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80/20 beef?? - Page 2

post #21 of 29

Dang Pops...I always believe what you say...

 

So just tell me that this is a BS story and maybe I will try tubed burger again!!

 

  Craig

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/31/us/31meat.html 

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef Willie View Post

Never was fond of the 'tube steak'....you are talking about hot dogs, aren't you Bear??


That's the only type I ever tried. I love hot dogs & smoked sausage.

 

 

Bear

 

 

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef Willie View Post



 


Never was fond of the 'tube steak'....you are talking about hot dogs, aren't you Bear??
 

 


Good one Willie. I don't think Bear caught this one!

 

post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinAl View Post


Good one Willie. I don't think Bear caught this one!

 


LOL---Get serious---Bear started it !   roflmao.gif

 

Second reply was just to cover my tracks & stay out of trouble!

 

 

Bear

 

post #25 of 29

Now it all makes sense. 

post #26 of 29

Nope, actual happened; I had the opportunity through Great American to take a field trip to Moyer Packing Plant in Pa. and observed their operation from kill floor to out-the-door product.  They had TOTAL sanitation control, eliminating bacteria at every step.

 

This is a response I gave to one of the pm's I received:

 

"Well, beef is beef regardless where it's from or who prepares it; the primary difference is the way its prepared and the sanitation controls used.  In a local butcher shop or a chain store with in-house meatcutters, the ground meat produced has a 24 hour shelf life; this is standard.  Put it out one day and pull it the next.  In a packing house, the shelf life is up to 45 days.  The difference is sanitation control.  Same beef, just how it's handled.  

I spent a day at Moyer Packing Plant in Pa. observing their operation, from kill floor to production to packaging and out-the-door product.  It was an eye-opening experience!  The total sanitation control of every step in their operation was far beyond hospital conditions!   They processed western beef as well as local canners and cutters for lean trim; every single part of the animal was used, right down to hiring asian workers who had small fingers to pluck the nose hairs from the animal noses and ears for fine artist brushes; the hairs bringing over $5,000 per lb. in value!  Complete equipment washdown every 8 hours, all workers in hospital gowns, hats, face masks and booties, if someone sneezes that section is immediately totally sanitized and the worker is sent home for 24 hour minimum - I mean TOTAL sanitation control.  Absolutely no comparison to a local butcher shop or store operation.  You have to go through two separate air locks to even be able to enter the building.  No outside clothing is allowed; you have to strip and change into worker clothing that is totally sanitized, then don gowns, masks, booties and hats besides.  

No preference, all major brand products enact the same rigorous standards.

Yes, it is my choice over locally produced beef that can have bacteria introduced into the cutting and processing operation indiscriminately, especially in ground meat as it has 1,000 times more surface area that bacteria can be introduced into as well."

 

Far from being inferior, it is the total opposite, it is superior in every sense, plus because of mass production, it is cheaper also.


Quote:
Originally Posted by fpnmf View Post

Dang Pops...I always believe what you say...

 

So just tell me that this is a BS story and maybe I will try tubed burger again!!

 

  Craig

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/31/us/31meat.html 



 

post #27 of 29

I can vouch for that plant Pops is talking about. "MOPAC" is about 20 miles from here, and 10 miles from my home town. I know/knew a lot of people who worked there for many years, and I have heard all about the measures they go through to keep everything sterile.

Even the guy (fellow Viet-Vet) who has been cutting my hair for 45 years worked there for many years. All he did every day all day, for awhile, was debone Hams. Then he cut hair at night. He said it's like he was working in some kind of a DNA Laboratory.

 

Bear

post #28 of 29

i have used BPI beef for many years in the food industry, i also prefer the tube ground beef for he same reasons pops mentioned. i always figured the food safety controls @ the plants were always above what your supermarket practices.

post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 

Just to chime in I think the people objecting to tubed ground beef do so because the color of the meat is usually pale red or almost Gray.  I also sense a taste and texture difference.

 

My nephew used to cut meat for Sam's and said all they do is open a couple of tubes of meat, regrind it and package it for the counter.  Seems that by running it through the grinder again brings the red back ( oxygenates the meat) and solves the texture concern.

 

I have done this in the past and it does work,  I seldom buy the saran wrapped ground meat anymore  I will buy the tube and regrind, if I need quantities of ground meat for things like burgers, meatloaf and meat sauces.  I usually buy whole cuts and grind for sausage and specialty burgers.  Like Mark said I'll add a bit of pork or ribeye fat when making burgers for company.  I do like combining different cuts.

 

This is one of the first beef sausages I'll be making so I really wasn't sure what cuts to use when making 80/20.  I know pork butt is pretty close but didn't know how it related to beef.

 

Interesting thread, I can agree with everything POPS has said, I really believe the reluctance to use tube meat (aside from the snickering) is the color and texture. 

 

Al

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