Got Brisket

Discussion in 'Beef' started by bigmikey14, Apr 5, 2016.

  1. bigmikey14

    bigmikey14 Smoke Blower

    Wet aging 17 briskets for 45 days for a graduation party in mid May

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  2. So that's where they all went!
     
  3. smokinal

    smokinal Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    When you say wet ageing.

    Are those the cryovac packages the briskets came in?

    Do you just leave them in the fridge for 45 days like that?

    Al
     
  4. bigmikey14

    bigmikey14 Smoke Blower

    Yes, but you must know the kill date which is printed oN the cases.
     
  5. 3montes

    3montes Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    I have heard about wet aging but have never done it. Can you provide more detail? Apparently the kill date determines how long you can wet age them for? What are the benefits to wet aging for 45 days? I would want some real noticeable results if I'm tying up a whole fridge for 45 days.

    Do they magically turn into prime rib?? [​IMG]
     
  6. dirtsailor2003

    dirtsailor2003 Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Al,

    From what I've read on the subject, you can go 6 weeks total time from the kill date. The meat needs to be sealed in the cryopack from that date and not opened. I don't know if I'd trust getting the meat from a normal grocery store and trying this. I have had too many failed cryopacks when I've bought whole muscle meat from them. If I was going to try this method I would go straight to the source.

    Temperature during the process is crucial too. The fridge needs to be right at 34°-36° for the entire aging process.

    Wet aging was developed so that the processor can ship the product to market faster and also so they don't have to store it. Basically the aging starts once it is packed, and continues during shipping and until the store opens the package.

    "The enzymes still have time to tenderize the meat enough to make it acceptable, and the biggest plus is that there's no weight-loss in the meat due to dehydration. Wet-aging also costs less for the manufacturer since the meat doesn't need to be stored or monitored, ultimately resulting in a lower consumer cost."
     
  7. idahopz

    idahopz Smoking Fanatic

    I understand the same as dirtsailor2003.  My last brisket was wet aged only a week, after being in the freezer for about a year.  I wanted to wet age longer, but the missus was impatient.  It turned out to be the best packer brisket I've ever made - me and the missus finished it off in 4 days, meal after meal.
     
  8. jcbigler

    jcbigler Smoking Fanatic SMF Premier Member

    So wait, you're telling us that we have to wait for 45 days to actually see you cook these things? :icon_rolleyes:
     
  9. That's impressive!

    Sorry for the newbie question but what is the kill date? Is that just the sell by day on the package or is there some other date I'm not aware of?
     
  10. jcbigler

    jcbigler Smoking Fanatic SMF Premier Member

    Umm...it's the date that the cow was killed, and then slaughtered. Have to know that in order to know what the longest you can age a piece of meat for. Although the date on the box is usually the process date, which can be a couple of days after the kill date. 
     
  11. Duh! lol thanks that didn't even occur to me. So is that date only on bulk packaging?
     
  12. motoman3b

    motoman3b Fire Starter

    I could be wrong but I thought freezing killed any enzymes that normally are active during meat ageing and this is why previously frozen meat cannot be aged??  
     
  13. idahopz

    idahopz Smoking Fanatic

    Not exactly, but under the proper circumstances, enzyme activity can be affected - all depends on the conditions prior to, and after freezing.  My graduate degree was studying reproductive enzyme activity, and examining the results using transmission electron microscopy. We regularly stored all biological materials in frozen form.  When thawed, they were as active as the day they were frozen.  However, the prepared materials must be frozen as quickly as possible because any protease activity at room temperature will continue to digest proteins, even the enzymes themselves, which are also protein in nature.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
  14. jcbigler

    jcbigler Smoking Fanatic SMF Premier Member

    Yes, usually that date is on the box that the processor assembles which will contain 4-6 cryovaced briskets (or other meats) as they are shipped to the local retailer or butcher shop, at least from what I have read. I've not had occassion to buy more than a couple of briskets at a time so I haven't been able to see what info is listed on the box.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
  15. motoman3b

    motoman3b Fire Starter

    Ahh you learn something new everyday, and on a second note this forum would be the last place I would think to find anyone mentioning electron microscopy I work as a tech in the histology field so I can appreciate your research I've seen a couple electron microscopes in use cool stuff!   Thanks for insight!
     
  16. idahopz

    idahopz Smoking Fanatic

    lol, I know what you mean - I was a student under the original professors that developed the in vitro fertilization techniques decades ago, and my project was to identify hyaluronidase, an enzyme that helps digest a path through the outer egg coats. I created antibodies to the enzyme, attached nano gold particles to the antibodies, and then exposed the native enzymes to the antibodies to visualize the exact location of the enzymes under the TEM - it was fun.

    Sorry to hijack the topic for a couple of posts, but it kind of relates to the topic of enzymes in meats, since enzymes are basically the same in almost all places where they are found.
     
  17. 3montes

    3montes Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    So would the same be true if you wanted to wet age cryovac pork butts? Still not sure what benefit all this gets you? More tender? Is it that noticeable to make it worth all the extra effort and time?
     
  18. bigmikey14

    bigmikey14 Smoke Blower

    Had an open night so decided to get a handful of these going. So far they are aged 30 days from kill date. Rinsed, trimmed and seasoned with Tatonka Dust, 4 on the ys480 at 325, 1 on the kettle with a snake around the vortex at 275. Hickory and cherry smoke. When I was happy with the bark, about 165, I separated the flat and point in all but one. 4 flats and 2 points got vac sealed and into the Sous vide bath at 135. 2 points got cubed up for burnt ends and back on smoker. That last brisket got wrapped in foil and taking to probe tender hopefully before bedtime.
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    To be continued...

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  19. bigmikey14

    bigmikey14 Smoke Blower

    here's some of the finished burnt ends

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    And some more on smoker right now

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  20. bigmikey14

    bigmikey14 Smoke Blower

    Out of the bath after 24 hours, shocked cold in ice water and fridged overnight. Points were cubed for more burnt ends, flats sliced to 1/8" on slicer
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