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Why are my ribs not fall off the bone - Page 2

post #21 of 30

Hello all,

 

I am new to smoking and had some questions....I tried 2 racks of baby back ribs for the first time and I used the 2-2-1 method and they turned out tough! Flavor great but not at all fall off the bone....I have an electric smoker and had my heat set at 225 smoked for the first 2 hours and the last hour. I used a bit of beer when I wrapped them in foil. any help would be great because I had to use a knife to get my meat off the bone.

post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by new smoker 55 View Post

Hello all,

I am new to smoking and had some questions....I tried 2 racks of baby back ribs for the first time and I used the 2-2-1 method and they turned out tough! Flavor great but not at all fall off the bone....I have an electric smoker and had my heat set at 225 smoked for the first 2 hours and the last hour. I used a bit of beer when I wrapped them in foil. any help would be great because I had to use a knife to get my meat off the bone.

new smoker, if your ribs turned out tough they were likely undercooked..... Keep in mind that the 2-2-1 method is only a guideline.... Not all bb ribs will be done exactly at the 2-2-1..... Ya will likely have to kinda tinker with the times til ya get the results your lookin for, but again these methods like the 2-2-1 are just a guideline.... That's important to remember.... Try a toothpick to see if they are tender, watch the end of the ribs as well, because as ribs cook the meat at the end of the bones will shrink or pull back.... A lot of folks will do the bend test as well, however for fall off the bone ribs ya will not want to use this method ! For fall off the bone, ya may have to foil a little longer !

Now to the smoker, what kind of smoker & are ya reading the temp with the built in or stock therm. ? Most stock therms are inaccurate..... Or do ya have another therm. you are using ? A lot of folks on this site, myself included have purchased a Maverick ET-732 dual probe therm. Dual probe meaning one probe for meat IT & one probe for smoker temp ! This info hopefully will help to get ya the results your lookin for next time !
Edited by WaterinHoleBrew - 6/13/14 at 9:47am
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdboatbum View Post


Bingo. Thanks for answering the OP's question. Whether you foil or not, time is the most important ingredient in getting tender ribs. Foiling for 2 hours hastens the process, but it CAN take it too far resulting in ribs that are in my opinion too tender. I happen to like a little less time in foil for a bit more firmness to my ribs. But that's me. I'd suggest the OP (if he's still around) check his ribs using the "bend test". A rack of ribs, when lifted in the middle with a pair of tongs, will bend in varying degrees depending on how far along they are in the tenderizing process. If they fold almost in half, you're probably there. Temp checking on ribs is difficult as there are bones, thin meat and connective tissue all occupying a very small area.

Here in Utah, we prefer our ribs to be FOTB. If they don't, then they are too tough and not enjoyable. I always cook mine to be FOTB, and always have friends putting in orders each time I smoke ribs.
post #24 of 30

I usually do 2-2-1 for babybacks. However, I have learned with my setup that it is highly dependent on thickness and fat content. if the ribs are more fatty I have to kick the temps up a bit, especially in the last hour to render out a lot of the fat. my last set were really thick and had a lot of fat, so it went more like 2-2-2 than 2-2-1. I also go for a slight amount of tug instead of fall off the bone (still tender, just not falling apart), so I usually don't add liquid to the foil and sometimes do it a bit shorter than two hours for the foiled portion.

post #25 of 30
Exactly. It drives me nuts when people want "fall of the bone" ribs. When the bone is completely void of meat, your ribs are over cooked. Your initial bite will go to the bone, but the rest will stay.
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyBoysBBQ View Post

Exactly. It drives me nuts when people want "fall of the bone" ribs. When the bone is completely void of meat, your ribs are over cooked. Your initial bite will go to the bone, but the rest will stay.

You shouldn't let it upset you. Most people know Med/Rare Beef is tasty and Juicy but there are still a lot of folks that insist on Well Done Steaks! Are they Wrong? Dad spent 50 years trying to convince Mom that Well Done destoyed the flavor and texture of Beef...

 

Many folks that expect Fall of the Bone Ribs, just think that is the way they are supposed to be. It is the National Chain Restaurant's fault, among others. A place like Chili's or Outback and others, have the Ribs cooked, some Steam Smoked, wrapped and refrigerated. When an order comes in, the already very well done Ribs hit the Grill, Broiler or very hot Oven to be reheated and sauced to death. Additionally, a large percentage of well known Northern and Southern BBQ Places, do such high volume of Ribs, that they have no choice  but to Smoke, Foil and Hold their ribs at 150°F. The Collagen connective tissue continues to breakdown as long as the ribs are held hot. There is no way, with those styles of Moist cooking or long term holding, you can expect or even get Competition Bite Through Ribs.  

 

Many years ago, I and a group of Chef's, judged a huge Rib Cookoff in Central PA. This annual event had several local Teams, attracted some Pitmasters from all over the country and had some area Chain restaurants participate as well. The Judges Choice was a guy that smoked up some great, bite through, Memphis Style Dry Ribs...The Peoples Choice award went to a National Chain Restaurant...th_dunno-1[1].gif 

 

I just saw an episode of Man, Fire, Food, where a popular southern Q joint was making BIG $$$ with their Famous, Secret Recipe, " Boneless " Racks of Ribs...You could see that the slabs of Baby Back Ribs were just cooked to the point that the bones could be pulled out. The host used a knife so cut the meat up but the meat was so fall apart that a fork was all that was needed...JJ

post #27 of 30

Subbing to this thread.

post #28 of 30

Some people like fall off the bone ribs others don't that doesn't make either wrong. People need to figure out just because they do something a certain way doesn't mean that's the only way or even the right way for everybody. It boils down to personal tastes

post #29 of 30

My wife likes it chewy.  I love it FOTB.  We both cant be happy so Im trying to find a middle ground!

post #30 of 30

another bad thing of fall-off-the-bone is that its hard to get good cuts if you are in a cook-off for presentation purposes.

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