or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Smoking Bacon › Finally Found Some Bellies Locally!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Finally Found Some Bellies Locally! - Page 3

post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by alblancher View Post

Just to clarify a point.

 

Laying the green bacon skin side down on a rack allows the cure to draw moisture from the meat side of the bacon.  The skin and saran wrap act as a shield preventing the meat from drying out too rapidly.  The cure has the opportunity to move through the meat.  Where does that first dusting go if no moisture is developed and the cure disappears?  I contend that it is absorbed into the meat as the salt draws out the surface moisture and then the moisture is reabsorbed.  Very similar to what you describe except that I do not encourage the bacon to sit in a puddle of moisture.  Look at curing a Virginia, country style ham.  No moisture added, just thickly covered in salt, sugar and cure and allowed to sit in a covered pan of salt.

 

I am not trying to supplant your position as the resident bacon authority.  Just trying to share some things that I have learned.  The method I use is definitely more work and neophyte bacon makers would be better served using a fast, easy recipe the first time or two.  As they become a bit more experienced and maybe adventuresome it is good that they learn alternative ways of "playing with their food".  Similar to previous long discussions the two of us have had we are arguing very minor points of a, to me at least, very interesting topic.


I don't consider myself any kind of Bacon authority. I just like to keep it simple for myself & others.

As far as playing with the food, I flip & massage my Bacon packages every day--You don't.

I'm not going to keep going on & on about my leaving things (Liquid & the cure that is in the liquid) in the package. 

I leave it in there, so the cure that is still in that liquid can still go into the meat---You don't.

I think I'm right--You think you are.

 

You're right these are minor points we are "discussing", but I look at it differently when it comes to using Sodium Nitrite & Nitrates. Nothing is minor.

If I put 1 ounce of Tender Quick into a package with 2 pounds of meat, that is what I want to stay in there until the curing time is over.

You call that being a Bacon Authority---I call it following directions.

 

Been fun,

Bear

post #42 of 55

I got one whole side of bellies curing now, the dry cure method.  I am about 4 days now I have all four pieces in one bag.  I did weight and rub each one indivually, then put all 4 back into the same bag.  I rotate it around a couple times a day.  I plan on cold smoking this batch of bacon.

 

Chalee

post #43 of 55


Aloha Solaryellow,
  Your pork bellies look like they're doing well in their baggies. I cure my bacon the same way you've got it pictured below.  I try to squeeze as much air out of the baggies and then I turn over the baggies twice a day, in the morning on my way to work and in the evening when I return.  That way I make sure the cure reaches every part of the bacon......Are you going to cold smoke these puppies?  Cold smoke or not I think they're going to be great..

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by solaryellow View Post

I apologize in advance for the lack of pictures. I was working by myself today and did want to keep wasting pairs of gloves just to take pics.

 

For the 14 and 12 lbs bellies I took Al's advice and used a very simple cure #1, brown sugar, kosher salt dry cure......

 

DSC_0012_002.JPG

 

DSC_0010_002.JPG

post #44 of 55

WOOHOO!! just goes to show it never hurts to ask!  looking forward to the qview!

post #45 of 55
Thread Starter 


A while back Jerry and I had a conversation in chat about cold smoking vs hot smoking. I am going to go the cold smoking route with these. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old poi dog View Post


Aloha Solaryellow,
  Your pork bellies look like they're doing well in their baggies. I cure my bacon the same way you've got it pictured below.  I try to squeeze as much air out of the baggies and then I turn over the baggies twice a day, in the morning on my way to work and in the evening when I return.  That way I make sure the cure reaches every part of the bacon......Are you going to cold smoke these puppies?  Cold smoke or not I think they're going to be great..

 

 


 
post #46 of 55

Good Choice on "Cold Smoking".  You'll retain the fat, and your gonna fry anyways before you eat.

 

I add Garlic, Onion Powder, CBP, AllSpice and Cayenne Pepper to my cure along with Brown Sugar.  The flavors are very subtle, but noticeable. 

 

My first batch of bacon turned out awful, because I smoked it for far too long.  I only smoked (1) small slab, but learned a lot.  My next batch was awesome.  You could try different spices on a couple slabs, so you can choose which you prefer.  Possibly a "Peppered Bacon" or Maple Coated Bacon".  For these, you would coat the slabs after they are cured and before they are smoked.

 

Post your finished pics and results....Please?

 

 

Todd

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

Reply
post #47 of 55

My first batch of bacon turned out awful, because I smoked it for far too long.  I only smoked (1) small slab, but learned a lot. 

