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liguid meat tenderizers

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

 I have seen a product called 3 V Liguid meat tenderizer. It says that it is all natural . Has no  fat , carbs , salt , msg. taste odor. Has anyone ever used this product  for grilling , cooking , sausage making?  Thanks for any help Happy grilling Weisswurst

post #2 of 18

never used that type of tenderizer but it has to be papya based.

only thing i could think of that would be all natural ?

 

post #3 of 18

yep, refined papain from papayas, according to the website, and water

post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 

As Chef Willie said it is papain from the papaya. My interest is because it has no sodium. i was wondering if any one has ever used it and if it actually makes a difference.Or is it like the tenderizing properties in Pineapples which can turn sausage meat into mush.Thanks for the responses . HAPPY GRILLIN AND SMOKIN. Weisswurst

post #5 of 18

Not sure.  I know a lot of corned beef briskets I by from the store have a "tenderized with papian" line on the label.  So it must be a fairly accepted practice.  It didn't turn the brisket to mush.  But then again it would likely take a lot to turn a brisket to mush.  Might depend on what you plan to use it on.

post #6 of 18

Try it and see what you think.  I gave up on "meat tenderizers" back in the 70's.  Yes, I am that old.

 

I found that they either make the outside mushy and never reach the inside, or they make the whole dang thing mushy.  Having said that, try it, and if you like it there is no problem.

 

Good luck and good smoking!

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks Dude and Venture. I am that old also. I am not usually interested in store bought enhancers but in this case I would like to see if it would help me to emulsfy meat for sausage making or if i would just have a grainy mush.And the typical meat tenderizers are loaded with salt.Some of the sausages I want to make must  have the meat  reduced in size . Not having a silent cutter I am wondering if I grind twice with a 1/8 grinder then add the tenderizer , if that would do the trick. The ones I am interested in doing are not smoked.Weisswurst , bockwurst , octoberfest sausage are filled with very fine meat. I have tried using a house hold blender but not good.On the sausage thread someone said to try double grinding with 3/16 for hot dogs or ring bologna. I think that would work for that but not for the wesswurst , etc.If the tenderizer would help the meat to break down a little it might work. An alternative is to get a top end blender but that is not in my future right now. Thanks for responding . Happy grillin and smokin. Weisswurst

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Venture View Post

Try it and see what you think.  I gave up on "meat tenderizers" back in the 70's.  Yes, I am that old.

 

I found that they either make the outside mushy and never reach the inside, or they make the whole dang thing mushy.  Having said that, try it, and if you like it there is no problem.

 

Good luck and good smoking!


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ what he said, and my time line goes back to the 60'sa42.gif

 

 

 

Have fun and...
 

 

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys and I will try it. if it works I will pass the info on. My time also goes back a long way. I am a true " baby " boomer . born in 46 .  What got me into sausage making was when I was a kid there was a family butcher / Bologna maker in Yale  , Michigan that made the best ring Bologna . If you mention Bologna to any one around here that is over 40 , they will say " aint nowhere as good as Minnies " Yale bologna makes a decent but not always consistent imitation of the old " Minnies " I make a really good ring I call Maggies after my wonderful grandmother. Her and I and my grandpa would travel from Unionville Michigan into Bay city with a load of scrap iron. It was grandpa , a ring of good bologna and a pepsi ( beer for him ) and grandma.  Sorry for the trip down memory lane. Happy grillin and smokin Weiss wurst

post #10 of 18

 

I have never made an emulsified sausage, but I have a couple of recipes waiting to be tried.  In his book, Kutas recommends grinding the meat and then finishing it off in small batches in a good strong food processor.  I haven't tried it yet, but the idea comes from a very respected source.

 

Good luck and good smoking!

 

post #11 of 18

Cool story Weiss. I guess I'm a young buck being born in 54.

I never had any luck emulsifying meat in the food processor but I find a double grind with the 3/16th plate with all but frozen meat gets me close enough for what I want

As far as the meat tenderizer, I've never heard of it but would look into it, and probably will.

post #12 of 18

Sounds interesting, and would like to know more as well.

post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

I consider the book from TSM to be a text book. Kutas was very thorough. I tried emulsifying the meat years ago as a result of reading his instructions. I am going to have to blame the poor results more on me than the blender. Impatience etc.If I have no other option I will buy a more substantial blender. Some folks on a different thread offered a couple of processor suggestions. I have them filed away.If i could use a natural meat tenderizer that would do the job and still get the flavor and texture I want that would be good. I am a little skeptical but the tenderizer is less than 10 dollars so I can try it first.Thanks for your response. happy grillin and smokin Weisswurst

post #14 of 18

Actually, I have a lot of doubts in my own ability to do an emulsified sausage, even with good instructions.  That is probably why these recipes are staring at me and have never been used.

