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Brining question

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi - I'm going to brine some turkey legs to smoke tomorrow. I plan to use Tip's Slaughterhouse Brine. I am also going to smoke some bone-in chicken breasts tomorrow as well. Can I make the brine tonight and put the turkey legs in overnight, and then put the chicken breasts into the same brine with the turkey legs tomorrow morning for a couple of hours before I start smoking? Or should I make a fresh brine for the chicken tomorrow morning?

 

Thanks!

 

post #2 of 11

I would just make a little extra tonight while I'm making it and put it in the fridge so it will be cold and ready for the chicken in the morning.

post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by S2K9K View Post

I would just make a little extra tonight while I'm making it and put it in the fridge so it will be cold and ready for the chicken in the morning.

yeahthat.gif .... Also let me warn you NOT to dump the left over brine down your kitchen sink... been there, done that.. The salt in the brine will rust the strainer and the drain... Dump it down the toilet...
post #4 of 11

For a couple of hours?  I think you would be safe if the brine is kept cold.

 

But you already know the brine is not to be used again.

 

As for disposal.  If you have the water running, I doubt your sink or plumbing would suffer that much.

 

Good luck and good smoking.

post #5 of 11
Have you used that brine before?
That's quite a weak brine, only about 5.5 degrees if you're using salt that weighs 6 ounces per cup.
As a rule-of-thumb, poultry brines are in the 20 degree range.
You may want to consider brining longer.

Just a thought.
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingDogFarm View Post

Have you used that brine before?
That's quite a weak brine, only about 5.5 degrees if you're using salt that weighs 6 ounces per cup.
As a rule-of-thumb, poultry brines are in the 20 degree range.
You may want to consider brining longer.
Just a thought.


What determines the degree range? I have never heard of this before.

 

post #7 of 11
Hi S2K9K,
Here's a good run down on brines and brine strength.
The brine table shows the various degree brines.

http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/sausage-making/curing/making-brine

Martin
post #8 of 11

Thanks Martin, looks like a lot of good info there. I've got some studying to do.

 

Dave

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your great info, folks! I love this site. I'm going to skip the chicken breasts entirely and save them for Easter Sunday. That makes it easier.

 

I'm doing a trial run tomorrow on a tri tip roast because I want to do one on Sunday for Easter (along with a turkey breast.) I'll post pictures tomorrow.

 

post #10 of 11

Tip uses this brine in his business and he recommends brining overnite.  This recipe is tried and true  and has been very successfully used by lots of folks here. Follow the recipe and you will end up with a great end result.  I would separate the brine into two batches if possible. 

 

I would not be worried about the concentration. I personally have used this brine with great success 

post #11 of 11

I guess I should have added:

 

If the meat will be cooked immediatly?

 

With a proper brine that would be fine.

 

Having said that, I am speaking about a brine that is used for flavoring and moisturizing the meat.

 

If the brine is being used for curing the meat, that would be a totally different issue.

 

If in doubt, use separate brines.  If the brine was kept at a proper temp, I see no problem using a flavoring brine as long as the meat is handled as recommended.

 

Good luck and good smoking.

 

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