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Beef Brisket and Picnic Pork Shoulder vs New Masterbuilt Electric Smoker

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

So my fiance asked "Hey what do you want for Christmas?" My first thought was 1 million dollars but I didn't want her to rob a bank for me. The only thing that came to mind was I need another smoker something easier to deal with over charcoal vertical I have. I had been watching the forums and looking at reviews about electric smokes so I pointed her at a 30' MES. We picked up last night and of course I had to take my new toy out for a spin. So I grabbed a brisket and a picnic shoulder.

 

I seasoned and put the meat on last night around 1 am est. These pictures are taken as of 10 am

 

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The only thing that would be perfect would be to have 2 meat rakes ;)

post #2 of 15

I asked my Wife about getting Meat Rakes, she said I already have a set that came with opposable thumbs!....Wise A$$! wife.gif...JJ

post #3 of 15

Now that's the way to break in a smoker!

 

Awesome!

 

Forget the meat rakes, just get some good gloves!

post #4 of 15

Great 1st Smoke!

Suggestion: Wrap the water pan and lower drip in foil.  You'll appreciate it at clean up time! icon_biggrin.gif

 

Todd

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

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post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJohnson View Post

Great 1st Smoke!

Suggestion: Wrap the water pan and lower drip in foil.  You'll appreciate it at clean up time! icon_biggrin.gif

 

Todd



Thank you for the suggestion I will do that after this smoke. I noticed to my drippings are going down the front of the unit too so I'm going to have to look at it when it cools off.

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmiSmoking View Post



Thank you for the suggestion I will do that after this smoke. I noticed to my drippings are going down the front of the unit too so I'm going to have to look at it when it cools off.



yeah I used to wrap everything too, but then I just decided to use those disposable aluminum pans, doesn't affect the smoke flavor at all, plus keeps your briskets and shoulders in s bit of it's drippings

post #7 of 15

Congrats on the new smoker.  Tell the misses she did good!

post #8 of 15

 Great way to break in your new smoker...Looks like some Awesome Que from heredrool.gif

post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

Well the shoulder turned out REALLY GOOD. Without a finishing sauce it was absolutely wonderful. I didn't think I was going to get a bark using a electric smoker but it had a wonderful crisp crunch. It was perfect. I put in my finishing sauce and I thought I was having a dream drool.gif

 

My brisket on the other hand failed big time. I am used to a charcoal/wood fuel and low heat long cook time. I thought well 250 for 10 hours should be great. It won't hurt anything. When I checked the temps on the brisket it read 200+ degrees. Foiled, Wrapped and put both pieces in the cooler. We left for about 2 hours came back and the nightmare began. The bottom of one was so burnt, crispy and the meat was stringy. Cutting through it with the knife was a job in it's own. The other piece thankful was ok.

 

Since it's controlled like a oven maybe I have to adjust the heat and time. Any ideas on what my temp should be set at as well as internal temp? Also I have found success at getting the meat to about 170 or 180 on charcoal/wood fuel is that the same for electric?

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmiSmoking View Post

Well the shoulder turned out REALLY GOOD. Without a finishing sauce it was absolutely wonderful. I didn't think I was going to get a bark using a electric smoker but it had a wonderful crisp crunch. It was perfect. I put in my finishing sauce and I thought I was having a dream drool.gif

 

My brisket on the other hand failed big time. I am used to a charcoal/wood fuel and low heat long cook time. I thought well 250 for 10 hours should be great. It won't hurt anything. When I checked the temps on the brisket it read 200+ degrees. Foiled, Wrapped and put both pieces in the cooler. We left for about 2 hours came back and the nightmare began. The bottom of one was so burnt, crispy and the meat was stringy. Cutting through it with the knife was a job in it's own. The other piece thankful was ok.

 

Since it's controlled like a oven maybe I have to adjust the heat and time. Any ideas on what my temp should be set at as well as internal temp? Also I have found success at getting the meat to about 170 or 180 on charcoal/wood fuel is that the same for electric?

 

JMHO, but 250 is too high temp for brisket. when I do brisket I'm 200-225 no higher I try and maintain 215. Low and slow only way to do brisket.

