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Mr T's "Smoked Cheese From Go To Show" w/ Q- View - Page 10

post #181 of 197

My first post here ...

 

I did a marathon smoking on our last Holiday weekend and now have some Smoked Cheese.

 

I purchased this:

 

Prepped them like this (Started on a Gasser but moved it to the Green Egg):

 

Smoked them in a Green Egg w/ an AMNPS for for about 5 hours (AMNPS went out twice until I found the sweet spot / Vent Openings) at night, Temp kept under 65 deg.

 

Results:

 

I left them on the counter to cool / dry, then Vac Packed them and placed them in the wine fridge @ 55 deg.

 

It has been 3 weeks and I am torn between leaving them like that until I want to use or ordering Cheese Wax.

 

Is it worth the effort of waxing this cheese (Do I have to worry about ammonia, acetic acid, & CO2 affecting taste. Or does this occur in non aged cheeses) ?

 

What does a better job of aging Cheese, before smoking or after?

 

FYI The other smoked items:

 

Round Bone Roasts and Beef Short Ribs

 

The Round Bone Roasts made some Texas no Bean Chili

 

The Beef Short Ribs were for Saturday Dinner w/ Smoked Manhattans (using the Smoking Gun)

 

Sunday Night was a Brisket (Sorry No Pics).

 

Monday Night was cold smoked Bone in Rib eyes cooked Sous Vide (Using a Beer Cooler w/ 135deg water for 2 hr)  then finished on a smoking hot cast iron skillet with a blowtorch (Also No Pics).

 

Thanks in advance for your replies!

post #182 of 197

I'd be for waxing all that cheese...either wax it or have it destroyed with mold...sooner the better. You may want to read back through on the soft cheese...I don't smoke it, so don't deal with the necessary steps involved.

 

 

Eric

post #183 of 197

I just had a little chat with Mr T and he reminded me that you should not wax soft cheeses, but you definitely should wax the hard cheeses for longer aging. Vac-pack the softer cheese.

 

 

Eric

post #184 of 197

Thanks!

 

I ordered 5 lbs of wax.

 

The Buffalo Moz didn't last a week!

 

I tried a few pieces at the 3 week mark and WOW.

 

Tell Mr. T Thanks also.

 

Jeff

post #185 of 197

Ok.. I've got a question, which is more out of curiosity than anything else..

 

I just smoked my first batch of cheese, (http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/254896/giving-this-smoking-cheese-a-shot) and I am pretty happy so far (I haven't tasted it yet, but seems good :biggrin:), and then this thread was given to read when asking about storage...

 

In Mr. T's original post, and as others have stated - "Place in a zip type bag leaving a small opening to keep condensation from forming and allow it to set on a rack at room temperature for a day"   What is the point of the zip lock?  I understand why to let it rest (moisture dries), and why if you use a Zip lock, why you would leave it open (again moisture), but why use one at all?  What is the benefit, or is it just a personal preference thing?  I just took my cheese off the smoker racks, put them on some cookie racks, and in the fridge they went.  Maybe I should have just kept them outside of the fridge, but I chose the fridge. to let them dry.  My only complaint, and it was mentioned somewhere in the thread, is the smell of the smoke in my fridge, as they dried.  Would the zip lock help with that?

post #186 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikedaub View Post

Ok.. I've got a question, which is more out of curiosity than anything else..

I just smoked my first batch of cheese, (http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/254896/giving-this-smoking-cheese-a-shot) and I am pretty happy so far (I haven't tasted it yet, but seems good biggrin.gif ), and then this thread was given to read when asking about storage...

In Mr. T's original post, and as others have stated - "Place in a zip type bag leaving a small opening to keep condensation from forming and allow it to set on a rack at room temperature for a day"   What is the point of the zip lock?  I understand why to let it rest (moisture dries), and why if you use a Zip lock, why you would leave it open (again moisture), but why use one at all?  What is the benefit, or is it just a personal preference thing?  I just took my cheese off the smoker racks, put them on some cookie racks, and in the fridge they went.  Maybe I should have just kept them outside of the fridge, but I chose the fridge. to let them dry.  My only complaint, and it was mentioned somewhere in the thread, is the smell of the smoke in my fridge, as they dried.  Would the zip lock help with that?

