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Yard bird on a Brinkmann SnG

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

It's been awhile since I've done a yard bird and since I just got a Brinkmann SnG seasoned I figured it was a good time to do one. The Brinkmann actually runs a much more consistent temp than my horizontal sfb which I am very pleased with. And I only had to do one mod(3 bolts in the fire pan and a small grill grate to raise the coals a bit) So here's how I got started.


Picked up a 7lb bird at Meijer.


yard bird 005.jpg


yard bird 003.jpg


The bird went into the brine on Tuesday night. I used the Slaughter House brine found on SMF. I brought 4 cups of water and all ingredients to a boil to melt all salts and sugars. Then added 1 gallon of ice water.


yard bird 001.jpg


yard bird 002.jpg


Now here is where my plans got changed. I was going to throw the bird on Wednesday night. But, my wife and I ended going to our daughter's basketball game to watch her cheer and then got invited to my sister in laws house. So, needless to say we didn't get home till 10:30 Wednesday night so smoking a bird that late didn't sound so fun. So plans got put on hold and the bird swam for a little longer than planned. That made me nervous but after doing some research on here I found it was fine to let it soak a day longer. All in all the bird soaked for almost 48 hours before hitting the smoker.


For fuel I used 5 chunks of applewood mixed in with approx 8 lbs of Kingsford Hickory charcoal. I used a large baked bean can with top and bottom removed placed in the middle of the charcoal pan and placed 20 briquettes in the can once they were fully ashed over.


yard bird 006.jpg


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Thursday night after getting home from Thanksgiving at my brother's house I fired up the chimney at 5:45pm and got the bird rinsed. While the coals were getting hot I made a mixture of 1/4 cup butter 1 tsp garlic powder and 1 tsp cajun seasoning and rubbed that under the skin. Then did a light coat of cajun seasoning on the outside of the bird. 


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yard bird 009.jpg


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At 6:00pm coals were hot and were put in the bean can. I then removed the bean can and added the water pan with 1 onion halved and 2 tbs of garlic powder. Let smoker get to temp. The bird went on at 6:30 pm when SnG temp had reached 230*. Temps did spike after around an hour to 275* but then settled back in to 250*. I only added approx. 10 briquettes after 3 hours but other than that it burned steady once settled for 5 hours. I also added 1 gallon of water to the water pan at 2 hours and 4 hours.


Here is the bird probed at 4 hours in. Internal temp was at 155*


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I pulled the bird at 5 hours when internal temp had reached 170*. Then wrapped in foil and put in the fridge for Friday nights dinner. I apologize but I did not get any pics of it sliced and plated. I can however say that it was a very tasty dinner.


yard bird 015.jpg.

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Well thanks for stopping by and having a gander! I hope all of you had a Happy Thanksgiving!



post #2 of 16

That looks like a beauty Jake!

post #3 of 16

Nice bird Jacob


post #4 of 16

Nice bird and thanks for the Q-view !

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys!

post #6 of 16

hi, i'm thinking of getting one of these cheap brinkmanns.  i would like to smoke a small turkey for christmas.  i've never actually used a "real smoker" grill but i've used grills and done low-fire indirect cooking for ribs and chicken.  what is different about making the fire in a smoker grill?  you put the charcoal in a can and then took the can out?  to start the fire initially like some people use a chimney for?  (i don't do that).  i've read the reviews about these brinkmanns that say you need to either put holes in the charcoal pan or put the charcoal in a grill wok. i have a grill wok.  i won't be drilling any holes.  the reviews also say that the temperature gauge is wrong.  i have my own meat thermometer but that means i'll have to open the grill too much to check it?  thanks for your tips.

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 



There is really no difference other than when you are lighting a fire for a long smoke you want to use the minion method. I use a charcoal chimney to start the 20 briquettes i put in that can. By building your unlit coals around the can and putting your hot coals in the middle you are allowing the fire to burn for a longer period of time (search minion method). The can does get removed once the hot coals are added. I would suggest you get a charcoal chimney.


You don't need to drill holes or run bolts threw. If you can find a small grill grate like the ones used in a weber smokey joe then that will raise the coals off the bottom of the charcoal pan enough to allow enough air flow to your fire to keep it from getting choked out.


As far as the therm that is on the SnG it is garbage. You cannot gauge ur temp from something that reads "warm, ideal, hot". I use a digital probe therm pushed through a potato to gauge my surface level cooking temps. This allows you to gauge the temp without opening the smoker. Then I use either the meat therm you see in this thread or another digital probe therm that I have as well to read the internal temp of the meat. So go check out digital probe therms at wal mart. they usually run like 10 to 15 bucks.


Hope this helps.





post #8 of 16

ahhh, thanks!  i didnt know the real reason for the chimney. i thought people just used them to start the fire easier.  so a grate that either has its own "legs" or stick something in there to hold the charcoal off the bottom.  i don't know exactly how big i'd need yet, but i can probably find something like that.  thanks!

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 

No problem man!

post #10 of 16




points.gifJake,  good JOB!!  I agree that the thermo being replaced would be a good idea.  Up to you. Enjoy.

post #11 of 16

ok i plead ignorance.  digital therm probe on a potato?  you set it on the outside of the top of the grill, so if the potato is warm/hot/cold then you use that as your estimate of internal temp? 

post #12 of 16
very nice bird my friend! love to see such great results and I'm sure that beauty went quick
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 



Look at the pic above of the bird 4 hours in. To the left you will see the digital probe therm through the half potato. A digital Probe therm is a therm that has a probe on a cord that plugs into a digital therm that reads the temp in the smoker or the internal temp of the meat. The digital part stays on the outside of either the smoker or oven when you use.



post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks again guys!

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 

You can also search an adventure with a leg of lamb and see pics 8 and 10 to see what I am talking about.

post #16 of 16

oooh i looked up your leg of lamb adventure and i'm hungry!  i love garlic:)  i plan to eventually roast some on the grill like someone posted. 


well i got the brinkmann, have only done the 'curing' that it said do. i threw in some sweet potatoes in foil to bake since i didn't really smell anything funny.  i have a little better idea that i'm going to need to add more charcoal, etc.  now i'm trying to figure out the thermometer thing. i saw your pics 8, 10!  great!!  the manual for brinkmann says that the hood isn't designed to fit snugly, so does that mean that there should be room enough for the probe thermometer without propping up the hood (too much)?  Sorry, but mostly I've just stuck a meat thermometer in things to check temp.  and eyeball the grill food but it's not consistently like i want it. 


oh, i had the handy guy at home depot just drill me some holes in that charcoal pan:)  it was dark tonight when i was trying to work with it, so hopefully tomorrow it will be lighter when i at least start working on my now marinating ribs:)

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