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Do you coat ribs before rub or rub them naked? - Page 2

post #21 of 35

I've done both as well. I like using the mustard because it seems to hold the rub on better.

post #22 of 35

We've always found the Mustard does a great job of improving the bark, though we've never used it on ribs.  Our best results have come when we use our rub directly on the meat and THEN coated with Mustard.  Has always seemed odd to me to put mustard between the pork and the rub, when they get along so well together. 

post #23 of 35

I am a mustard man use it on all my pork products.  I like the way it helps the rub sick never had problems with taste or with bark since I have started to use the mustard.  I first saw mustard used on ribs watching a bbq show on the food network some 8 years ago.  This was before I had my ribs down like i do now.  When i told my wife i was going to try this method she told me she woud not eat them.  I made two rack of ribs the next smoke one with one without and she liked the one with mustard more.  My rib recipie has evolved over the last 10 years all around what my wife likes.  One day she finally told me don't change a thing and I haven't since.

post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ECTO1 View Post

I am a mustard man use it on all my pork products.  I like the way it helps the rub sick never had problems with taste or with bark since I have started to use the mustard.  I first saw mustard used on ribs watching a bbq show on the food network some 8 years ago.  This was before I had my ribs down like i do now.  When i told my wife i was going to try this method she told me she woud not eat them.  I made two rack of ribs the next smoke one with one without and she liked the one with mustard more.  My rib recipie has evolved over the last 10 years all around what my wife likes.  One day she finally told me don't change a thing and I haven't since.


When the boss speaks.. you have to listenicon_mrgreen.gif

 

Sounds like you have a solid process that works.. congrats!!

post #25 of 35

If ya like sweet and spicy Try, 2 parts yellow mustard , 1 part molasses  . 1 tsp liquid crab boil .

 mix and apply to ribs or butts before the rub.

post #26 of 35

The flavored mustards now offer more options to add flavor and different bark. I know several that use mustard, steak sauce and honey as a glue.I like the sweet-hot types. It does add flavor when you let it penetrate longer than just slather and rub. My choice is fruit juices, whether just out of a soak or sprayed on. Several ways to get good product, that's for sure. Steve.

post #27 of 35

I have always used mustard on all my pork products. I love the bark that it creates and it keeps the rub on there nice a good.

post #28 of 35

I used to use mustard, but have since switched to Maple Syrup for pork. Still use mustard on briskets though

post #29 of 35

BBQ is all about trial and error. Jeff makes the error part a very small percentage of your trials.  Wash your ribs, dry thoroughly, use your nose to detect age, remove the membrane, then be liberal with your application of French's yellow mustard. Now buy Jeff's rub recipe, make a fresh batch each time, and apply evenly until you can't see any yellow and then...let the ribs set until there is a beautiful, glistening crust. The aroma will be wonderful. I don't rub, pat or otherwise disturb the rub, just insert your meat thermometer probe and gently place on your grate. These ribs will not need to be mopped as the crust of rub seals the meat. Just be sure to monitor your meat temp and ambient oven air temp at grate level carefully. Consistent success depends on keeping the air temp constant within a swing of about 15 degrees. Over a 5 to seven hour cook you can come real close to your ideal cooking temp average. One other note, my experience has shown the moisture content of the dark brown sugar is an important variable in Jeff's rub recipe. If you use a left over batch, the bite of the spices becomes pronounced rather than subtle.  I watched the video and my take on all the brown sugar and mop is that you really won't taste the meat.  Well BBQ'd  pork is a delight when cooked low and slow. Not at all greasy and the aroma is clean, not unlike fresh fish when cooked. Enjoy your time at the smoker!

post #30 of 35
I put a coat of mustard on my ribs. You can't taste it when they're done, but it makes the rub stick better.
post #31 of 35

I Have tried both and have not noticed any difference.

 

I have no problem getting a ton of rub on without the mustard.

I believe that by using mustard you get the rub to stick immediately, however,  I get the same results when coating my ribs in a lined pan then wrapping tightly, less mess in my opinion.

Some have made claims that the vinegar in the mustard helps make the meat more tender.

 

Bottom line is you will need to make that choice and either way you cant go wrong

 

Mustard Pros.

  • Good ammount of rub adheres quickly

Mustard cons

  • Messier than naked (but fun)
  • Adding another step

 

 

Naked Pros

  • Deleting a step
  • Not as messy as mustard

Naked Cons

  • Rub needs to sit a bit more on ribs to get the same result as mustard (not a con in my opinion)
post #32 of 35

I coat my ribs and usually use yellow mustard but I have also used Yoshidas and it gives a little different flavor...

post #33 of 35

I've used mustard and Worcestershire sauce and both gave great results.  I actually have had better results (fall off the bone baby backs) with the WS but the mustard has been a very close second and I wouldn't hesitate to use it again.  I did a brisket last weekend with mustard and it rocked!  I haven't tried Dijon mustard yet.  Has anyone gone down that road confused.gif

post #34 of 35

Has anyone tried to use molasses instead of mustard for adhering the rub?

post #35 of 35
Mustard is supposed to do a couple of things..one it gives my rub a brighter apperance, I've used molasses before and it comes out way darker although you can't taste either in the finished product. two it helps to "melt" the rub and helps to even out the flavor of the meat. Another point is that yellow mustard has vinegar as an ingredient and that helps break down the meat although I'm not sure how much it would help the tenderness if at all. I also believe that the mustard with the rub creates a better sealing of the meat. Just my two cents
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