 

Todd can you expand on this statement.  I've read in Cowgirls (I think) that she smokes hers for up to 14 hours.  In your opion if your smoking at or below 100 degrees, what do you base your time on?    When I have viewed  Cowgirls thread http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forum/thread/73131/smokehouse-bacon  I see that she smoked at 65 maybe that's why she smokes so long.

 

Chalee

post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheapChalee View Post

My first batch of bacon turned out awful, because I smoked it for far too long.  I only smoked (1) small slab, but learned a lot. 

 

Todd can you expand on this statement.  I've read in Cowgirls (I think) that she smokes hers for up to 14 hours.  In your opion if your smoking at or below 100 degrees, what do you base your time on?    When I have viewed  Cowgirls thread http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forum/thread/73131/smokehouse-bacon  I see that she smoked at 65 maybe that's why she smokes so long.

 

Chalee


While you wait for Todd:

 

First of all, if you had a piece of Bacon turn awful, it wouldn't be from smoking too long---Too hot?, too heavy smoke (creosote)?, but not too long.

 

There are many ways of smoking. Cowgirl is a master (Masteress???). She gets great results with cold smoking (most say under 100˚---some say under 80˚). So does Pineywoods, and others. I prefer to start out low, and work my way up slowly, to about 160˚ smoker temp. I don't worry about what the internal temp is, because I have taken them out as low as 100˚, and as high as 142˚, and they were all awesome. I remove them when they have a nice dark reddish brown color, and have firmed up a bit. I have also found that a little heat helps develop that color, as long as you don't actually "cook" it. Like I said, "This is my method, and there are many other good methods of smoking Bacon".

 

Bear

post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheapChalee View Post

My first batch of bacon turned out awful, because I smoked it for far too long.  I only smoked (1) small slab, but learned a lot. 

 

Todd can you expand on this statement.  I've read in Cowgirls (I think) that she smokes hers for up to 14 hours.  In your opion if your smoking at or below 100 degrees, what do you base your time on?    When I have viewed  Cowgirls thread http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forum/thread/73131/smokehouse-bacon  I see that she smoked at 65 maybe that's why she smokes so long.

 

Chalee

Let me explain.....

 

For my first bacon, I followed Cowgirl's instructions.  You have to take into account, she has a large outdoor smokehouse, and I had a 40" MES.  The two smokers are different animals, and you can't necessarily follow the same methods for both  To create smoke in my MES, I had to use the heating element, so cold smoking was out of the question.  My MES blew out a lot of white smoke, and at the time, I thought that was really cool, but soon realized I was making creosote!!

 

12 hours of nice, smooth, sweet smelling smoke is much different than 12 hours of nasty, white, creosote filled smoke.

 

So, Bear is absolutely correct, that is was not the time, but was the creosote, created by the poor quality smoke I was producing.

 

Lesson Learned:  The TBS is necessary for good quality smoking!!!

 

 

Todd
 

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

Reply
post #50 of 55
Thread Starter 

A bucket o' bacon anyone?

 

DSC_0019_002.JPG

 

In the plywood smoker awaiting its fate.

 

DSC_0024_002.JPG

 

Middle of the smoke:

 

DSC_0028_001.JPG

post #51 of 55

lookin good Joel.!PDT_Armataz_01_34.gif

post #52 of 55

Nice load of Bacon!!!

 

You're gonna need a lot of help eating all of that!

 

Whatever you do, please don't forget the final Qview, including some slices!!!!

Bear

post #53 of 55

Very nice!  i think I'll have the Mrs order a case o'bellies from Whole Foods and not pick it up!  Then go there and ask around.  Sneaky! 

I will not do it, only kidding.  thats someunderhanded stuff.  But I know people who would do it.

Bacon, must find bacon.  Great discussion fellas.

post #54 of 55
Thread Starter 

 

Still got one more belly to slice up.
 
DSC_0027_003.JPG
 
 
My first one I butchered pretty badly trying to cut the skin off.
 
DSC_0028_002.JPG
 
A sharp knife makes a world of difference. 
 
DSC_0037.JPG
 
This turned out very very well overall. Thankfully I have enough to last for quite some time but I am looking forward to the next time. I did do one belly with the same mixture I use for buckboard bacon. I prefer Al's simple recipe instead.
 
Thanks for all the help folks!
post #55 of 55
Thread Starter 

I do believe I just had the best BLTs of my life. PDT_Armataz_01_12.gif

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Smoking Bacon
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Smoking Bacon › Finally Found Some Bellies Locally!