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How many Turkey soups are in progress - Page 2

post #21 of 25

Well living in roux country I will tell you Emans Gumbo recipe is spot on.  We do a roux between blond and dark.  You can find it in the articles section of SMF.  I have not done but saw a roux technique using the oven instead of stove top.  Safer it seems but slower.

post #22 of 25

Well, I never knew what I make, is called "gumbo". I'm a seat-of-the-pants cook and I have been concocting what you call gumbo for years. I just found that out now when I googled it.

 

I use the drippings that go into a pan under the bird with celery, onion, carrots and peppers in a bath of cider/water that steams the bird. Then when the bones are boiled, the two stocks are blended.

 

My wife calls what I make with the turkey-afters, a "thick stew-soup".  One thing I always have in it, are the wild leek bulbs and leaves, which we dig in the woodlot after the snow goes out late April. Southerners call them, "ramps".

 

Locals here are amazed that we fry the leaves like crisp onions. They've been digging leeks in families here for 200 years and always tossed the leaves, only eating the bulb i.e. pickled or raw. None of them ever fried the leaves. We do that and also have them boiled or fried.  We do all of it, all ways. We're not bound by local tradition.  They are hard-rock Scots that arrived here during the 1820's. My ramp pulling Scots landed in S.C in 1710 and some trickled north. Do any of you fry the leaves?

 

Word of caution. After you eat them, especially fried tops, don't go near anyone that you like.  On Lodge night, I am the only person sitting on that side of the Lodge room, when the call goes out, "Rich has been into the leeks".  

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Venture View Post

Excellent point, Scooper.  The darker roux is tricky if too much heat is added.  Also, the dark roux, like browned flour will have less thickening power.

 

Good luck and good smoking.

 

Thanks, Venture.  You explained it better than I did.  I have not made it in years.  And when I did it was in 10 - 15 gallon pots for restaurant service.  I was going on memory about the oil coming out. 

 

I usually made chicken and sausage gumbo, obviously subbing the seafood stock with chicken stock.

post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShooterRick View Post

Well living in roux country I will tell you Emans Gumbo recipe is spot on.  We do a roux between blond and dark.  You can find it in the articles section of SMF.  I have not done but saw a roux technique using the oven instead of stove top.  Safer it seems but slower.


Definitely safer!  I will look up eman's gumbo.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Kielbasa Kid View Post

Well, I never knew what I make, is called "gumbo". I'm a seat-of-the-pants cook and I have been concocting what you call gumbo for years. I just found that out now when I googled it.

 

I use the drippings that go into a pan under the bird with celery, onion, carrots and peppers in a bath of cider/water that steams the bird. Then when the bones are boiled, the two stocks are blended.

 

My wife calls what I make with the turkey-afters, a "thick stew-soup".  One thing I always have in it, are the wild leek bulbs and leaves, which we dig in the woodlot after the snow goes out late April. Southerners call them, "ramps".

 

Locals here are amazed that we fry the leaves like crisp onions. They've been digging leeks in families here for 200 years and always tossed the leaves, only eating the bulb i.e. pickled or raw. None of them ever fried the leaves. We do that and also have them boiled or fried.  We do all of it, all ways. We're not bound by local tradition.  They are hard-rock Scots that arrived here during the 1820's. My ramp pulling Scots landed in S.C in 1710 and some trickled north. Do any of you fry the leaves?

 

Word of caution. After you eat them, especially fried tops, don't go near anyone that you like.  On Lodge night, I am the only person sitting on that side of the Lodge room, when the call goes out, "Rich has been into the leeks".  


That there's a good story! 

 

I have never fried the leek leaves, but now I want to.

 

post #25 of 25

in some ways the thanksgiving leftovers turned out better than the meal itself. here's what i did:

 

i took the turkey carcass and boiled it for a couple of hours, then removed and cut up the meat, defatted and reduced the broth down by half. then took the celery (including those wonderful, aromatic and verdant leaves), carrots, onions and garlic that we didn't use yesterday and chopped them all up. put them in the broth with a little salt and pepper for about half an hour. then cut up leftover turkey meat and added it to the broth along with the meat removed from the skeleton and the leftover gravy for about 10 minutes. finally, took the leftover mashed potatoes, added a little flour and egg and made noodles/dumplings similar to gnocchi or halusky - tossed them into the simmering mixture for about 10 or 15 minutes.

 

the result? a great home-made turkey soup, almost entirely from leftovers. easy as using a pre-made mix, but a million times better-tasting.

 

turkeysoup.jpg
 
served with a few leftover dinner rolls and enjoyed a complete leftover meal that was as good as anything you would find in a restaurant.
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