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 

THATS ABOUT WHERE i AM . HOWEVER THERES GOT TO BE A WAY WITHOUT REFINANCING MY HOUSE TO GET A SILENT CUTTER THAT MIGHT NOT WORK EITHER. THANKS

post #16 of 18

Meat tenderizer, Papain, works to not only dissolve collagen connective tissue but has the ability to dissolve muscle fibers as well, specifically the peptide bonds that hold the proteins together. They work (do the most damage IMHO) with the application of Low and Slow Heat, like smoking or over Time, like the storage, including freezing, of large quantities of sausage. When meat is cooked the coils of protein that make up muscle cells denature, unravel as it were, becoming more tender. The muscle cells also begin to break open releasing moisture that in turn changes the collagen holding them together into gelatin further tenderizing the meat. This MESH of protein, muscle fibers, collagen and gelatin, if not seriously over cooked IT over 210*F, will hold the liberated and/or introduced moisture in and we get a Tender, Juicy, piece of meat or sausage. The PROBLEM is Meat tenderizer is TOO EFFECTIVE at dissolving protein and collagen. The Protein and Collagen is broken down so fine that there is no Mesh to retain moisture! The juices run out of the meat and you are left with what is texturally CHALKY SAND! If you or your Mom ever cooked LIVER to death you know Exactly what texture I am describing!

 

The last time Adolph's Meat Tenderizer was in my Fathers house was back in the 70's. Mom liberally sprinkled the stuff on a couple of 1 and 1/2 inch thick  Sirloin Steaks that morning and refrigerated them to tenderize. One thing lead to another Dad was late and we all went out to McDonald's for burgers that night. The next evening Dad fired up the Grill and cooked those beauties to a perfect Med Rare. WE ALL SPIT OUT THE FIRST BITE! The outer most 1/4 inch on both sides of the meat was chalky and dry and could literally be SCRAPED off! The interior meat was juicy but had the same texture as any other properly cooked med rare Sirloin. We ate some of it but the Dog enjoyed the lions share and that new bottle of Adolf's went in the garbage.

 

A Silent Cutter aka Buffalo Chopper is really nothing more than a Slow Speed Food Processor. Since it's blade spins slower and the rotating bowl cycles the product past it, there is less friction and less heat build up. A  Food Processor that is Pulsed and frequently scraped will get the job done without the 4 figure price tag. This Bad Boy should do the job and the dough kneading speed and blade may be just the ticket for emulsifying ...JJ http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-FP-14DC-Collection-14-Cup-Processor/dp/B002I5DMU0 

post #17 of 18

Thanks Jimmy. Reading your posts, is easier and cheaper than attending the CIA.

 

I use alot of GOYA products and incorporate their beverages into marinades, rubs and sauces. I get a mixed lot for Xmas.

 

GOOGLE Goya and look at what you can use. Alot of ideas for taste.

 

I remember reading that carbonated beverages break-down and tenderize.  I have used Goya Papaya carbonated drink.

 

KK

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by weisswurst View Post
 

Thanks guys and I will try it. if it works I will pass the info on. My time also goes back a long way. I am a true " baby " boomer . born in 46 .  What got me into sausage making was when I was a kid there was a family butcher / Bologna maker in Yale  , Michigan that made the best ring Bologna . If you mention Bologna to any one around here that is over 40 , they will say " aint nowhere as good as Minnies " Yale bologna makes a decent but not always consistent imitation of the old " Minnies " I make a really good ring I call Maggies after my wonderful grandmother. Her and I and my grandpa would travel from Unionville Michigan into Bay city with a load of scrap iron. It was grandpa , a ring of good bologna and a pepsi ( beer for him ) and grandma.  Sorry for the trip down memory lane. Happy grillin and smokin Weiss wurst

Sorry so late to this thread but I've been dreaming about yale bologna for years.  It was one of the treats my grandfather and I would share in the 60's before we left for Canada.  I have considered trying to recreate but 45 year old taste memories are hard to quantify!  Would you share your Maggies recipe/procedure in hopes I might start to recreate my Yale bologna memories here in Canada?

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