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2nd time smoking ribs same problems - Page 3

post #41 of 48

One thing I didn't see mentioned.... if you did end up with creasote created in your smoke chamber you need to clean out the inside of your smoker and reseason it before you smoke any more meat. The reason being is once you create a bunch of creasote it is all over the inside of your smoker and will "flavor" your smokes untill you clean it out. Two methods for cleaning are:

  1. Take a bucket of water and some simple green and scrub out the inside of the smoker. Light a small fire just to dry it. Once it is cool spray the inside with Pam and re-season it.

 or

   2. Light a really hot fire and burn out the inside of the smoker. Then re-season it.

post #42 of 48
Thread Starter 

You guys are awesome, thanks for all the suggestions.

 

I didn't want to spend another day in front of the smoker again last weekend so didn't try it again. The other day I picked up a 9lb pork shoulder and cut it in half to get more time with my smoker with out having to spend to much time waiting to see the results :) Plus I'm only cooking for my wife and I and would hate to see all that food go to waste if we don't eat it all. 

 

At this point I believe my major issue was putting cold fuel on a hot fire so I'm going to start a good fire, clean the smoker to get rid of any creosote, then load up the smoker with fuel. My plan is to have the fire box loaded with fuel and the fire only burning on one side. I'm then hoping to see the fire burn through the fuel with out me having to add any cold fuel. If this does happen I'll add the cold fuel on the other side of the fire box and slowly push it closer to the fire.

post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawydiuk View Post

You guys are awesome, thanks for all the suggestions.

 

I didn't want to spend another day in front of the smoker again last weekend so didn't try it again. The other day I picked up a 9lb pork shoulder and cut it in half to get more time with my smoker with out having to spend to much time waiting to see the results :) Plus I'm only cooking for my wife and I and would hate to see all that food go to waste if we don't eat it all. 

 

At this point I believe my major issue was putting cold fuel on a hot fire so I'm going to start a good fire, clean the smoker to get rid of any creosote, then load up the smoker with fuel. My plan is to have the fire box loaded with fuel and the fire only burning on one side. I'm then hoping to see the fire burn through the fuel with out me having to add any cold fuel. If this does happen I'll add the cold fuel on the other side of the fire box and slowly push it closer to the fire.



What works really well when having to add fuel mid smoke is to get a full chimney of lump about half lit, then dump it into your smoker. It makes a huge differance.

post #44 of 48

You could try using an Amaze-N- Smoker and for a good thermometer Todd at AMAZE-N-Products sells the NEW Maverick ET-732.  You could get an AMNS and Thermometer at the same time...  Looks Like He also has $5.00 shipping on orders over $49.00

post #45 of 48

I use a spicy rub and it always turns out great. start my fire and regulate at 225 -240. then add oak wood . use the intake vents and open stack all the way. I haven't ever had a bad slab or anything I smoke. I have a 2011 Smoke Hollow, 72 inches ling with a side box, next to that is a charcole box, next to that a 3 burner propane box and next to that a searing box. Stands 4 ft high has wheels and a supply tray on the bottom. what a great bbq smoker, I love using it, bought it at Osh Hardware. look it up in their items list for outdoor supplies.

post #46 of 48

Been reading this thread and have learned a lot. I use an electric smoker now but am having a stick burner built. I would have added cold charcoal to the fire box instead of lighting it first in a chimney, I plan an using straight wood instead of charcoal but if I choose to use charcoal I will get it going before I put it in the fire box. But now I have the question that-----if I am using wood only, how do I add more wood without getting the white smoke?

post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokeman62 View Post

Been reading this thread and have learned a lot. I use an electric smoker now but am having a stick burner built. I would have added cold charcoal to the fire box instead of lighting it first in a chimney, I plan an using straight wood instead of charcoal but if I choose to use charcoal I will get it going before I put it in the fire box. But now I have the question that-----if I am using wood only, how do I add more wood without getting the white smoke?



You will always get white smoke when the wood first heats up and begins smoking...just like charcoal.

 

For smoke woods:

 

Here's a trick you may consider for your electric rig, which I use very frequently with my gassers: Use varying sized pieces of smoke woods, from small chips of about 1/2 to 3/4" thick by an inch or so across or smaller, to 3/4 to 1" thick by 1 -1/2 to 2" across, to chunks of 1 -1/2" to 2" thick by 3 to 4" across and thicker. Place the smallest pieces on the bottom of the heap, closest to the heat source.

 

Here's what will happen: the smallest pieces will ignite and smoke faster, but don't last long. When they're about through smoking, the next size up should already be taking over the task, and so on. The largest pieces will last the longest, and if there are lot of the larger pieces left over (not completely charred or burned up) when you're finished with the smoke, just toss 'em into a clean metal can with a lid, or an air tight charcoal grill, etc, to snuff 'em out and use at a later date for smoking.Or, you can toss 'em directly into your grill for grill searing and smoking. This method will greatly reduce, or may even eliminate the need to add smoke woods, even during a long smoke with butts or briskets.

 

 

For fuel woods:

 

Get a hot fire started (either with a few briquettes or wood) and let it burn down to coals, then feed smaller pieces at frequent intervals to keep a small, hot fire which burns cleaner. Also, pre-burning of your fuel woods will greatly reduce the smoke when you add them to the fire. Having no smoke at all when adding fuel to the fire box is not likely, but you can drastically reduce the smoke by heating and igniting the fuel quickly. With adding wood fuel, the onset of the smoke it generates is not necessarily a bad thing, as long the heavy smoke doesn't linger on and on for extended periods.

 

It's all about the initial heating/ignition which flashes off volatiles from the fuel or smoke wood which creates the white smoke.

 

 

Eric

post #48 of 48

Thanks for the advise, I can't wait for some better weather so I can try it out.

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