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Grettings from NH!!

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hello!  new to smoking but just recieved a brinkman "smoke n' grill" for fathers day so i am very excited to start learning the art!  i am still trying to figure this forum out and just reading what i can when i can.  i have a 6 minth old son so spare time is scarce right now.  i do have a few questions though:

 

1.  are there any modifications that i should/have to make to get the best results?

2. what should i try first?

3. what are some good rub/marinade recipes i should try?

4. what is the best wood type to use?

 

obviously some of these question arent a simple right or wrong and mostly have opinion based answers but i am just looking for the right direction to head in. 

 

i am looking forward to hearing some feed back and more importantly i am looking forward to the meat!

post #2 of 10

Welcome to the SMF family!  Congrats on the new rig!!  & the new baby!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TayCharb View Post

Hello!  new to smoking but just recieved a brinkman "smoke n' grill" for fathers day so i am very excited to start learning the art!  i am still trying to figure this forum out and just reading what i can when i can.  i have a 6 minth old son so spare time is scarce right now.  i do have a few questions though:

 

1.  are there any modifications that i should/have to make to get the best results?  Search the forums for mods.  There are a few that are key in these upright models.

2. what should i try first?  Keep your first smoke simple and inexpensive so you can learn how to work your rig.  Chicken parts, pork chops, burgers are a good place to start.

3. what are some good rub/marinade recipes i should try?  Jeff's is good.  I've used Rudy's with good results.  Mostly I just use salt, pepper and whatever else strikes my fancy that's in the cupboard.

4. what is the best wood type to use?  Depends on what you're smoking.  Pork can take just about any wood.  Poultry & fish need something lighter, like fruit or nut woods, IMHO.  It's a matter of personal taste, mostly.

 

obviously some of these question arent a simple right or wrong and mostly have opinion based answers but i am just looking for the right direction to head in. 

 

i am looking forward to hearing some feed back and more importantly i am looking forward to the meat!



 

post #3 of 10

welcome1.gif   Glad to have you with us!

post #4 of 10
post #5 of 10

welcome-smiley.gif to SMF  I am glad you joint us 

post #6 of 10

Welcome to the SMF. Glad to have you here. Lots of good folks, great recipes and knowledge. Looking forward to  your first qview. icon14.gif

post #7 of 10

 welcome44.gif


Welcome to SMF, Glad to have you with us.


This is the place to learn, lots of good info and helpful friendly Members.
 

Many of our members have years of experience in smoking meat.  They are more than happy helping Newbies learn the art.
 

We have members who cure there own Bacon, Hams, Jerky, Snack Sticks, Make Their own Sausage, etc. if you want to learn,
this is the place. 
 

Don't be afraid to ask questions of them and follow their advice. You won't be sorry, you will be making great Q in no time at all...

Just remember, when curing your own meats follow the instructions included with the cure to the letter, this is not something to experiment with.  


Never use more cure no mater if it is Tender Quick or Cure #1 or Cure #2 than the manufacturer says to use, this can be very dangerous.
 

Tender Quick and Cure#1 or Cure #2 are not interchangeable, neither Cure #1 interchangeable with Cure #2 or vise versa
 

Sign up for Jeff's 5-Day eCourse.  Click Here

 

Tips For New Members.

  1. Go into your profile and Under Location put where you are.
  2. City & State or Area & State will do. This will help members when answering your questions.
  3. Go to ROLL CALL thread and tell us a little about Yourself (A Name We Can Call You) and Experience & Equipment.
  4. Do Not Post  your other questions and smokes in the Roll Call Forum.
  5. Post your questions and smokes in the Proper Forum, Beef, Pork, Sausage, Electric Smoker, Charcoal Smoker etc.
  6. Use the Wiki Section, many of our members have posted great tutorials and instructional threads so take advantage of them.
  7. When you can't find an answer ask plenty of questions, we have some highly experienced members willing to help you.
  8. When posting about your smokes be sure to post plenty of Qview (Pictures) Our Moto, "No Pics, Didn't Happen".
  9. Get a good Probe Thermometer, Don't Depend on the Built in Thermometer in your Smoker (They are notorious for being off).
  10. A good choice for a remote dual probe thermometer is the Maverick ET-732
  11. Remember, We Always Cook by Temperature and NOT BY TIME...
  12. Don't Take Chances, Always Follow USDA Safety Guidelines When Handling Meat.
  13. If you are wanting to get into curing meat, there are many members here more than happy to help and give good advice.

  14. If you are unsure of a procedure ASK, don't ASSUME, It will make your Smoking experience much more pleasant...

post #8 of 10

Glad you joined us

 welcome1.gif

post #9 of 10

Hello fellow Granite Stater !!  Glad to see  you here. You will love your new smoker once you get the hang of it. Maybe try some chicken wings - Italian Sausage or some Moinks.

All are pretty easy. Tons of recipes available here. 

Good luck and good smokin'

post #10 of 10

Welcome to SMF.  Despite the trifecta of evil in your avatar (just kidding - I'm a Yankees, Knicks, Islanders fan).  By the way Boston has become quite the title town in the last few years.  Must be nice.

 

Any way, back to the smoking.  I defer to others about the mods and whether they are necessary for your first attempts.  For meats, I dove into the deep end of the pool on my first charcoal smoke with a brisket, but it's probably easier to start with some chicken or other inexpensive meat.  Just remember most of the recommendations here are based on temperature so the best investment you can make is a good probe thermometer so you don't have to open the chamber.

 

As for the "best" wood, it all depends on what you are cooking.  Woods like hickory and mesquite are very strong in their flavor and are best on meats like pork or beef.  Poultry and fish tend to come out better with the fruit woods (Cherry, Apple) or other lighter woods such as Sugar Maple, Ash or Oak.  But is all personal preference and taste.  Don't be afraid to mix woods too as some can have great results.    

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