Sorry for the delay, I just talked to Tom and he gave the following:

In Mr. T's original post, and as others have stated - "Place in a zip type bag leaving a small opening to keep condensation from forming and allow it to set on a rack at room temperature for a day" (only hard cheeses) What is the point of the zip lock? (sanitation) I understand why to let it rest (moisture dries), and why if you use a Zip lock, why you would leave it open (again moisture), but why use one at all? What is the benefit, or is it just a personal preference thing? (again, sanitation) I just took my cheese off the smoker racks, put them on some cookie racks, and in the fridge they went. Maybe I should have just kept them outside of the fridge, but I chose the fridge. To let them dry. My only complaint, and it was mentioned somewhere in the thread, is the smell of the smoke in my fridge, as they dried. Would the zip lock help with that? (yes, it also helps contain the smoke aroma)


Keep in mind that hard cheeses including cheddar can be kept at room temperature, 70° or below, for a length of time. By keeping the hard cheese in a bag overnight, a skin will develop on the cheese which then helps assist in waxing. Cheese may be vac sealed as soon as all moisture has dissipated, no need to keep it longer unless it is going to be waxed. If oils are on the surface, caused by smoking at too high of a temperature, go ahead and vac seal.

Soft cheeses can be placed at room temperature until moisture, if any, has dissipated, then either consumed or vac sealed, never waxed.

All cheeses should be consumed at room temperature in order to highlight it's aroma.

A clean, smooth smoke will make an extraordinarily delightful smoked cheese right out of the smoker.
post #187 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by bauchjw View Post


Sorry for the delay, I just talked to Tom and he gave the following:

In Mr. T's original post, and as others have stated - "Place in a zip type bag leaving a small opening to keep condensation from forming and allow it to set on a rack at room temperature for a day" (only hard cheeses) What is the point of the zip lock? (sanitation) I understand why to let it rest (moisture dries), and why if you use a Zip lock, why you would leave it open (again moisture), but why use one at all? What is the benefit, or is it just a personal preference thing? (again, sanitation) I just took my cheese off the smoker racks, put them on some cookie racks, and in the fridge they went. Maybe I should have just kept them outside of the fridge, but I chose the fridge. To let them dry. My only complaint, and it was mentioned somewhere in the thread, is the smell of the smoke in my fridge, as they dried. Would the zip lock help with that? (yes, it also helps contain the smoke aroma)


Keep in mind that hard cheeses including cheddar can be kept at room temperature, 70° or below, for a length of time. By keeping the hard cheese in a bag overnight, a skin will develop on the cheese which then helps assist in waxing. Cheese may be vac sealed as soon as all moisture has dissipated, no need to keep it longer unless it is going to be waxed. If oils are on the surface, caused by smoking at too high of a temperature, go ahead and vac seal.

Soft cheeses can be placed at room temperature until moisture, if any, has dissipated, then either consumed or vac sealed, never waxed.

All cheeses should be consumed at room temperature in order to highlight it's aroma.

A clean, smooth smoke will make an extraordinarily delightful smoked cheese right out of the smoker.

 

 

So, essentially, the addition of the bag while letting it rest is just for sanitation purposes..  Great.. Thanks..

post #188 of 197
Mr. T I have a question about some new cheese I came across. It is a hard semi soft

How would I attempt to wax this or should I.
post #189 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatcho View Post

Mr. T I have a question about some new cheese I came across. It is a hard semi soft

How would I attempt to wax this or should I.

 

Due to the surface texture (peppercorns) I think you would destroy the cheese by waxing (when wax is removed it would take peppercorns with it). Also, if it is not a hard cheese it should not be waxed.

 

I'll forward your question to Mr T and get back with you ASAP.

 

 

Eric

post #190 of 197
Thread Starter 

I cannot advise waxing this cheese. I you do, wrap it in cheesecloth in order for the wax not to come into contact with the surface of the cheese.

 

T

post #191 of 197
Thread Starter 

Been getting similar questions from individuals, so thought I would attempt to answer them here.

 

Question: Does cheese need to sit for a period of time before consumption?

 

Answer: No, many tend to over smoke their cheese making it inedible when it comes out of the smoker, thereby they vac-seal it and let it set sometimes for months before they can consume it. You don’t deliberately over smoke a chicken then let it rest for weeks before eating it, so why would you do it to cheese?

 

For an example as to learn how to smoke cheese that is edible right after being smoked, take a block of cheddar and cut it into bite sizes. While taking good notes, place the pieces into your smoker/product chamber and begin applying smoke. At 20 or 30-minute intervals take a taste test of one of your samples. When you get to your desired taste, pull the cheese, you are done. This can be done using many different smoke applications.

