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Bologna problem - Page 2

post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by solaryellow View Post

Since he said oven, I am assuming that is what he meant.


OOOOPS, sorry Solar!

 

When I hear or read electric, my one track mind always thinks electric smoker.

So far I have never gone from smoker to electric oven.

 

I used an electric oven enough, before I bought a smoker

 

My error,

bear

 

post #22 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post




OOOOPS, sorry Solar!

 

When I hear or read electric, my one track mind always thinks electric smoker.

So far I have never gone from smoker to electric oven.

 

I used an electric oven enough, before I bought a smoker

 

My error,

bear

 



 

No worries. icon_wink.gif

post #23 of 35

One reason, and this is only my guess, is that the electric oven is a dry heat, which could be drying your casing. Where as, gas heat has a lot of moisture in it. I learned this whem using my motorhomes stove for some heat, because my furnace would not start. I was not cooking anything at the time. I got an excessive amoint of moisture on the windows just from the gas..

post #24 of 35

I might as well take a guess too...

 

Maybe it was do to..... stuffed too tight, high heat, dry heat, old casing or just Murphy's law?

post #25 of 35

If moisture in the oven could cause the casings to split, or to be more precise, a lack of moisture, then Randy above is correct, gas ovens put out a good bit of moisture from combustion, where electric elements do no such thing.  It is why it is OK to hold fried chicken in an electric (if hold it you must), but do it in gas, and you get soggy breading.

 

John

post #26 of 35
I'm sure this bologna has long been eaten.............................
post #27 of 35

I couldn't agree more..... icon_redface.gif

post #28 of 35

Assuming the casings were fibrous, in my opininon it could be three things.

 

1. The casings were overstuffed

 

2. The temp was too high

 

3. The casings were not soaked long enough [I dont think this was mentioned as probable cause] I had a bud of mine just stuff in dry fibrous casings and this happened. Fibrous casings should be soaked properly.

 

Reinhard

post #29 of 35

please send me the sausage. I will be happy to examine , test, taste whatever I need to do. After I finish it I will give you an honest opinion. No? OK. To your knowledge did you have any " flare-ups "in Oven? Excess fat dripping down.I would start out by checking temps of both ovens with same thermometer. I also ease the temps up.For example , I never take it to the higher temps right away.

   Pack your meat as cold as you possibly can. One more question. Does the meat at the tear area taste slightly burnt and is it drier? Whatever the cause , the meat should be just fine to eat. I think all of has had that happen for whatever reason.I might doctor it up a little but I would not , could not , throw it away.If you are in the early stages of sausage business I would not offer this for sale.Not for safety reasons but you want your sausages to be at their best. Hope this helps. Weisswurst happy SM

post #30 of 35
What is your recipe? I just made my first batch of deer bologna and it was awful!!
post #31 of 35


What was awful about it? Weisswurst

post #32 of 35
What was your recipe Gsxr. The more info you can share the easier it is for us to help ya, recipe and cooking procedure is most important for starters.
post #33 of 35
It crumbles when you cut it...seems dry ...and flavor is off...I did 3 lbs venison to 1 lb pork 90% lean...probably need more fat, huh?
post #34 of 35
Yeah that's real low, you have 2.5% fat and you really want 20-30%
post #35 of 35

I agree about fat content suggested by DanM. If I were using beef I would stick to about 20% With venison it wouldn't hurt to have it about 30% A couple of questions .. were you making a " Venison Bologna " based on a recipe from a book or  a friends recipe? Were you trying to make a ring bologna , Bologna stick or as it is sometimes called a chub or " large " bologna that will fit a slice of bread? What type of casing did you use? What is your basic process? As one of the guys mentioned , the more info we have the better able we are to offer help. This is a great web with very knowledgeable people. Always willing to help. Happy SM Weisswurst

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