breading Cutlets explains WHY there is time to prep or let un-compromised meat warm for a short time and Eric was unsure about warm smoking Fish so I answered His question. You are correct again, This is not Rocket Science...IT'S MORE DANGEROUS! An Aerospace Engineer has never been killed designing a Rocket! But HUNDREDS of people DIE from Food Poisoning every year!!!

 

Here are our Rules regarding posts that respond to or are regarding a possible safety issue. Taken directly from the Safety Forum Guidelines...JJ

 

Always take into consideration that the member asking the question, or others reading the question and answers, are not sure if they are risking the Health of themselves and loved ones and does not know what to do...

Read the post and give Complete and Detailed answers...Random statements that are Vague, General or nonspecific that can't be supported by anything other than, " That's the way my Grandmother did it." can be confusing and potentially dangerous... http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/f/181/food-safety

post #30 of 38

Just did my first rack of Beef short ribs and they came out great using my Vision ceramic smoker. Had some people say they had no luck with them but they came out perfect. I smoked them with some Pecan for 3hr then wrapped them 2hr and they got to 190 degrees took them out of the foil they dropped to 182 i then cooked them for 2 or 2 1/2 more hrs and took it off at 189 degrees removed meat from bone was like butter and a nice smoke ring also :yahoo:

post #31 of 38
Very nice!!
post #32 of 38

Hello: 

 

the three most important things are 

1) remove the thick skin membrane from the back ( inner curved part ) of the ribs - Pull off after seperating.

2) use a rub and / or salt pepper to taste 

3) thicker ribs will take time  200 -225 degrees at 3 up to 6 hours 

 

enjoy  - remember internal temperature to be safe 180 -185 or more . 

post #33 of 38

ALSO - remember you may need to add more chips or chunks after 1 -2 hours 

post #34 of 38

This is my second attempt at smoking beef short ribs and, although they are juicy, I can't quite get that "fall off the bone" tenderness.  I cut the silver skin off as best as I could.  I tried the 3-2-1 method again.  I did not braise them though, just put them all into an aluminum pan covered with foil.  Did the hour after in smoke again.  After I pulled them all from the smoker, I was going to let them rest but noticed they just weren't super tender so I wrapped them again and put them in my 200* convect oven for a good 30-45 minutes.  They have great flavor but I never get a bark or ring on mine (or anything for that matter) and they're just not as tender as I would want.  My chuckies always turn out great!  No bark but deliciously tender and flavorful.  

 

I'm using a Masterbuilt Electric Smokehouse (with a window).

 

Any suggestions?

post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailin Gal View Post
 

This is my second attempt at smoking beef short ribs and, although they are juicy, I can't quite get that "fall off the bone" tenderness.  I cut the silver skin off as best as I could.  I tried the 3-2-1 method again.  

 

I did not braise them though, just put them all into an aluminum pan covered with foil.

 

Did you add any foiling liquid, the foiling stage is so the meat can steam and tender a bit. Next time try one of the foiling liquid recipes from on the boards here, it will make 'em fall off the bone if not careful. Actually with short ribs I would probably reduce that foiling time.

 

 Did the hour after in smoke again.  After I pulled them all from the smoker, I was going to let them rest but noticed they just weren't super tender so I wrapped them again and put them in my 200* convect oven for a good 30-45 minutes.  

 

They have great flavor but I never get a bark or ring on mine (or anything for that matter) and they're just not as tender as I would want.  My chuckies always turn out great!  No bark but deliciously tender and flavorful.  

 

You don't normally see the bark on a short rib that you'd see say on a dino. As to the smoke ring, you're using an electric you'll not see a smoke ring. They just don't make 'em.

 

I'm using a Masterbuilt Electric Smokehouse (with a window).

 

Any suggestions?

post #36 of 38

So I am getting ready to smoke some ribs. I am confused. In a pan or straight on the grill rack??? Dry or Wet to smoke?

post #37 of 38

Finally got around to smoking some ribs. These were cut by the processor when we bought half a cow from a friend. Everyone really likes them, and most were very tender.

 

 

post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeW999 View Post

Finally got around to smoking some ribs. These were cut by the processor when we bought half a cow from a friend. Everyone really likes them, and most were very tender.





What temperature and how long did you smoke these for? I'm doing some this weekend I got from a processor when I bought a quarter recently and would like the input
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