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The Brisket Journey Continues...

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I smoked my third brisket yesterday and expected it to be somewhat routine- so there are no pictures.

Used a lean 5lb Costco flat that had about 1/8" of fat still left on it. Thoroughly injected and rubbed the night before, then rubbed again before hitting the WSM. I wanted to experiment- so this is the first time I injected, would cook fat side down, and would not foil; expected a cooking time 1.5 hr/lb. Started at 10:30am with cherry and pecan...

(time- WSM, brisket)

10:30- start, 33
11:30- 230, 123
12:30- 224, 152
1:30- 242, 159
2:30- 238, 163
3:30- 235, 163
4:30- 230, 162
5:30- 226, 160
6:30- 229, 159 (7pm raised WSM temp to 250)
7:30- 252, 174
8:30- 248, 171
9:30- 256, 179
10:00- 251, 188 (took off)

I did not expect such a bad stall on a small piece of meat. When it came off it looked like flat coal but worse it was dry to the touch and inside. It had a thud like a good piece of freshly baked bread. The thinner parts were dry however the brisket was very uneven and the thicker parts did have some visible moisture. The thicker parts tasted good with a little finishing sauce, texture was slightly tough.

What I don't understand:

1. Does injecting increase the stall? I've cooked a 18lb packer before and have never had a stall (maybe a two stage stall) this bad before.

2. Why didn't injecting add moisture to the brisket or was it lost?

3. Are these results typical when you don't foil?

4. Why do bbq joints on tv who cook briskets without foiling have briskets with juices flowing off of them?

post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision View Post

I smoked my third brisket yesterday and expected it to be somewhat routine- so there are no pictures.

Used a lean 5lb Costco flat that had about 1/8" of fat still left on it. Thoroughly injected and rubbed the night before, then rubbed again before hitting the WSM. I wanted to experiment- so this is the first time I injected, would cook fat side down, and would not foil; expected a cooking time 1.5 hr/lb. Started at 10:30am with cherry and pecan...

(time- WSM, brisket)

10:30- start, 33
11:30- 230, 123
12:30- 224, 152
1:30- 242, 159
2:30- 238, 163
3:30- 235, 163
4:30- 230, 162
5:30- 226, 160
6:30- 229, 159 (7pm raised WSM temp to 250)
7:30- 252, 174
8:30- 248, 171
9:30- 256, 179
10:00- 251, 188 (took off)

I did not expect such a bad stall on a small piece of meat. When it came off it looked like flat coal but worse it was dry to the touch and inside. It had a thud like a good piece of freshly baked bread. The thinner parts were dry however the brisket was very uneven and the thicker parts did have some visible moisture. The thicker parts tasted good with a little finishing sauce, texture was slightly tough.

What I don't understand:

1. Does injecting increase the stall? No. I've cooked a 18lb packer before and have never had a stall (maybe a two stage stall) this bad before. I've had them stall for 6 to 7 hours, I think one mistake you made was kicking up the temp. You need a lot of patience when you smoke brisket.

2. Why didn't injecting add moisture to the brisket or was it lost? The next mistake I think you made was smoking it fat side down. The reason some guys do that is to protect the bottom of the meat from temp flare ups. On a WSM if you put the brisket on the bottom rack just above the water pan it is protected & with the fat side up it will stay juicier. Personally I trim most of the fat off & put the fat on the top rack so it drips on the brisket & keeps it moist. Also injecting will add moisture to the meat.

3. Are these results typical when you don't foil? No

4. Why do bbq joints on tv who cook briskets without foiling have briskets with juices flowing off of them? They know how to cook them low & slow! Look at some of the brisket threads on here & see how tender & juicy these guys get them without foil.



 

 

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:1. Does injecting increase the stall? No. I've cooked a 18lb packer before and have never had a stall (maybe a two stage stall) this bad before. I've had them stall for 6 to 7 hours, I think one mistake you made was kicking up the temp. You need a lot of patience when you smoke brisket.
 
Have you had a one in the 5lb range stall that long?

2. Why didn't injecting add moisture to the brisket or was it lost? The next mistake I think you made was smoking it fat side down. The reason some guys do that is to protect the bottom of the meat from temp flare ups. On a WSM if you put the brisket on the bottom rack just above the water pan it is protected & with the fat side up it will stay juicier. Personally I trim most of the fat off & put the fat on the top rack so it drips on the brisket & keeps it moist. Also injecting will add moisture to the meat.
 
Do you have any pictures of this Al?


3. Are these results typical when you don't foil? No
 
Good to know.

4. Why do bbq joints on tv who cook briskets without foiling have briskets with juices flowing off of them? They know how to cook them low & slow! Look at some of the brisket threads on here & see how tender & juicy these guys get them without foil.
 
I'll keep looking...thanks.


