Chicken thighs taste funny

Discussion in 'Poultry' started by jalee, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. jalee

    jalee Fire Starter

    I smoked my chicken thighs Sunday for 1.5 pulled at 167 i used charcoal to stat fire then ran on oak . used wet hickery and cherry for smoke. they were done and juice but had a weird chemical taste to them the charcoal was natural no fluid. Does any one know why
     
  2. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    jalee, welcome to the forum.  Was it the match light type charcoal?

    Tom
     
  3. fwismoker

    fwismoker Master of the Pit

    The creosote was out of balance....high wise.  

    The best advice i can give you is patience. When using wood/charcoal don't put your food in early....let your pit get good and hot first up to your desired temp and let all that primary combustion(white smoke) burn off before you introduce your food to it.    Put your wood chunks/chips on the coals a short while before the food also.

    You don't need a ton of smoke coming out the exhaust, a very subtle almost invisible smoke is just fine. You'll learn little by little how much wood smoke and flavor you want but remember that is a seasoning and you can't take it back after it's too much.

    Also don't use wet wood for lots of reasons, it's worthless to put it simply.  
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
    dockman likes this.
  4. jckdanls 07

    jckdanls 07 Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

    what kind of smoker are you using ? was the wood wet or green or both ? kinda need more info...
     
  5. fpnmf

    fpnmf Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Fl
    Ahhhh pictures.... much better!!

      Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  6. fwismoker

    fwismoker Master of the Pit

    He gave some info...he used wet wood, natural charcoal and no lighter fluid. 
     
  7. jalee

    jalee Fire Starter

    I cooked a brisket for 7.5hr it was fine I pulled it and put the chicken on after.the charcoal I used was red something charcoal and started it in my chimney I let run for 30 min before I put the brisket on. I used seasoned oak after that and didn't add any more charcoal. The wet hickory and cherry was seasoned I soaked it over night. I have a old country smoker and I was having a hard time keeping the temp up I had to leave the door damper open half way or more to keep temp up.I never really got that thin blue smoke.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  8. fwismoker

    fwismoker Master of the Pit

    Yea Jalee wet wood is no good.   If you're worried about the wood bursting into flames it won't if your pit is fairly tight.  Only excess oxygen to the fire makes the wood explode into flames. 

    Use dry wood and don't ever dump in lots of unlit coals when the temp goes down and you'll be just fine.   If your pit does need extra fuel then a little at a time or add a chimney but only half lit.   

    Like i said it's all good, you'll get your TBS you want.   Keith
     
  9. oldschoolbbq

    oldschoolbbq Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Why the person that started the "wet wood and chip" theory was all wet himself (IMHO) all you get is thick smoke and it carries the Creosote and Gasses that causes the off flavor in meat.

    Wait until you get a thin-bluish-smoke , then cook. You'll see a great difference.

    Have fun , better luck with your Smokes and as always . . .
     
  10. mr t 59874

    mr t 59874 Master of the Pit SMF Premier Member

    I am curious as to the amount of wood you used and if you did the same for the brisket and the results for it.  I agree with FWI as far as the wet wood.  The hickory can give a strong smoke flavor if not controlled.  As far as the thin smoke, it is not essential on the shorter smokes such as chicken, especially if you like a heavier smoke flavor.  It does work very well on the longer smokes such as your brisket though.  Try it again with dry wood only and keep track of the amounts.  You will be fine.

    Tom
     
  11. jckdanls 07

    jckdanls 07 Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

    I also notice in your picture that your exhaust vent is almost closed all the way... this vent needs to be opened all the way.. then control your heat with the intake vent... when exhaust vent is closed like that your smoke can not escape fast enough and becomes creosote... so next time run with the exhaust vent wide open and your wood dry... it will take a good 15 minutes after making intake vent adjustments for heat changes to take effect...
     
  12. jalee

    jalee Fire Starter

    Ok thanks fellas I will fallow y'all's advice on my next smoke
     
  13. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    JckDanls hit it on the head..... exhaust stack wide open at all times..... control the heat with the inlet on the firebox.....  

    Dave
     
  14. I had the same problem for a while then I realized what I was doing wrong. Too much fuel and too little air, the wood was burning too cold and giving a bad taste. I have since lowered the amount of wood I use and opened the vents. A small hot fire gave me the TBS and wonderful taste.
     
  15. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    Got to back the boys! Stack wide open and use Dry wood for Smoke...I don't recall ever seeing a Pro/Comp smoker throw wet wood on the fire. I guess it's a Bobby Flay thing...JJ
     
  16. cliffcarter

    cliffcarter Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

    Very good advice above, never try to cook with wet or green wood in a stickburner.
     
  17. dougmays

    dougmays Limited Mod Group Lead

    ditto on the creosote, do much smoke and need damper wide open
     
  18. This is what I saw in the picture too. Good luck and let us know how the next chicken comes out.
     
  19. Wet Wood.

    When I started I always had the wood wet, I would soak it for awhile before putting it in foil in my BBQ, I did the same when I started with my smoker... why? Because when you buy a bag of wood chips, chunks, whatever it says on the bag to soak them before use. It was not until I found this place that I learned never to soak the wood. With the season started expect many new smokers to use soaked wood. I learned thanks to all you guys, but to be honest, most new people are just following the directions on the bag.

    Barry
     

Share This Page