got an oak question

Discussion in 'Woods for Smoking' started by jefflisa828, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. hey guy's i'm back for a bit any way going to mexico in january been gone almost all summer good to be home. anyhow my mom called she needs 3 oak trees cut down and I am bringin it home they are dead but have not started to rot yet how long do they need to season for? and what kind of flavor is oak? gonna swap half and half with a buddy for some maple.

    Oh ya forgot yes while I was at the cottage for 6 weeks I took my smoker lol I am hooked on smokin
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2011
  2. jirodriguez

    jirodriguez Master of the Pit OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Oak is very subtle in flavor, almost neutral, it is a great wood to have on hand.

    As for seasoning it the best thing is to split it and cut it into small chunks to season. The rule of thumb is 1 yr. of seasoning per inch of diameter of wood. A good indicator of dry well seasoned wood is when you look at the end you see radial cracks radiating out from the middle of the piece.
     
  3. tjohnson

    tjohnson Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Insider OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Johnny is right, Oak is mild.

    I always passed on Oak because I have tons of other woods to smoke with.

    Lately, I've used oak, and really like the mild smoke it produces.  The aroma is similar to Pecan, but even milder.

    Todd
     
  4. thanks guy's
     
  5. smokinal

    smokinal Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    I use it all the time, but usually with a blend maybe half hickory & half oak.
     
  6. cliffcarter

    cliffcarter Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

    If I were you I would trade for as much maple as I could get, much better for cooking with IMHO.
     
  7. It is my favorite we love maple here have never tried oak
     
  8. Indeed, the subtlety of Oak is it's strong point.  It's my go-to wood when I want to add that "taste of the outdoors", without "smoke" being the star in the flavor matrix.
     
  9. flash

    flash Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Oak is considered to be the second most popular wood to use. Red oak is considered the best by pit masters. Southern Oak I would term as more heavy of a flavor, give great color to the meats. Black jack and Turkey oak is what I use the most. Good for red meat, fish and pork.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2011
  10. thanks for all your help guy's keep'em comin I do alot of pork it's are favourite and I now have a 1/2 ton load of oak and all I need 10 mins away
     
  11. solaryellow

    solaryellow Limited Mod Group Lead

    I prefer oak with beef. It seems very complimentary to me.
     
    dpeart likes this.
  12. flash

    flash Smoking Guru OTBS Member


     Give some great color on beef. I love to mix with Cherry.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2011
  13. cliffcarter

    cliffcarter Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

    Just out of curiosity, which oak species is it that you have?
     
  14. not really sure don't know much about woods but it is from southern Manitoba Canada
     
  15. flash

    flash Smoking Guru OTBS Member


    And there are A LOT of different oaks too.
     
  16. I will see if I can figure it out lol
     
  17. eman

    eman Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member

    Oak is mostly used for heat w/ other woods for flavor. It has a very mild flavor.
     
  18. ok so I called my mom and googled and figured out it is bur oak commonly confused with white oak ( not sure why that was important lol) but it says that it provides a sweet smoke for beef and pork and my mothers neighbor uses it in his outdoor handmade mud brick tower of lovin oven I call it he bakes bread and buns in it with this oak and man are they good
     
  19. thanks thats good to know

     
     
  20. grange

    grange Fire Starter

    Some good information about oak.  I cut a lot of red oak and maple (red maple I believe) so since I like the smokiness in my bbq I'm going to give some of the maple a try if I have any left after burring it for heat this winter.
     

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