Another thought here your stat could be off did you have a thermometer other then stock to check temp of cooker.? I'm thinking your temp may have been higher.


 

post #11 of 15

I think you simply wrapped the brisket to late.  I tend to wrap mine earlier, when it starts to dry out, about 160 - 170.  Let it get up to 200 or so wrapped in foil and then back on the smoker without the foil to crisp up the bark.  They rest wrapped in towels in an ice chest for a couple of hours before serving. 

 

 A lot of people have problems with dry brisket but I'm not aware of anyone using different temps in an electric.     Remember burning wood releases moisture into the smoke chamber, if you are burning watts where is that moisture coming from if you don't add it?

 

I'm strickly a wood burner so what I just said about electric may be 100 percent wrong!  If it is someone will correct me.  biggrin.gif

post #12 of 15

that looks good

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprky View Post

 

JMHO, but 250 is too high temp for brisket. when I do brisket I'm 200-225 no higher I try and maintain 215. Low and slow only way to do brisket.

Another thought here your stat could be off did you have a thermometer other then stock to check temp of cooker.? I'm thinking your temp may have been higher.


 

I need to get another measurement on the temp and see if that was the problem but lowering it might help too. Thank you for the suggestion I'm going to try that. Yes I just went with the stock which is never a good idea. But I was in a rush to start smoking :D This weekend I'm doing to do a turkey breast more than likely set it 200 and give it 4 to 6 hours
 

 

post #14 of 15

I usually use three internal thermometers and average out the temperature.  I guess there is a way to calibrate the 3rd party therms but I haven't taken the time to read up on it.

 

You might also try rotating the racks midway through the smoke.  How was the smoke, btw? 

 

As far as the rakes, I've got both rakes and gloves.  I would much rather use my gloves.  They were slick as ice to begin with but now I'm able to get a little traction in getting them off.  I took a rasp and did a few files on the top of the fingers to give me a rough texture to grab hold of.  Otherwise, they were a pain to get off when new.  I've got big hands.

 

My first pictures of the first smoking looked great in the brand new cabinet also.  Now the cabinet is nicely seasoned and not as pretty.  Anyone have a good suggestion for cleaning the inside of one of these units?  For now I'm using 401 on industrial cloth towels (like you get at Sam's Club), then I spray just water on clean cloth towels and try to wipe off any cleaner.  The towels will never look clean again, don't care how many washings.

post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redclaymud View Post

I usually use three internal thermometers and average out the temperature.  I guess there is a way to calibrate the 3rd party therms but I haven't taken the time to read up on it.

 

You might also try rotating the racks midway through the smoke.  How was the smoke, btw? 

 

As far as the rakes, I've got both rakes and gloves.  I would much rather use my gloves.  They were slick as ice to begin with but now I'm able to get a little traction in getting them off.  I took a rasp and did a few files on the top of the fingers to give me a rough texture to grab hold of.  Otherwise, they were a pain to get off when new.  I've got big hands.

 

My first pictures of the first smoking looked great in the brand new cabinet also.  Now the cabinet is nicely seasoned and not as pretty.  Anyone have a good suggestion for cleaning the inside of one of these units?  For now I'm using 401 on industrial cloth towels (like you get at Sam's Club), then I spray just water on clean cloth towels and try to wipe off any cleaner.  The towels will never look clean again, don't care how many washings.

The shoulder can out perfect! 1 of the 2 brisket halves was fine and couldn't have been any better. The other one was tough enough to be used as a leather belt. We have plans to mix it in with some split pea's and other soups. But yes it was over cooked to the max. I wasn't happy enough with the product to take pictures.

 

Money is alittle tight this week but next weekend I should have 2 shoulders on for a party at work and I'll just watch it and enjoy this rather warmer than normal weather.

 

I was thinking I might only clean the cabinet once every  2 or 3 smokes. But I would assume heating it up with a pan of water only on the inside would create steam and help to loosen that cooked up funk. A soft (not plastic but not wool) brush with handle might handle it well after it cools some? I guess you could go easy and use small amounts of oven cleaner spray...maybe to clean.

 

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