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Posts by dls1

Brussel sprouts are notorious "floaters" when cooked sous vide, and your experience with them doing so was normal. They're cruciferous vegetables that contain sulphurous chemicals that expel gases when cooked. As tightly vacuum packed as your bag might have been, those gases will still cause it to rise to the top and float on the surface. Other vegetables of the same class and behavior include broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, bok choy, etc. To overcome that happening, you...
Interesting info Dave, but the FDA needs to get its act together as their release is a bit (or a lot) misleading. The product in question is definitely not the singular herb thyme, which I'm surprised you didn't notice, or mention.   In looking at the photos you posted I noticed on the back of the package an ingredient list which seemed odd as there needn't be one for a single ingredient item such as thyme. The product in question is za'atar, a traditional Middle Eastern...
When preparing pastrami using a homemade, or commercially made, corned beef, I keep the spice blend for the rub pretty traditional,   3 tbs coriander seeds, lightly cracked 2 tbs black peppercorns, lightly cracked 1 tbs  white peppercorns, lightly cracked (use 3 tbs of black peppercorns if you don’t have white peppercorns) 2 tbs brown or yellow mustard seeds, or a 50/50 blend, lightly cracked 2 tbs minced or granulated garlic  
trx680,   When you mention a whole rib eye (boneless) are you referring to a full 7 bone roast with the bone removed. If so, I've not done one that large, but I have done a 4 bone roast sous vide where the bone had been removed and tied back on much in the same manner that Aldersmoke did.   I removed and reserved the bone, cut the roast in half to better fit a large Cambro container I use for SV, then seasoned and bagged each half and cooked them at 133F 3 days ahead...
Nice job, and excellent video, on a good subject, Eric.   I've done this several times overnight for 10-12 hours at 145°F, and have always had excellent results.   As you mentioned, the key is to use good quality bacon, thickly cut, and in a well sealed package.   Unless I'm purposefully cooking a large amount of bacon for a specific reason, I look for the 12 oz, or even 8 oz., packages since there's only two of us. Whatever the outcome, the cooked, but unfinished,...
Damn, that's a beautiful plate, and everything sounds perfect. Now, I'm hungry. BTW, I like the way you smoked your eggs by doing the halved whites only. More smoke penetration in less time.
I understand, and maybe I misread it but I thought your original post said you were going for 48 hours based on recommendations others had made. I assume that you have cooked a number of top round roasts in the pasts in a more conventional manner. How would you compare the taste and texture of the meat from those cooks to the one you did sous vide?
Looks like it came out very, Case. Why do you think the roast might have benefited from another 4 hours in the water bath?   When I slice a roast like that, I do it as thinly as possible. How did you like the texture at the thickness you sliced yours.   You've inspired me to pick up a top round to cook sous vide for "Chicago Style" Italian beef sandwiches. Though it's been a while, I've made the beef for them many times, but never using the sous vide method.   Nice...
Pulling it to check is always a good idea, especially if you're in virgin territory. If it needs to cook more, then continue on. You can always go forward, but you can't go back. I do the same with the roasts. Trying to slice steaks for sandwiches and French dips is kind of pointless. Be wary of what you find on the internet about cooking sous vide. Like all forums and threads, there are a lot of self proclaimed experts on the subject who haven't a clue of what they're...
Interesting experiment, DS. Once you get it dialed in you'll see one of the true benefits of sous vide is the ability to transform lesser service or utility cuts such as round into something far superior than you would normally expect. The final results may not mirror a well aged prime grade tenderloin, but they won't be far off.   One thing I question is why did you select a target cook time of 48 hours, which seems excessive to me. I've cooked a fair number of top...
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