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post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hello all


This is my first post, and this past weekend marked my first attempt at smoking a pork shoulder on a charcoal grill. It seems pretty interesting and rewarding so, i thought i would take a stab at it.


The problem is...she came out tough! I just have your standard 22.5 webber kettle. Since it was my first time, i just did a little guy at 4.5 lbs. I had it on there for 6.5 hrs. By the time i took it off, the internal temp was 180, so i thought she was done.


Again, the taste was there but boy was she tough! I'm assuming i took it off too early? Also, since this was my virgin voyage at this, i had a tough time getting a constant temp. It was generally around 240-250, but did tend to fluctuate between 200-300 between the coals ending and adding more charcoal.


I'm like like anything, its gonna take some practice to get my skills, and those temps regulated, but any help from all of you seasoned vets out there would be much appreciated as well!




post #2 of 10


This site has tons of info.
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post #3 of 10


Welcome to SMF Pat! Glad to have you with us!


Would you do us a favor & update your profile info to include your location. Then go over to the roll call section & introduce yourself so we all can give you a proper SMF welcome. Thank-you.

post #4 of 10

Welcome Pat!


for the tenderness, get her up to about 200-205 before pulling her from the heat, then let her rest for about 30-45 minutes so that the juices redistribute through the rest of the meat. Then pull and eat!


Some of us like to foil after the internal temp of the meat is at about 165. By doing this, it retains the moisture. Purists dont agree with this method though!


Your temperature regulation will greatly depend on your usage of the vents. The wider open the vent is, the hotter it will likely get in there. The more closed the vent is, the less air will get in there to feed the the coals. When adding the coals, if you have a way to get them already going, like in a chimney starter, then it might help you regulate the heat better when adding them to the existing fire and coals.


Just like anything, it takes practice and patience! Don't get discouraged.. This forum is a great place to learn more and get tips and ideas.

Good luck to you!


Butts Up!



post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thnx for the reply....


I have deffinately been using a chimney to get them going before i toss them in. But, i think i may have been adding too much? I put a full chimney in every 1hr 20-30 mins? and...not sure if i let them ash over enough, so tossing them in piping hot may have just raised the temp too much for those initial 20 mins or so. I'll admit...it was snowing out, i was freezing, and may have got a little impatient and just wanted to get them in there, then back inside...hahaha


Thnx for the help

post #6 of 10


First off welcome to SMF there Phatz. Now that temp of 200°-205° i really that important to. Now you can pull a butt off at 195° for slicing and it's tougher then if you pull it at 205° and it just falls apart. So those small little details do make a big difference.

post #7 of 10


post #8 of 10

you have to be the judge of when you are going to refuel your fire.

That is the part that will take time to learn and get used too. Each smoker is going to be a little different, and each person is going to have their own preference.


The secret ingredient to any good BBQ is patience.

post #9 of 10


post #10 of 10

Welcome to SMF, Pat. There's plenty of good imfo on here. All you need to do is search for it and ask questions.

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