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First Brisket Issues - Page 2

post #21 of 29

What are you complaining about?  That looks like great meat to me?

 

Yeah, briskets need some trimming, but I like a little fat cap, too.

 

My best luck has been doing them at about 220 pit temps.

 

They all finish in their own time.

 

Again, yours looks like a good meal to me?

 

Good luck and good smoking.

post #22 of 29

No complaints on my end.  What time is dinner?

post #23 of 29

That is one humungas brisket.  Bigger than the weber it was smoked in..

post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redclaymud View Post

That is one humungas brisket.  Bigger than the weber it was smoked in..



18lb. And I have another in the fridge...

post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 

A week of reflection has created some perspective...

This was my first packer but my second brisket. The first was a highly trimmed flat using a smokenator.

Frankly, this packer was more moist but less flavorful than the first smoke. It wasn't smoky enough. Why? I'm thinking less fat simply means more smoke and rub flavor. All that fat improves moisture but "protects" the meat too much.

I'm thinking the best of both worlds is to remove as much fat as possible, inject, and cook low to get 7+ hours of smoke on it.

Just the thoughts of a novice.

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision View Post

A week of reflection has created some perspective...

This was my first packer but my second brisket. The first was a highly trimmed flat using a smokenator.

Frankly, this packer was more moist but less flavorful than the first smoke. It wasn't smoky enough. Why? I'm thinking less fat simply means more smoke and rub flavor. All that fat improves moisture but "protects" the meat too much.
 

 

I learned long ago that leaving the fat-cap on is a compromise of higher moisture retention, slower cooking for more tender meat, but in most every case, reducing smoke penetration/reaction on the fat-side to null. You may want to try trimming-up a packer and leaving just thin strips of fat...just enough to do a bit of sefl basting...smoke can still get between the fat strips, so a bit more smoke to that side of the meat.


I'm thinking the best of both worlds is to remove as much fat as possible, inject, and cook low to get 7+ hours of smoke on it.
 

 

If you inject, beware of the danger-zone times/temps as it can no longer be considered intact whole muscle meat at that point, and lower temp smoke chamber won't get you through the danger zone in time (41-135* in 4 hrs) to be safe. I don't inject brines or marinades into ANYTHIING that's fresh meat anymore just so I can stay within the intact whole muscle guidelines...brine/cure injection would be the only exception for me. Also, if the meat is boneless (example: pork shoulder/butt), the boned areas (any place that's penetrated by a knife, etc) need to stay open when cooking, then it can be considered whole muscle as well.


Just the thoughts of a novice.


Just making sure you understood where you're heading and what it all means before you go that direction.

 

Have fun smoking!


Eric

 

 

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision View Post

A week of reflection has created some perspective...

This was my first packer but my second brisket. The first was a highly trimmed flat using a smokenator.

Frankly, this packer was more moist but less flavorful than the first smoke. It wasn't smoky enough. Why? I'm thinking less fat simply means more smoke and rub flavor. All that fat improves moisture but "protects" the meat too much.

I'm thinking the best of both worlds is to remove as much fat as possible, inject, and cook low to get 7+ hours of smoke on it.

Just the thoughts of a novice.


Vision,

I don't know if this will help you, but there is another way to utilize the fat, and still get all the smoke, if you can use more than one rack in your smoker.

This is a method SmokinAl uses on some things:

Trim the fat off of the outside of the meat, but save it.

Then put the meat (Brisket in this case) on the second rack, and put the fat on the top rack (over the meat).

That way the fat can drip down on the meat, keeping it moist, and there is nothing blocking the smoke from flavoring the meat.

 

Al does this on his Awesome Hams too!!!

 

 

Bear

 

post #28 of 29

Ha Ha, thanks for the endorsement Bear!

 

How did you know I had a ham in the fridge waiting for some smoke magic?

 

Walmart just got some of the uncooked ones in, that I like. I picked out a real good looking one.

 

Probably go on the smoker sometime next week!

 

Sorry Vision, didn't mean to hijack your thread!   icon_redface.gif

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinAl View Post

Ha Ha, thanks for the endorsement Bear!

 

How did you know I had a ham in the fridge waiting for some smoke magic?

 

Walmart just got some of the uncooked ones in, that I like. I picked out a real good looking one.

 

Probably go on the smoker sometime next week!

 

Sorry Vision, didn't mean to hijack your thread!   icon_redface.gif

 

Bears know these things!
Bears have the best sense of smell of any animal on earth.

 

Sorry Vision, but the question needed to be answered.   biggrin.gif

 

 

Bear

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