 

post #4 of 13
post #5 of 13

icon_cool.gif

First off meat does what meat wants to. If it want to stall it will. My first question for you is what kind of smoker. I almost don't want to say this for fear of giving myself a stall. I have been smoking briskets for years now and I have never had a stall. SSShhhhhh I didn't say that.OK! Now really don't think that injecting your meat give it any reason to stall. Next I always smoke my brisket fat side up so that the fat will stay on the meat as it melts and aids in keeping the meat moist. I also don't trim my briskets maybe alittle on the hard crust fat cap on the thick side or point side up. well as far as TV cook they don't have to eat the meat. Most of the time they are just staging the meat and not worried about how it comes out. Now like a BBQ restaurant they have to keep the meat hot and try to keep it moist fr nobody really likes a dried out piece of meat do they. That's why there is always a bunch of sauce on the meat when you get it. I have always foiled and will continue to foil as long as I smoke briskets. Mine come out great and I don't want to change anything for fear of one not coming out the way I want it too. I hope that has heled you and ifyou have any other questions just let me know. I'm here alot more now so PM me if you need.

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post

Read this it will clear a lot up on Stall...JJ

 

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/craig-goldwyn/physicist-cracks-bbq-mystery_b_987719.html

 


 

Thanks. That article is why I wondered if the injection increased the stall time.

 

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mballi3011 View Post

icon_cool.gif

First off meat does what meat wants to. If it want to stall it will. My first question for you is what kind of smoker. I almost don't want to say this for fear of giving myself a stall. I have been smoking briskets for years now and I have never had a stall. SSShhhhhh I didn't say that.OK! Now really don't think that injecting your meat give it any reason to stall. Next I always smoke my brisket fat side up so that the fat will stay on the meat as it melts and aids in keeping the meat moist. I also don't trim my briskets maybe alittle on the hard crust fat cap on the thick side or point side up. well as far as TV cook they don't have to eat the meat. Most of the time they are just staging the meat and not worried about how it comes out. Now like a BBQ restaurant they have to keep the meat hot and try to keep it moist fr nobody really likes a dried out piece of meat do they. That's why there is always a bunch of sauce on the meat when you get it. I have always foiled and will continue to foil as long as I smoke briskets. Mine come out great and I don't want to change anything for fear of one not coming out the way I want it too. I hope that has heled you and ifyou have any other questions just let me know. I'm here alot more now so PM me if you need.



When do you usually foil?

post #8 of 13

Yes I've had them stall when they're that small. Every piece of meat is different. Mark has never had one stall, I've never had one that didn't stall. Some longer than others, but always a stall of a couple of hours or so and in some cases 4 to 5 hours. Here's a link to a brisket I did using the trimmed fat on the top rack.

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/105041/weekend-brisket-burnt-ends-qview-galore

 

 

 

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks Al, everyone. I'm thinking of a high heat brisket this weekend...

post #10 of 13

Let us know how it turns out.

post #11 of 13

Equipment and experience are only 2/3 of the equation. The meat itself makes a difference too IMHO. If none of the above suggestions help, try getting a brisket from a different store and see what happens. I know the first few briskets I did turned out dry and oddly enough were from Costco as well. I tried a number of different methods with similar results although injecting did help at the time but I no longer do that. Don't give up, you'll get there.

 

post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 

Finally pulled it off. Not perfect but a major advancement.

I may never smoker a brisket below 300 again. Did a high heat smoke on a WSM with clay saucer. 5lb flat. Injected with a great beef broth. Oakridge rub.

 

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Smoked at 325. It was slightly breezy and at these temps the WSM was uncharacteristically sensitive. Very sensitive. Like a woman who...ahh never mind. Finally got it dialed in but it was towards the end of the smoke. Went heavy on the smoke...TBS be dammed since there was less than a two hours window to get that flavor in. Hickory and heavy on the cherry.

 

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(time- brisket/WSM)

10:40- 33
11:30- 114/330
12:30- 160/335 foiled
1:10- 188/325  probing starts
1:30- 201/325 done

Foiled at 160 with a splash of apple juice.

 

9.JPG

 

 

Started probing at 188- still some resistance. Wanted to probe in another 30 minute but the temperature was rising too fast. AT 201f the thinnest parts probed like butter and there was a slight resistance in the thicker sections, but I pulled it from the heat as I'm learning and didn't want to end up with pulled brisket. Removed from pan and juice, wrapped up in foil and into some blankets.

 

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An hour later the temp was getting near 170 so I put it into a 170 oven to hold it until dinner. Darn brisket was done too soon. Never had that problem before. Very good. Could have been sightly more tender, very juicy. Victory!

 

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post #13 of 13

Looks FANTASTIC!!! Thanks for following up on your new method. I'm smoking my first brisket today and your post was very helpful!

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