or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Preserving Food › Curing › Tenderquick to pink salt conversion
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tenderquick to pink salt conversion - Page 4

post #61 of 74

So if we know how much stuff is in stuff we have and we want to know how much of that stuff we want in the stuff we are cooking a little math will tell you how much stuff we need to add to the stuff we are making to have safe stuff?

 

I better just go take a shower and try to wake up. 

 

 

post #62 of 74

Exactly icon_eek.gif

post #63 of 74
Now we're getting somewhere!!!!!

Thanks folks!!!
post #64 of 74

No thank You.......ROTF.gif

post #65 of 74
FWIW....here is what our 'friends' at the almighty USDA have to say about cures containing both nitrate and nitrite. 22

'NITRITE AND NITRATE USED TOGETHER IN A SINGLE CURING METHOD

When nitrite and nitrate are used together in a single curing method, each one is calculated
independently and each one is permitted to be used up to the maximum individual limits listed in
Table II'

Table II
MAXIMUM INGOING NITRITE AND NITRATE LIMITS (IN PPM)
FOR MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS

191
post #66 of 74

I've been on this board long enough to know that 99% of the visitors to this site will not do the math.  They just want to know how much.  There may be a couple of dozen of us that can sit down and demonstrate how to determine the concentrations of cure in a product.  Let's be honest, it is kind of geeky.  To the people that are not interested in the math, You must use the cure used in the recipe you are using.

 

To the professionals, to the advanced hobbyist and to the geeks that are willing to learn about allowable concentrations of cure agents, to become comfortable with the math. to learn how much cure agent is in the cure mixes you are using then you may have the advantage of being able to substitute cure mixes.   But please be clear with the general membership that they need to know what they are doing.  As a general rule I do not recommend substituting cures.

 

We have an ongoing discussion about having a closed forum open only to the second group.  The professionals, the advanced hobbyist and the geeks among us.  This would be a place where we can have detailed discussions similar to this thread without having to be concerned that a newbie will misunderstand and make a mistake that could make them ill.  We are not there yet so please keep in mind that if someone that believe you are an "expert" reads your post, misinterprets it you hold a bit of responsibility.  I do not wish to be responsible for someones health so I will continue to take the safe easy way when posting in an open forum.

post #67 of 74
If we know that TQ is used at a rate of 1 level tablespoon per pound for cuts of meat, and 1/2 a level tablespoon (1-1/2 teaspoons) per pound with ground meats. Which anyone who uses TQ should know.
And we know that the nitrate and nitrite are within safes level in TQ when used in such a way, which they are, we don't need to use much, if any, math the use TQ in recipes as long as we know the weight of our meat.
That's the beauty of it.

And I agree, if someone isn't comfortable and confident in their understanding of cures and curing, please, only use the recipe as directed.
Edited by SausageBoy - 2/13/12 at 8:13am
post #68 of 74

Sausageboy

My comments are directed at all cure mixes.  Not just TQ.   There are many posts concerning special cure mixes made by companies for specific purposes.  People always post questions about using a cure mix that came with casings or sold as a  " fill in the blank"  ____________  cure mix  They want to know if they can use that cure mix in a recipe they have found in a book somewhere.

 

Now that I know the percentage of Nitrates in Morton's Tender Quick is so low as to be insignificant it should not be a health issue in short term cures.

post #69 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by alblancher View Post

Sausageboy

My comments are directed at all cure mixes.  Not just TQ.   There are many posts concerning special cure mixes made by companies for specific purposes.  People always post questions about using a cure mix that came with casings or sold as a  " fill in the blank"  ____________  cure mix  They want to know if they can use that cure mix in a recipe they have found in a book somewhere.

 

Now that I know the percentage of Nitrates in Morton's Tender Quick is so low as to be insignificant it should not be a health issue in short term cures.


I totally understand!!!!

That's why I said...

"And I agree, if someone isn't comfortable and confident in their understanding of cures and curing, please, only use the recipe as directed."


biggrin.gif
Edited by SausageBoy - 2/13/12 at 8:13am
post #70 of 74
But when you think about it, "Follow the recipe." or "You must use the cure used in the recipe you are using." and the like isn't the best and safest kind of advice.
That works okay if the recipe is accurate (no mistakes) and safe, but I run across questionable recipes and practices quite frequently.

