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slicing dried beef

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I realize once I start to slice it I'll get my answer , but here it goes anyway . I cured and dried a piece of bottom round roast and I'm wondering if you would slice it with the grain or against the grain . With the grain it seems like it would be stringy but against the grain I think maybe it would just crumble all apart . Like I said , I'm sure I'll get an answer when I start slicing but I probably won't start that until tonight . Thanks

post #2 of 9

Try it both ways see which one works the best for you.

post #3 of 9

like pastrami i will  cut it 90' to the grain

post #4 of 9

Across the grain & very thin makes it even more tender---Melts in your mouth:

 

 

Link:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/93718/smoked-dried-beef-with-lots-of-qview

 

351sfpu.jpg

 

Bear

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks . Your post that you've provided the link for is what gave me the idea to do it . I just tasted the little tip of it and it was pretty good . I put some brown sugar into the bag about 5 days after it started to cure . I'm just too lazy to get out my slicer and slice it . I started it out with the Butcher Packer maple sugar cure ( I think that's the name of it ) One thing about that cure as opposed to the tenderquick ( which is what I usually use ) The maple cure is alot less salty . When I first used it to make some canadian bacon I soaked the meat for an hour in fresh water , changing the water once , when it was through curing ( just like I do when I use tenderquick ) and it had what I would call no saltiness what so ever . I forgot about that with this beef and I went ahead and did the hour soak so I have an idea mine won't be very salty .

post #6 of 9

Unless your Beef is JERKY Dry, slicing across the grain will be more tender and should not crumble...JJ

post #7 of 9

I agree with the above, across the grain!

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsdspif View Post

Thanks . Your post that you've provided the link for is what gave me the idea to do it . I just tasted the little tip of it and it was pretty good . I put some brown sugar into the bag about 5 days after it started to cure . I'm just too lazy to get out my slicer and slice it . I started it out with the Butcher Packer maple sugar cure ( I think that's the name of it ) One thing about that cure as opposed to the tenderquick ( which is what I usually use ) The maple cure is alot less salty . When I first used it to make some canadian bacon I soaked the meat for an hour in fresh water , changing the water once , when it was through curing ( just like I do when I use tenderquick ) and it had what I would call no saltiness what so ever . I forgot about that with this beef and I went ahead and did the hour soak so I have an idea mine won't be very salty .

 

Others say about the saltiness of TQ too. I have never soaked any Beef or Pork for longer than 1/2 to 1 hour, after using TQ, and I have never had anything too salty.

In fact most of the time I can't taste any salt at all---Neither can my wife, Son, and anyone we give some to.

The only time I ever tasted too much salt was when I used Hi Mt Cure & Seasoning.

 

I don't know what it is---Maybe because I add 1 or 2 tsp per pound of meat too, and put it in on the first curing day???   My guess.

 

Also: I do taste salt in my Dried Beef, but not too much salt. The stuff you buy in stores is 3 times as salty.

This is because you dehydrate a lot of moisture out of Dried Beef, through a long smoke, and that leaves a heavier salt content in the much lesser amount of remaining meat.

Store Bought is dried much more than I dry mine, so theirs is much saltier.

 

Bear
 

 

post #9 of 9

Not sure why I havent made this yet!!!

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