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Posts by dls1

 Weberkettleman, thanks for the heads up about the documentary video. I've checked and saw that it's still available on Netflix but I've not had the time to watch it yet. Do you recall the names of the ten restaurants highlighted in the video? The place that you refer to in Spain sounds like a place that I've been to a few times known as Bodega El Capricho. El Capricho specializes in mature Chuleton de Buey (ox), generally preparing retired working animals between 8 to16...
 I dry aged many beef roasts in a spare utility refrigerator similar to what you're describing. I always have one roast in it on rotation so it's almost never not being used for dry aging. Currently, I have a 7.5 pound boneless NY strip loin roast about 14 days into a (planned) 45 day cycle. In addition, the refrigerator is used for the storage of bottles and cans of beer and a few other beverages. Nothing else! Those items are not removed and replaced, except for...
First, I want to emphasize that my comments are directed solely to the use of the UMAi bags Another for dry aging beef, not for the production of charcuterie or salumi. That's a different subject altogether. My "conventional drying setup" is pretty basic. I use an old second utility refrigerator located in our basement that is primarily used for backup storage of beverages, and it does have a lot of ongoing activity. I place the open and uncovered roast on a cooling rack...
If you have a decent sized Hispanic population nearby, check with the grocers, especially those with a full meat department, that focus on serving the community. Beef cheeks (cachetes, cachetes de vaca) will often be offered fresh in the meat display case. Sometimes, they'll be prepackaged and displayed in the frozen food coolers. One very popular commercial brand is supplied by a Cargill specialty subsidiary known as Rumba Meats, which prepares and packages beef cuts...
Very nice job, SM. The steaks look great.   I've dry aged a lot of roasts for several years in the traditional manner, meaning open, without doing so in a bag, with excellent results. The shortest time I've ever gone was 28 days, and the longest was 62 days. My "Sweet Spot" for the best results is around 45 days, but that's subjective and personal.   In your original post you said "I'm loving these UMAi bags", and I have to ask "Why?". I've given consideration to...
Beautiful job, LondonFog.   Starting with some beautifully trimmed and cleaned cheeks all the way through to a sandwich that looks to be over the top. Pointworthy for certain.   To me, properly prepared cheeks are some of the best meat from a cow. Once cooked, there are so many ways you can use the shredded meat, such as your sandwich. One of my favorites is to use the meat as stuffing for raviolis. Another is to mix the shredded meat with caramelized onions, form a...
Looking forward to following this. I've never made ndjua but I've sure eaten a lot of it over the years both, in Italy, and more recently, the U.S., and as far as salumis go, it may well be my favorite.   I'm also interested in seeing what your formulation is. The better versions of nduja that I've had call a fat to lean ratio of at least 70% fat to 30% lean. A good friend of mine makes an outstanding version of nduja which uses only jowl meat and belly that comes in at...
Hope it works out for you. Also, It's kind of hard to tell from your photo, but it kind of looks like you're using a Ziploc bag. Those are fine for most SV cooks, but at temps in excess of 160 for an extended period of time, the seams will sometimes degrade. As a precaution, you may want to double bag it. Good luck.
I've cooked a number of chuck roasts sous vide at 133°F to be finished and sliced as steaks for 24-36 hours and they've come out great. Sliced around 1" thick and seared, they're a very good, and inexpensive, alternative to rib eyes, but not something you can shred for sandwich meat. For that, you're going to need to cook at 170°F+ for around 36 hours, if not longer.
 It's good you can get your chiletepins fresh. If I could get ABEs fresh I'd do the same as you and freeze them. Unfortunately, that's not going to happen. Piri Peri is so tightly associated with chicken but your right as there are so many other uses for it. It's great with shellfish such as shrimp, clams, mussels, etc. I also use it to flavor many soups and stews and occasionally add it to plain white rice as it cooks. There are also some traditional Portuguese dishes I...
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