The best advice may be......Because of potential safety issues, educate yourself and much as possible about cures and curing, making sure you understand it all enough to do it safely before you follow any recipe or do any curing! Double check all recipes for safety before proceeding.

In other words, please know what you are doing before curing.
Edited by SausageBoy - 2/14/12 at 10:02am
post #71 of 74

That's the big issue.

 

One of my local butchers doesn't sell curing salts during the summer months, because he had an issue with people doing curing and then hanging meat in the garage to cure where temperatures were in the 80's & 90's. Then they wondered why the meat went bad!!!!  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alblancher View Post

I've been on this board long enough to know that 99% of the visitors to this site will not do the math.  They just want to know how much.  There may be a couple of dozen of us that can sit down and demonstrate how to determine the concentrations of cure in a product.  Let's be honest, it is kind of geeky.  To the people that are not interested in the math, You must use the cure used in the recipe you are using.

 

To the professionals, to the advanced hobbyist and to the geeks that are willing to learn about allowable concentrations of cure agents, to become comfortable with the math. to learn how much cure agent is in the cure mixes you are using then you may have the advantage of being able to substitute cure mixes.   But please be clear with the general membership that they need to know what they are doing.  As a general rule I do not recommend substituting cures.

 

We have an ongoing discussion about having a closed forum open only to the second group.  The professionals, the advanced hobbyist and the geeks among us.  This would be a place where we can have detailed discussions similar to this thread without having to be concerned that a newbie will misunderstand and make a mistake that could make them ill.  We are not there yet so please keep in mind that if someone that believe you are an "expert" reads your post, misinterprets it you hold a bit of responsibility.  I do not wish to be responsible for someones health so I will continue to take the safe easy way when posting in an open forum.



 

post #72 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by SausageBoy View Post

But when you think about it, "Follow the recipe." or "You must use the cure used in the recipe you are using." and the like isn't the best and safest kind of advice.
That works okay if the recipe is accurate (no mistakes) and safe, but I run across questionable recipes and practices quite frequently.
The best advice may be......Because of potential safety issues, educate yourself and much as possible about cures and curing, making sure you understand it all enough to do it safely before you follow any recipe or do any curing! Double check all recipes for safety before proceeding.
In other words, please know what you are doing before curing.



This is ABSOLUTLY TRUE!...Great advice...241.png...Thanks...JJ

 

post #73 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by SausageBoy View Post


The best advice may be......Because of potential safety issues, educate yourself and much as possible about cures and curing, making sure you understand it all enough to do it safely before you follow any recipe or do any curing! Double check all recipes for safety before proceeding.
In other words, please know what you are doing before curing.

I agree 100%, I've seen recipes by recognized authors that are totally wrong, and having the knowledge to see the errors to me, just takes the fear factor out of curing..

If you're not sure about something post the question and somebody will chime it to help.

 

 Ya might have noticed we take this seriously and except for some trouble reading people across the net, I think we all agree on curing safety is a prime importance
 

 

I'm just wondering Is there a liability issue with posting copywrited recipes that are known to be dangerous as far a curing goes? I've emailed two authors on this and never received a response.

Or  would posting a link to the recipe and showing the issue here doing the math be a liability to the forum owners?

It wouldn't be my intent to discredit the person but to just save someone from some possible sickness.

 

 

post #74 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanMcG View Post

I'm just wondering Is there a liability issue with posting copywrited recipes that are known to be dangerous as far a curing goes? I've emailed two authors on this and never received a response.

Or  would posting a link to the recipe and showing the issue here doing the math be a liability to the forum owners?

It wouldn't be my intent to discredit the person but to just save someone from some possible sickness.

 

 


Good questions!
Just today I found a recipe on the website of a well respected "authority" and "expert" that's blatantly bad (twice the recommended safe level of nitrite!!!) icon_eek.gif

Which is another good lesson to be learned..."Don't assume that because someone is considered an 'expert', that they always know what they are talking about or that they are free from making mistakes!"
Always double check for safety!!
Educate yourself! You are responsible for you!
Edited by SausageBoy - 2/14/12 at 5:18pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Curing
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Preserving Food › Curing › Tenderquick to pink salt conversion