 

The heavier and more dense the smoke the sooner it will be done, possibly in as little as a few minutes. A lighter, thin smoke applied from a distant fire box may take hours. This is something you have to take into consideration when being advised as to how long to smoke a product without knowing the kind of smoke used.

 

When done, note the color of your cheese, this is what you want to shoot for in future smokes. The color of the cheese will depend on the type of smoke being used along with the wood.

 

Question: How do you store cheese?

 

Answer: 

In order to answer your question, it would be helpful to know the type of cheese you smoked, hard, semi-hard, soft, or creamy as they require different means of storing, a simple container, vac-seal or waxing are the most common.

 

If you are storing hard or semi-hard cheese for a short period of time, cheese paper may be used. If storing hard or semi-hard cheese for longer periods you may vac-seal or wax. Be advised though, using cling wrap or vac-sealing can suffocate your cheese, not allowing it to age as it would in wax, also depending on the plastic used, you may find your cheese taking on a plastic taste.

 

If vac-sealing, don’t worry about moisture on your cheese. Mold is caused by oxygen reaching your cheese, not moisture. Cheese such as cheddar that has been aged for a number of years will naturally expel moisture within its packaging. You may find an example of that here.  http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/245739/2016-christmas-gift-cheese-aged-smoked-waxed

 

 I let my hard cheeses air dry before vac-sealing for cosmetic reasons as moisture can cause streaking on the surface of the cheese. I will let it set overnight if my intent is to wax. This will allow a thin skin on the surface, which to me, allows for better waxing as you don’t want to wax cold cheese.

 

Hopefully this helps in answering your questions.

 

Have fun and enjoy your cheese,

 

Tom

post #192 of 197

Excellent post Tom.

 

It pretty much sums up about all you need to know on how to properly smoke cheese, especially the part that so many people miss regarding keeping some distance between the source of smoke and the product being smoked.

 

Those that have the smoke source immediately adjacent to the product then say that, even though it tastes like the bottom of a well used ash tray , it's normal, and just wait a few weeks and it will be fine. The taste of creosote's offspring, soot, will mellow over time, but never fully dissipates.  

 

D

post #193 of 197

Outstanding tutorial, Thank you for posting this thread. Tried to give point to it but unable. 

post #194 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarbelly View Post
 

First - Thanks to Mr T for a great post on smoking cheese

 

Most of us who have been smoking cheese for a while let it rest in the fridge for a minimum of two weeks. I personally like 4-6 weeks. I have some that is 14 months old and Nepas just opened some that was aged 20 months.

 

Here is a link to the cheese section which has lots of posts on this subject 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/f/2166/cheese

 

 

If you want instant gratification try some fresh mozzarella - here is a link to some I have done 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/101771/smoked-mozzarella

Regarding letting the cheese rest after smoking, are you letting it rest in the fridge on a rack or is it being vacuum sealed/waxed/etc. prior to the resting period? 

post #195 of 197
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by seanysmokes View Post
 

Regarding letting the cheese rest after smoking, are you letting it rest in the fridge on a rack or is it being vacuum sealed/waxed/etc. prior to the resting period? 

 

Welcome to the forum and thank you for your question. The answer you are looking for can be found in the original thread or partially in post #191 above.

 

For a short answer, hard cheeses can rest and stored at room temperature, 70° or below, until dry of any possible moisture then sealed by whatever means you choose. Other cheeses such as medium or soft can be kept at 55° or below. Cream and cottage cheese should be kept at refrigerator temps.

 

T

post #196 of 197
Thread Starter 

Edited the thread to include the following.

 

Question: What temperature should cheese be prior to smoking?

 

Answer: It depends on how much smoke you want your cheese to take on. The cooler the cheese the more smoke it will take on in a time period, this is desired when smoking cream type cheese and helps in avoiding melting. If a more mild smoke is desired, allow the harder cheese to come to ambient temperature prior to smoking.

 

Bring it to ambient temperature in it's original packaging before cutting into desired blocks. This will avoid a skin from developing on the surface, and allow the smoke to better penetrate the cheese.

post #197 of 197

Absolutely Outstanding Tutorial/Pictorial!  :first: 

 

 

I too smoke cheeses frequently and have been for years. Much of what you posted are my methodologies of smoking cheese,

 

All of what you put up took much time and forethought-All of which was garnered from your years of practical experience.

 

Thank You much for sharing this wealth of experience and knowledge with all here on these Forums!:Looks-Great:

 

Best Regards,

 

Tony :beercheer:

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